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722 records – page 1 of 73.

[Validation of a medical economic standard (as exemplified by pediatric acute cranio-cerebral injury)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204231
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1998 Jul-Aug;(4):29-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
I V Poliakov
A A Kudriavstev
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1998 Jul-Aug;(4):29-32
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Brain Injuries - economics - therapy
Child
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Abstract
Socio-hygienic study of children with acute craniocerebral injuries carried out in the Kalinin district of St. Petersburg helped distinguish a part of general sequence of therapeutic measures in such injuries. This will optimize the development of medical and economic standard with due consideration for the treatment practice and its relation to medical science.
PubMed ID
9778985 View in PubMed
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Development and validation of a Meal Index of dietary Quality (Meal IQ) to assess the dietary quality of school lunches.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123236
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2091-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Marianne S Sabinsky
Ulla Toft
Klaus K Andersen
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. masab@food.dtu.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Nov;15(11):2091-9
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Denmark
Diet - standards
Humans
Lunch
Nutrition Assessment
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
School lunch programmes are one strategy to promote healthier dietary habits in children, but better evaluation tools for assessing the dietary quality of such programmes are needed. The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a simple index to assess the dietary quality of school lunches for children aged 7-13 years.
A Meal Index of dietary Quality (Meal IQ) was developed to consist of seven components (nutrients and food groups) based on dietary issues for children aged 7-13 years, which were identified in a national dietary survey. The Meal IQ was validated against calculated nutrient contents of school lunches both provided by the school and brought from home.
At eight public schools from all over Denmark, data were collected on 191 individual lunches brought from home (which is most common in Denmark) and thirty-one lunches provided as part of a school food programme. In addition thirty-two lunches provided at eighteen other public schools were included.
A total of 254 school lunches.
A higher Meal IQ score was associated with a higher overall dietary quality, including lower contents of fat, saturated fat and added sugars, higher contents of fibre, various vitamins and minerals, and more fruits, vegetables and fish.
The Meal IQ is a valid and useful evaluation tool for assessing the dietary quality of lunches provided by schools or brought to school from home.
PubMed ID
22717318 View in PubMed
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Health Locus of Control in Chukotka children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6184
Source
Alaska Med. 1992 Jul-Sep;34(3):135-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
E B Deaux
Author Affiliation
Southcentral Foundation, Anchorage, Alaska 99503.
Source
Alaska Med. 1992 Jul-Sep;34(3):135-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Siberia
Abstract
Two groups of children in the cities of Anadyr and Pevek in the Chukotka Region of the Soviet Far East were administered a Russian translation of the Children's Health Locus of Control Scale in July, 1991. Results were analyzed to assess the similarities between response patterns among the Russian children and those found in American children. The analyses revealed a consistency in the data suggesting both face and theoretical validity of the Scale. It appears that the underlying mediating variable related to the children's perceived control over their health is operating in this Region of Russia in much the same way that it does in the United States.
PubMed ID
1463126 View in PubMed
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[How to find and evaluate potentially useful research instruments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180972
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2004;14(1):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Priscilla M Koop
Author Affiliation
Faculté de médecine de l'Université de l'Alberta.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2004;14(1):8-9
Date
2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Humans
Oncology Nursing
Pediatric Nursing
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
PubMed ID
15040144 View in PubMed
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Subjective health literacy: Development of a brief instrument for school-aged children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286159
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 Dec;44(8):751-757
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Olli Paakkari
Minna Torppa
Lasse Kannas
Leena Paakkari
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 Dec;44(8):751-757
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Finland
Health Literacy
Humans
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The present paper focuses on the measurement of health literacy (HL), which is an important determinant of health and health behaviours. HL starts to develop in childhood and adolescence; hence, there is a need for instruments to monitor HL among younger age groups. These instruments are still rare. The aim of the project reported here was, therefore, to develop a brief, multidimensional, theory-based instrument to measure subjective HL among school-aged children.
The development of the instrument covered four phases: item generation based on a conceptual framework; a pilot study ( n = 405); test-retest ( n = 117); and construction of the instrument ( n = 3853). All the samples were taken from Finnish 7th and 9th graders.
Initially, 65 items were generated, of which 32 items were selected for the pilot study. After item reduction, the instrument contained 16 items. The test-retest phase produced estimates of stability. In the final phase a 10-item instrument was constructed, referred to as Health Literacy for School-Aged Children (HLSAC). The instrument exhibited a high Cronbach alpha (0.93), and included two items from each of the five predetermined theoretical components (theoretical knowledge, practical knowledge, critical thinking, self-awareness, citizenship).
