Skip header and navigation

Refine By

770 records – page 1 of 77.

Older adult mistreatment risk screening: contribution to the validation of a screening tool in a domestic setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123904
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):235-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jeannette M Lindenbach
Sylvie Larocque
Anne-Marise Lavoie
Marie-Luce Garceau
Author Affiliation
Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. jm_lindenbach@laurentian.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):235-52
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Elder Abuse - diagnosis
Humans
Language
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
ABSTRACTThe hidden nature of older adult mistreatment renders its detection in the domestic setting particularly challenging. A validated screening instrument that can provide a systematic assessment of risk factors can facilitate this detection. One such instrument, the "expanded Indicators of Abuse" tool, has been previously validated in the Hebrew language in a hospital setting. The present study has contributed to the validation of the "e-IOA" in an English-speaking community setting in Ontario, Canada. It consisted of two phases: (a) a content validity review and adaptation of the instrument by experts throughout Ontario, and (b) an inter-rater reliability assessment by home visiting nurses. The adaptation, the "Mistreatment of Older Adult Risk Factors" tool, offers a comprehensive tool for screening in the home setting. This instrument is significant to professional practice as practitioners working with older adults will be better equipped to assess for risk of mistreatment.
PubMed ID
22647665 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Danish Communicative Developmental Inventories: validity and main developmental trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92876
Source
J Child Lang. 2008 Aug;35(3):651-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Bleses Dorthe
Vach Werner
Slott Malene
Wehberg Sonja
Thomsen Pia
Madsen Thomas O
Basbøll Hans
Author Affiliation
Center for Child Language, Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. bleses@.sdu.dk
Source
J Child Lang. 2008 Aug;35(3):651-69
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Communication
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Language Development
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Speech Production Measurement
Verbal Learning
Abstract
This paper presents a large-scale cross-sectional study of Danish children's early language acquisition based on the Danish adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI). Measures of validity and reliability imply that the Danish adaptation of the American CDI has been adjusted linguistically and culturally in appropriate ways which makes it suitable for tapping into Danish children's language acquisition. The study includes 6,112 randomly selected children in the age of 0 ; 8 to 3 ; 0, and results related to the development of early gestures, comprehension and production of words as well as grammatical skills, are presented.
PubMed ID
18588718 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fatal asthma in Finnish children and adolescents 1976-1998: validity of death certificates and a clinical description.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165492
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2007 Mar;42(3):210-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Kristiina Malmström
Minna Kaila
Merja Kajosaari
Pirkko Syvänen
Kaisu Juntunen-Backman
Author Affiliation
Skin and Allergy Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. kristiina.malmstrom@pp.fimnet.fi
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2007 Mar;42(3):210-5
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Death Certificates
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Several studies show that asthma mortality in children and adolescents increased until the mid-1990s, after which it has slightly decreased worldwide. The objective of this study was to describe the mortality rates of childhood asthma in Finland, and to analyze patient characteristics to identify predisposing factors for fatal asthma exacerbation among children and adolescents during 1976-1998 (2004). All death certificates where asthma or related respiratory tract disease was coded as the underlying cause of death were reviewed for those under 20 years of age. Health care records and autopsy reports were evaluated to validate the cause of death and to identify any predisposing factors. In all, there had been 28 asthma deaths. The validity of the death certificates proved to be good as only 7% were misclassified. Death occurred either in the very young children or adolescents: the median age in the group of 12 years (n = 13) was 18.1 years. The fatal exacerbations occurred mostly during summer and early autumn. Clinical triggers, recorded for 14/22 patients with available patient records, included respiratory infection, (12) use of ibuprofen despite known allergy (1), and exercise after visiting a horse stable (1). The severity of the disease was discernible in 21 patients: severe in 15, moderate in 5, and mild in 1 patient. Inhaled corticosteroids were not used as maintenance or periodic therapy in 12/22 patients, of whom 4 had died during the 1990s. In conclusion, asthma mortality in Finnish children and adolescents was rare and its incidence remained stable. The validity of the death certificate diagnoses proved to be good. Poor asthma management and non or undertreatment with inhaled corticosteroids were risk factors for fatal asthma.
PubMed ID
17245733 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of cryptorchidism diagnoses and corrective surgical treatment registration in the Danish National Patient Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121500
Source
J Urol. 2012 Oct;188(4):1324-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
M S Jensen
T M Ø Snerum
L H Olsen
A M Thulstrup
J P Bonde
J. Olsen
T B Henriksen
Author Affiliation
Perinatal Epidemiology Research Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark. morten@sondergaard-jensen.dk
Source
J Urol. 2012 Oct;188(4):1324-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cryptorchidism - diagnosis - surgery
Denmark
Humans
Infant
Male
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
In recent years several Danish studies of the etiology, time trends and long-term health consequences of cryptorchidism have relied on diagnoses and surgical treatments registered in the National Patient Registry. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of these registry data.
According to the Danish National Patient Registry, 16,168 males were diagnosed with cryptorchidism and 9,244 surgical treatments for cryptorchidism were performed between January 1, 1995 and October 10, 2009. We randomly selected 500 diagnosed cases, of which 284 had been managed surgically. We requested the medical records from the departments making the diagnoses and performing the surgery.
We successfully retrieved medical records for 452 diagnosed cases (90%) and 249 operations (88%). Overall positive predictive value of a registry diagnosis of cryptorchidism was 80% (95% CI 77-84) using the testicular position described by the physician performing the clinical examination as the gold standard. Similarly the positive predictive value of the surgical treatment registration was 99% (95% CI 98-100) using the type of procedure performed.
