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Reliability of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire among Finnish 4-9-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126379
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anne-Mari Borg
Pälvi Kaukonen
Raili Salmelin
Matti Joukamaa
Tuula Tamminen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Department of Child Psychiatry, Finland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-13
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Child, Preschool
Faculty
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Early recognition of children's mental health problems calls for structured methods in front line services. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a commonly used short questionnaire in screening child's mental difficulties.
To test the reliability and descriptive properties of the SDQ in a community sample of Finnish 4-9-year-old children (n =?4178).
Both parents, two teachers in day-care or a teacher at school completed the SDQ. To control for possible bias, public health nurses rated their concern about every child's mental health, including non-participants.
The internal consistencies of the SDQ total score in all informants' reports were satisfactory to good. Agreement (Spearman rho) in total scores between parents was 0.65, between parent and teacher 0.43 and between two teachers in day-care 0.81. The stability in parent's reports over 12 weeks was good. The distributions of the informant-rated scores indicated significant and clinically important gender differences, and the 80th and 90th percentiles were generally below the international cut-off points. Public health nurses reported emotional or behavioural difficulties more commonly in non-participants (12%) than in participants (7%; p
PubMed ID
22397524 View in PubMed
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Psychometric properties of the Danish Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire: the SDQ assessed for more than 70,000 raters in four different cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126515
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32025
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Janni Niclasen
Thomas William Teasdale
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Anne Mette Skovgaard
Hanne Elberling
Carsten Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Janni.niclasen@psy.ku.dk
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e32025
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Emotions
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Observer Variation
Parents
Principal Component Analysis
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Schools
Abstract
The Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a brief behavioural five factor instrument developed to assess emotional and behavioural problems in children and adolescents. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties for parent and teacher ratings in the Danish version of SDQ for different age groups of boys and girls.
The Danish versions of the SDQ were distributed to a total of 71,840 parent and teacher raters of 5-, 7- and 10- to 12-year-old children included in four large scale Danish cohorts. The internal reliability was assessed and exploratory factor analyses were carried out to replicate the originally proposed five factor structure. Mean scores and percentiles were examined in order to differentiate between low, medium and high levels of emotional and behavioural difficulties.
The original five factor structure could be substantially confirmed. The Conduct items however did not solely load on the proposed Conduct scale and the Conduct scale was further contaminated by non-conduct items. Positively worded items tended to load on the Prosocial scale. This was more so the case for teachers than for parents. Parent and teacher means and percentiles were found to be lower compared to British figures but similar to or only slightly lower than those found in the other Nordic countries. The percentiles for girls were generally lower than for boys, markedly so for the teacher hyperactivity ratings.
The study supports the usefulness of the SDQ as a screening tool for boys and girls across age groups and raters in the general Danish population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384129 View in PubMed
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Validity of a single item food security questionnaire in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104271
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helga Bjørnøy Urke
Zhirong R Cao
Grace M Egeland
Source
Pediatrics. 2014 Jun;133(6):e1616-23
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Assess sensitivity and specificity of each of the 18 US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Household Food Security Scale Module (HFSSM) questionnaire items to determine whether a rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible in an Inuit population.
Food insecurity prevalence was assessed by the 18-item USDA HFSSM in a randomized sample of Inuit households participating in the Inuit Health Survey and the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. Questions were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, predictive value (+/2), and total percent accuracy for adult and child food insecurity (yes/no). Child food security items were evaluated for both surveys.
For children, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when it was not possible to feed the children a healthy meal because there was not enough money?” had the best performance in both samples with a sensitivity and specificity of 92.3% and 97.3%, respectively, for the Inuit Health Survey, and 88.5% and 95.4% for the Nunavut Inuit Child Health Survey. For adults, the question “In the last 12 months, were there times when the food for you and your family just did not last and there was no money to buy more?” demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 93.4%.
Rapid assessment of child and adult food insecurity is feasible and may be a useful tool for health care and social service providers. However, as prevalence and severity of food insecurity change over time, rapid assessment techniques should not replace periodic screening by using the full USDA HFSSM questionnaire.
PubMed ID
24864166 View in PubMed
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[Peculiarities of vanadium determinaion in whole blood by ICP-MS].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104479
Source
Biomed Khim. 2014 Jan-Feb;60(1):109-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
T S Ulanova
O V Gileva
E V Stenno
G A Veikhman
Source
Biomed Khim. 2014 Jan-Feb;60(1):109-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Specimen Collection
Child, Preschool
Environmental pollutants - blood
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Metallurgy
Reference Standards
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Vanadium - blood
Abstract
The parameters of vanadium determination by ICP-MS in whole blood are presented. Conditions for blood sample preparation to reduce measure errors and to determine vanadium at the reference concentration level were optimized. The accuracy of the results is confirmed by analysis of standard blood samples Seronorm L1, L2 and L3. Vanadium mean in whole blood for the group of children from the town of Chusovoy (n = 80) was 1.29 +/- 0.45 microg/L, and vanadium mean for grown-ups from the town of Chusovoy was 1.63 +/- 0.25 microg/L.