The iterative and validity-driven development process made it possible to construct a brief multidimensional HLSAC instrument. Such instruments are suitable for large-scale studies, and for use with children and adolescents. Validation will require further testing for use in other countries.
PubMed ID
27655781 View in PubMed
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Reproducibility of domain-specific physical activity over two seasons in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302182
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 07 03; 18(1):821
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-03-2018
Author
Eivind Aadland
Lars Bo Andersen
Ulf Ekelund
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Author Affiliation
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Sogndal, Box 133, 6851, Sogndal, Norway. eivind.aadland@hvl.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 07 03; 18(1):821
Date
07-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Child
Exercise
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Seasons
Sedentary Behavior
Abstract
Knowledge of the reproducibility of domain-specific accelerometer-determined physical activity (PA) estimates are a prerequisite to conduct high-quality epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility of objectively measured PA level in children during school hours, afternoon hours, weekdays, weekend days, and total leisure time over two different seasons.
Six hundred seventy six children from the Active Smarter Kids study conducted in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway, were monitored for 7 days by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X+) during January-February and April-May 2015. Reproducibility was estimated week-by-week using intra-class correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots with 95% limits of agreement (LoA).
When controlling for season, reliability (ICC) was 0.51-0.66 for a 7-day week, 0.55-0.64 for weekdays, 0.11-0.43 for weekend days, 0.57-0.63 for school hours, 0.42-0.53 for afternoon hours, and 0.42-0.61 for total leisure time. LoA across models approximated a factor of 1.3-2.5 standard deviations of the sample PA levels. 3-6 weeks of monitoring were required to achieve a reliability of 0.80 across all domains but weekend days, which required 5-32 weeks.
Reproducibility of PA during leisure time and weekend days were lower than for school hours and weekdays, and estimates were lower when analyzed using a week-by-week approach over different seasons compared to previous studies relying on a single short monitoring period. To avoid type 2-errors, researchers should consider increasing the monitoring period beyond a single 7-day period in future studies.
ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT021324947 . Registered on 7 April 2014.
PubMed ID
29970050 View in PubMed
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Magnetic resonance imaging and joint outcomes in boys with severe hemophilia A treated with tailored primary prophylaxis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119843
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2012 Dec;10(12):2494-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
J. Kraft
V. Blanchette
P. Babyn
B. Feldman
S. Cloutier
S. Israels
M. Pai
G-E Rivard
S. Gomer
M. McLimont
R. Moineddin
A S Doria
Author Affiliation
Clarendon Wing Radiology Department, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, UK.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2012 Dec;10(12):2494-502
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Hemophilia A - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Joints - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Tailored primary prophylaxis (TPP) is a reduced-intensity treatment program for hemophiliacs with the goal of preventing arthropathy. Our primary aim was to evaluate the joint outcomes of treated subjects using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and physical examination as outcome measures.
Ankles, elbows and knees (index joints) of 24 subjects (median [range] age at start of therapy, 1.6 [1-2.5] years) with severe hemophilia A enrolled in the Canadian Hemophilia Primary Prophylaxis Study (CHPS) were examined by MRI at a median age of 8.8 years (range 6.2-11.5 years). Subjects were treated with TPP using a recombinant factor VIII concentrate, starting once weekly and escalating in frequency and dose according to frequency of bleeding.
Osteochondral changes (cartilage loss/subchondral bone damage) were detected in 9% (13/140) of the index joints and 50% (12/24) of study subjects. Osteochondral changes were restricted to joints with a history of clinically reported joint bleeding. Soft tissue changes were detected in 31% (20/65) of index joints with no history of clinically reported bleeding (ankles 75% (12/16); elbows 19% (6/32); and knees 12% (2/17)). In these apparently 'bleed free' index joints hemosiderin deposition was detected by MRI in 26% (17/65) of joints (ankles 63% (10/16); elbows 16% (5/32), and knees 12% (2/17)).
TPP did not completely avoid the development of MRI-detected structural joint changes in hemophilic boys in this prospective study. A longer period of follow-up is required for assessment of the longitudinal course of these early changes in hemophilic arthropathy, detected using a sensitive imaging technique (MRI).