The data on cryptorchidism in the Danish National Patient Registry are quite accurate. In etiological research the limited misclassification will in most cases only slightly attenuate estimates of the true relative association. Thus, the registry has the potential to serve as a valuable research tool, although caution should be exercised when studying time trends or geographical differences.
PubMed ID
22902026 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reproducibility of an extensive self-report questionnaire used in secondary coronary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283790
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):269-276
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Peersen
Munkhaugen
Gullestad
Dammen
Moum
Otterstad
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):269-276
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Secondary Prevention
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Self-reported information from questionnaires is frequently used in clinical epidemiological studies, but few provide information on the reproducibility of instruments applied in secondary coronary prevention studies. This study aims to assess the test-retest reproducibility of the questionnaire applied in the cross-sectional NORwegian CORonary (NOR-COR) Prevention Study.
In the NOR-COR study 1127 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of 249 questions, of which there are both validated instruments and de novo questions. Test-retest reliability of the instrument was estimated after four weeks in 99 consecutive coronary patients. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Kappa (?) were calculated.
The mean interval between test and retest was 33 (±6.4) days. Reproducibility values for questions in the first part of the questionnaire did not differ from those in the latter. A good to very good reproducibility was found for lifestyle factors (smoking: ? = 1.0; exercise: ICC = 0.90), medical factors (drug adherence: ICC = 0.74; sleep apnoea: ICC = 0.87), and psychosocial factors (anxiety and depression: ICC = 0.95; quality of life 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF12): ICC = 0.89), as well as for the majority of de-novo-created variables covering the patient's perceptions, motivation, needs, and preferences.
The present questionnaire demonstrates a highly acceptable reproducibility for all key items and instruments. It thus emerges as a valuable tool for evaluating patient factors associated with coronary risk factor control in CHD patients.
Notes
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2005 Jan-Feb;67(1):89-9715673629
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2016 Apr;23 (6):636-4825687109
Cites: EuroIntervention. 2015 Mar 22;10 (11):e1-724472705
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2009 Sep;18(17):2436-4319694877
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2016 Feb;25(2):343-926231590
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2015 Oct 21;36(40):2696-70526306399
Cites: Control Clin Trials. 1991 Aug;12(4 Suppl):142S-158S1663851
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2006 Jun;60(6):631-716731240
Cites: J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;37(4):299-31316678121
Cites: Europace. 2010 Mar;12(3):364-7020056594
Cites: Psychol Health Med. 2013;18(6):627-4423324073
Cites: J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2012 Jul;14(7):429-3422747615
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2007 Nov;63(5):545-5017980229
Cites: Int Rev Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;26(2):155-7624892892
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;60(1):34-4217161752
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2003 Jun;37(3):197-206; discussion 20612782543
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2008 Dec;107(3):691-70619235401
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Jan;36(1):52-6118426785
Cites: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2016;50(1):1-826488672
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Jul;33(13):1635-70122555213
Cites: Ann Readapt Med Phys. 2008 Jun;51(5):366-7818599146
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Feb 15;153(4):404-911207159
Cites: Med Care. 1996 Mar;34(3):220-338628042
Cites: Circulation. 2014 Mar 25;129(12):1350-6924566200
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2004 Apr;13(3):571-8615130022
Cites: Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2002 Apr;12 (2):60-7012189905
Cites: Front Psychol. 2012 Aug 13;3:28822905030
Cites: Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2011 Feb;4(1):15-2521160035
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Nov 28;165(21):2508-1316314548
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74843571
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2006 Aug;47(4):281-9116869861
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2013 Apr;20(2):322-3022383854
Cites: Intern Med J. 2006 Oct;36(10):643-716958641
PubMed ID
28181463 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reliability and validity of proxy respondent information about childhood injury: an assessment of a Canadian surveillance system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208633
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 May 1;145(9):834-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1997
Author
C. Macarthur
G. Dougherty
I B Pless
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 May 1;145(9):834-41
Date
May-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The reliability and validity of proxy respondent information in the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program surveillance system was assessed. A standardized form was used to collect data on injury date, location, context (activity at the time), breakdown factor (what went wrong), mechanism, product involvement, safety precaution use, and motor vehicle involvement. The test-retest method determined reliability, with the kappa coefficient quantifying agreement between respondent information provided in the emergency department and later during a telephone interview. Of 421 eligible respondents, 325 (77%) completed the telephone interview, with a median time to interview of 33 hours (range 24-70 hours). Agreement was high for all items; kappa coefficients ranged from 0.79 (substantial agreement) to 1.00 (perfect agreement). Reliability was not significantly modified by respondent view of the injury event, age of the child, language of the form, or level of respondent education. Validity was determined by measuring the agreement between respondent information and that provided by an independent witness. Witness information was considered to represent the truth. Of the 140 injury events selected, 92 (66%) had the form completed by both the original respondent and an independent witness. Kappa coefficients were greater than 0.65 for all but one item (safety precaution use), and the positive predictive value of respondent information for item categories whose prevalence was > or = 0.25 ranged from 0.82 to 0.95. The authors conclude that proxy respondent data on childhood injury are both reliable and valid.
PubMed ID
9143214 View in PubMed
Less detail