PubMed ID
24749251 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the interpretation of serial ultrasound examinations in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis in children: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104672
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2014 Aug;65(3):218-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Michael Stamm
Anna Zavodni
Lesley Mitchell
John Ross Bonanni
Michelle Noga
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2014 Aug;65(3):218-24
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Abstract
To assess ultrasound intrascan variability and the potential error rate of serial ultrasounds in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis in children.
A retrospective cohort review of imaging results of children having at least 3 serial ultrasound examinations of the same region within a 2-month period. The results were interpreted as either (1) inadequately visualized or (2) the absence or presence of deep venous thrombosis, and were categorized by location. Serial imaging findings then were further categorized based on results and clinical information.
Sixty-four patients and 157 vessel segments were included in the study. Deep venous thrombosis was documented in 58 patients. Concordant results were observed in 26 patients (40.1%), clot resolution in 17 patients (26.6%), clot formation in 12 patients (18.8%), and discordant results in 9 patients (14%). Twenty-one of 64 patients (32.8%) had at least 1 vessel inadequately imaged.
The inconsistency of serial ultrasound results in up to 25% of patients calls attention to the potential inaccuracy of ultrasound for diagnosis and follow-up of deep venous thrombosis in children. The high proportion of patients with at least 1 inadequately visualized vessel also highlights the limitation of ultrasound in the diagnosis of pediatric deep venous thrombosis.
PubMed ID
24650872 View in PubMed
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Infant attachment and toddlers' sleep assessed by maternal reports and actigraphy: different measurement methods yield different relations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116146
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 2013 Jun;38(5):473-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Valérie Simard
Annie Bernier
Marie-Ève Bélanger
Julie Carrier
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Université de Sherbrooke (campus Longueuil), 150 place Charles-Le Moyne, Bureau 200, Longueuil, QC, Canada, J4K 0A8. valerie.simard@usherbrooke.ca
Source
J Pediatr Psychol. 2013 Jun;38(5):473-83
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - methods
Canada
Child Behavior - physiology - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior - physiology - psychology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mother-Child Relations - psychology
Mothers
Object Attachment
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sleep - physiology
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate relations between children's attachment and sleep, using objective and subjective sleep measures. Secondarily, to identify the most accurate actigraphy algorithm for toddlers.
55 mother-child dyads took part in the Strange Situation Procedure (18 months) to assess attachment. At 2 years, children wore an Actiwatch for a 72-hr period, and their mothers completed a sleep diary.
The high sensitivity (80) and smoothed actigraphy algorithms provided the most plausible sleep data. Maternal diaries yielded longer estimated sleep duration and shorter wake duration at night and showed poor agreement with actigraphy. More resistant attachment behavior was not associated with actigraphy-assessed sleep, but was associated with longer nocturnal wake duration as estimated by mothers, and with a reduced actigraphy-diary discrepancy.
Mothers of children with resistant attachment are more aware of their child's nocturnal awakenings. Researchers and clinicians should select the best sleep measurement method for their specific needs.
PubMed ID
23428653 View in PubMed
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Growth references for 0-19 year-old Norwegian children for length/height, weight, body mass index and head circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116292
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2013 May;40(3):220-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Pétur B Júlíusson
Mathieu Roelants
Eirin Nordal
Liv Furevik
Geir Egil Eide
Dag Moster
Roland Hauspie
Robert Bjerknes
Author Affiliation
Section for Paediatrics, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. petur.juliusson@med.uib.no
Source
Ann Hum Biol. 2013 May;40(3):220-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cephalometry
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Head - growth & development
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Young Adult
Abstract
Previous growth references for Norwegian children were based on measurements from the 1970s and 1980s. New reference data, collected through the Bergen Growth Study and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, are presented as LMS values.
A cross-sectional sample of children aged 0-19 years in stratified randomized design measured in 2003-2006 as a part of the Bergen Growth Study (n = 7291) and birth data of children born in 1999-2003 from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (n = 12 576) was used to estimate the new references by the means of the LMS method. Measurement reliability was assessed by test-rest studies.
New references were constructed for length/height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and head circumference. Length/height and weight for children aged 0-4 years were similar to previous Norwegian references, but mean height increased up to a maximum of 3.4 cm in boys and 2.5 cm in girls during the pubertal years. Mean height was similar to (or slightly higher) in comparison with other recent European references. Reliability of the measurements compared well with published estimates.
Because of the observed secular trends in growth, it is advised to use the new references, which have been endorsed by the Norwegian Department of Health.
PubMed ID
23414181 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Patti Pics and Lea Symbols optotypes in children and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116630
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 2013 Mar;90(3):236-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Michele E Mercer
James R Drover
Kaitlin J Penney
Mary L Courage
Russell J Adams
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Faculties of Science and Medicine, Memorial University, St John's, Newfoundland, Canada. michelem@mun.ca
Source
Optom Vis Sci. 2013 Mar;90(3):236-41
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amblyopia - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Pattern Recognition, Visual - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Vision Screening - methods
Vision Tests - methods
Visual acuity
Young Adult
Abstract
Although a great variety of pediatric tests of visual acuity exist, few have been compared directly within the same patients or have been evaluated directly against an adult gold standard.