PubMed ID
23067060 View in PubMed
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Are responsibility attitudes related to obsessive-compulsive symptoms in schoolchildren?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30260
Source
Cogn Behav Ther. 2004;33(1):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Iounn Magnúsdóttir
Jakob Smári
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Cogn Behav Ther. 2004;33(1):21-6
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Social Responsibility
Students - psychology
Abstract
In spite of a growth in cognitive conceptualizations of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, relatively little has been done to extend such concepts to childhood. This study investigated the relationship between responsibility attitudes and obsessive-compulsive symptoms in normal children. A measure of responsibility attitudes in children was constructed on the basis of Salkovskis' Responsibility Attitudes Scale. This measure (Responsibility Attitudes Scale for Children) was administered together with the Leyton Obsessive Inventory Child Version and the Children's Depression Inventory to a sample of two hundred and two 10-14-year-old schoolchildren in Iceland. The responsibility measure correlated moderately and similarly with the Leyton Obsessive Inventory Child Version and the Children's Depression Inventory. In a hierarchical regression analysis predicting Leyton Obsessive Inventory Child Version scores, age and gender were entered in the equation first, followed by Children's Depression Inventory scores and, finally, Responsibility Attitudes Scale for Children scores. It was shown that Responsibility Attitudes Scale for Children scores added significantly to the prediction of Leyton Obsessive Inventory Child Version over and above the other variables. It is concluded that the study of the role of responsibility attitudes in children's obsessive-compulsive symptoms is at least promising.
PubMed ID
15224625 View in PubMed
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The Danish Communicative Developmental Inventories: validity and main developmental trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92876
Source
J Child Lang. 2008 Aug;35(3):651-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Bleses Dorthe
Vach Werner
Slott Malene
Wehberg Sonja
Thomsen Pia
Madsen Thomas O
Basbøll Hans
Author Affiliation
Center for Child Language, Institute of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. bleses@.sdu.dk
Source
J Child Lang. 2008 Aug;35(3):651-69
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Communication
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Language Development
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Speech Production Measurement
Verbal Learning
Abstract
This paper presents a large-scale cross-sectional study of Danish children's early language acquisition based on the Danish adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI). Measures of validity and reliability imply that the Danish adaptation of the American CDI has been adjusted linguistically and culturally in appropriate ways which makes it suitable for tapping into Danish children's language acquisition. The study includes 6,112 randomly selected children in the age of 0 ; 8 to 3 ; 0, and results related to the development of early gestures, comprehension and production of words as well as grammatical skills, are presented.
PubMed ID
18588718 View in PubMed
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The Hubble hypothesis and the developmentalist's dilemma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208803
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 1997;9(2):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J E Richters
Author Affiliation
Child & Adolescent Disorder Branch, NIMH, Rockville, MD 20857, USA. jrichter@NIH.gov
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 1997;9(2):193-9
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Child
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology
Models, Psychological
Personality Development
Psychopathology
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Spacecraft
Abstract
Developmental psychopathology stands poised at the close of the 20th century on the horns of a major scientific dilemma. The essence of this dilemma lies in the contrast between its heuristically rich open system concepts on the one hand, and the closed system paradigm it adopted from mainstream psychology for investigating those models on the other. Many of the research methods, assessment strategies, and data analytic models of psychology's paradigm are predicated on closed system assumptions and explanatory models. Thus, they are fundamentally inadequate for studying humans, who are unparalleled among open systems in their wide ranging capacities for equifinal and multifinal functioning. Developmental psychopathology faces two challenges in successfully negotiating the developmentalist's dilemma. The first lies in recognizing how the current paradigm encourages research practices that are antithetical to developmental principles, yet continue to flourish. I argue that the developmentalist's dilemma is sustained by long standing, mutually enabling weaknesses in the paradigm's discovery methods and scientific standards. These interdependent weaknesses function like a distorted lens on the research process by variously sustaining the illusion of theoretical progress, obscuring the need for fundamental reforms, and both constraining and misguiding reform efforts. An understanding of how these influences arise and take their toll provides a foundation and rationale for engaging the second challenge. The essence of this challenge will be finding ways to resolve the developmentalist's dilemma outside the constraints of the existing paradigm by developing indigenous research strategies, methods, and standards with fidelity to the complexity of developmental phenomena.
PubMed ID
9201442 View in PubMed
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722 records – page 1 of 73.