The predictive accuracy of pre-adoption video review in adoptees from Russian and Eastern European orphanages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183343
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2003 Sep;42(7):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Jon L Boone
Margaret K Hostetter
Carol Cohen Weitzman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8064, USA.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2003 Sep;42(7):585-90
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Bulgaria
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Orphanages
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Romania
Russia
Video Recording - utilization
Abstract
Many internationally adopted children have a pre-adoption video for prospective adoptive parents to review before their commitment to adopt. No published report to date has examined the value of the pre-adoption video evaluation (PreAVE) as a predictor of post-adoption developmental status. The present study was designed to determine whether PreAVE can predict the post-adoption developmental status of internationally adopted children. In this retrospective chart review, children who presented to the Yale International Adoption Clinic between December 1998 and September 2000, and had both a PreAVE and a post-adoption developmental evaluation (PosADE) were selected (N = 20) PreAVE was done using the Denver II and PosADE was done using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition. The Pearson r coefficient between the two ratings was determined and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. There was a significant correlation between the PreAVE and the PosADEs (r = 0.53, p = 0.01).The sensitivity of PreAVE to detect moderate to severe developmental delay was 43% and the specificity was 85%. Although ratings of development on PreAVE are similar to PosADE, the ability to detect moderate to severe developmental delay by video review is limited.
PubMed ID
14552516 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validation of the translated Oxford ankle foot questionnaire in 82 Danish children aged between five and 16 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262378
Source
Bone Joint J. 2015 Mar;97-B(3):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
P. Martinkevich
B. Møller-Madsen
M. Gottliebsen
L. Kjeldgaard Pedersen
O. Rahbek
Source
Bone Joint J. 2015 Mar;97-B(3):420-6
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ankle - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Female
Foot - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Translations
Abstract
We present the validation of a translation into Danish of the Oxford ankle foot questionnaire (OxAFQ). We followed the Isis Pros guidelines for translation and pilot-tested the questionnaire on ten children and their parents. Following modifications we tested the validity of the final questionnaire on 82 children (36 boys and 45 girls) with a mean age of 11.7 years (5.5 to 16.0) and their parents. We tested the reliability (repeatability (test-retest), child-parent agreement, internal consistency), feasibility (response rate, time to completion, floor and ceiling effects) and construct validity. The generic child health questionnaire was used for comparison. We found good internal consistency for the physical and the school and play domains, but lower internal consistency for the emotional domain. Overall, good repeatability was found within children and parents as well as agreement between children and parents. The OxAFQ was fast and easy to complete, but we observed a tendency towards ceiling effects in the school and play and emotional domains. To our knowledge this is the first independent validation of the OxAFQ in any language. We found it valid and feasible for use in the clinic to assess the impact on children's lives of foot and/or ankle disorders. It is a valuable research tool.
PubMed ID
25737528 View in PubMed
Less detail