Right eyes from 80 3- to 5-year-old preschoolers were tested at 3 m with the two current pediatric optotype tests-the Patti Pics and the Lea Symbols (Mass VAT versions)-that best adhere to the international standard for early eye and vision screening. For comparison, right eyes from 52 adults were tested under the same conditions with both pediatric tests and with a gold standard Mass VAT Sloan letter test.
Compared with the Patti Pics, both children and adults showed relatively better and finer levels of visual acuity with Lea Symbols (0.07-0.11 logMAR better). Compared with Sloan letters, adults' acuity was also 0.09 logMAR better with the Lea Symbols but was virtually identical and also showed good statistical agreement with Patti Pics acuity.
Although both pediatric tests show excellent testability, our data suggest that acuity values obtained with the Patti Pics optotypes are more consistent with those obtained with a gold standard visual acuity test used for older children and adults.
PubMed ID
23376895 View in PubMed
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Diphtheria-tetanus overimmunization in children with no records: can it be prevented?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229652
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Dec 15;141(12):1241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1989
Author
J W Frank
R. Schabas
R. Arshinoff
R. Brant
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Dec 15;141(12):1241-6
Date
Dec-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Diphtheria - immunology
Diphtheria Toxoid - administration & dosage
Disease Susceptibility
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Records as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Skin Tests - methods
Tetanus - immunology
Tetanus Toxoid - administration & dosage
Vaccination
Abstract
A pilot study was undertaken to assess the validity of two new tests for predicting the immune response of Toronto schoolchildren with no acceptable evidence of prior administration of diphtheria or tetanus toxoid to a routine booster injection of diphtheria and tetanus (DT) toxoid. The tests, an inexpensive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) fingerprick test for tetanus antibodies and a modification of the Schick skin test for susceptibility to diphtheria, were administered before the booster injection. One week later the ELISA test was repeated and the result of the modified Schick test read. On both occasions a diphtheria microneutralization assay was done for "gold standard" evidence of prior exposure to diphtheria toxoid or toxin. The results were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a single prebooster tetanus ELISA test or a modified Schick test for predicting which children with no records could be safely protected with only one DT booster dose instead of the primary series of three or four doses usually given to such children. Only 6 of the 34 subjects (18%) were totally without prior exposure to tetanus toxoid. Two of the six (6% of 33 subjects) appeared to mount a primary immune response to diphtheria toxoid as well. An initial ELISA titre of 0.01 IU/ml or lower correctly identified all six children needing a full series of tetanus toxoid (sensitivity for a primary immune response 100%) and falsely identified only 3 of 28 immune children as needing the series (specificity for immunity 89.3%). The modified Schick test appeared to have even greater accuracy for identifying children needing a full series of diphtheria toxoid. However, its use, entailing the costs of an extra nurse visit, would have prevented only seven more children from receiving an unnecessary full series of diphtheria toxoid than use of the baseline tetanus ELISA test alone.
Notes
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PubMed ID
2590890 View in PubMed
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A speech reception in noise test for preschool children (the Galker-test): Validity, reliability and acceptance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272001
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2015 Oct;79(10):1694-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Maj-Britt Glenn Lauritsen
Svend Kreiner
Margareta Söderström
Jens Dørup
Jørgen Lous
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2015 Oct;79(10):1694-701
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiometry
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Hearing Tests
Humans
Male
Noise
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Regression (Psychology)
Reproducibility of Results
Speech
Speech Perception - physiology
Speech Reception Threshold Test - methods
Abstract
This study evaluates initial validity and reliability of the "Galker test of speech reception in noise" developed for Danish preschool children suspected to have problems with hearing or understanding speech against strict psychometric standards and assesses acceptance by the children.
The Galker test is an audio-visual, computerised, word discrimination test in background noise, originally comprised of 50 word pairs. Three hundred and eighty eight children attending ordinary day care centres and aged 3-5 years were included. With multiple regression and the Rasch item response model it was examined whether the total score of the Galker test validly reflected item responses across subgroups defined by sex, age, bilingualism, tympanometry, audiometry and verbal comprehension.
A total of 370 children (95%) accepted testing and 339 (87%) completed all 50 items. The analysis showed that 35 items fitted the Rasch model. Reliability was 0.75 before and after exclusion of the 15 non-fitting items. In the stepwise linear regression model age group of children could explain 20% of the variation in Galker-35-score, sex 1%, second language at home 4%, tympanometry in best ear 2%, and parental education another 2%. Other variable did not reach significance.
The Galker-35 was well accepted by children down to the age of 3 years and results indicate that the scale represents construct valid and reliable measurement.
PubMed ID
26260661 View in PubMed
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337 records – page 1 of 34.