Issues in evaluating fish consumption rates for Native American tribes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155174
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Dec;28(6):1497-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jamie Donatuto
Barbara L Harper
Author Affiliation
Swinomish Indian Trial Community, Office of Planning and Community Development, La Conner, WA 98257, USA. Jdonatuto@swinomish.nsn.us
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Dec;28(6):1497-506
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cultural Characteristics
Data Collection - methods
Diet
Fishes
Humans
Indians, North American
Nutritional Sciences
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
The environmental health goals of many Native American tribes are to restore natural resources and ensure that they are safe to harvest and consume in traditional subsistence quantities. Therefore, it is important to tribes to accurately estimate risks incurred through the consumption of subsistence foods. This article explores problems in conventional fish consumption survey methods used in widely cited tribal fish consumption reports. The problems arise because of the following: (1) widely cited reports do not clearly state what they intend to do with the data supporting these reports, (2) data collection methods are incongruent with community norms and protocols, (3) data analysis methods omit or obscure the highest consumer subset of the population, (4) lack of understanding or recognition of tribal health co-risk factors, and (5) restrictive policies that do not allow inclusion of tribal values within state or federal actions. In particular, the data collection and analysis methods in current tribal fish consumption surveys result in the misunderstanding that tribal members are satisfied with eating lower contemporary amounts of fish and shellfish, rather than the subsistence amounts that their cultural heritage and aboriginal rights indicate. A community-based interview method developed in collaboration with and used by the Swinomish Tribe is suggested as a way to gather more accurate information on contemporary consumption rates. For traditional subsistence rates, a multidisciplinary reconstruction method is recommended.
PubMed ID
18793286 View in PubMed
Less detail

Correlation of serum allergy (IgE) tests performed by different assay systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86170
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 May;121(5):1219-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Wang Julie
Godbold James H
Sampson Hugh A
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029-6574, USA. Julie.wang@mssm.edu
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 May;121(5):1219-24
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Hypersensitivity - blood - diagnosis
Immunoassay - methods
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In vitro testing is commonly used to diagnose and manage allergies. Clinical reactivity has been correlated with food-specific IgE levels by using the ImmunoCAP (Phadia, Uppsala, Sweden). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether IgE levels derived from different assays are equivalent to those measured by ImmunoCAP. METHODS: Fifty patients from the Mount Sinai Pediatric Allergy practice were prospectively enrolled. For each deidentified sample, specific IgE levels were measured to egg, milk, peanut, cat, birch, and Dermatophagoides farinae at different laboratories, each using a different assay system (Phadia ImmunoCAP, Agilent Turbo-MP, and Siemens Immulite 2000). Results were analyzed to determine whether IgE measurements were equivalent. Food allergen-specific IgE levels were correlated with clinical data and around empirically determined thresholds that predict probability of clinical disease in 50% or 95% of subjects. RESULTS: Variable degrees of agreement existed among the 3 assays. Immulite 2000 overestimated all specific IgE levels compared with ImmunoCAP. Turbo-MP overestimated for egg but underestimated for birch and D farinae. Differences for milk, peanut, and cat were observed, without a trend toward overestimation or underestimation. Furthermore, several values for the food allergens were discrepant around the 50% and 95% positive predictive values for clinical reactivity. CONCLUSION: Discrepancies in specific IgE values from 3 different assays can potentially lead to altered management and treatment. The predictive values for clinical reactivity associated with food-specific IgE levels determined by ImmunoCAP should not be applied to results from other assays.
PubMed ID
18243289 View in PubMed
Less detail

770 records – page 1 of 77.