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Speech and language development in a population of Swedish hearing-impaired pre-school children, a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163478
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2007 Jul;71(7):1061-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Erik Borg
Gertrud Edquist
Anna-Clara Reinholdson
Arne Risberg
Bob McAllister
Author Affiliation
Ahlsén Research Institute, Orebro University Hospital, S-701 85 Orebro, Sweden. erik.borg@orebroll.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2007 Jul;71(7):1061-77
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Development - physiology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hearing - physiology
Hearing Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - physiopathology
History, 15th Century
Humans
Infant
Judgment
Language
Male
Nonverbal Communication
Parent-Child Relations
Phonetics
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Speech
Sweden
Abstract
There is little information on speech and language development in pre-school children with mild, moderate or severe hearing impairment. The primary aim of the study is to establish a reference material for clinical use covering various aspects of speech and language functions and to relate test values to pure tone audiograms and parents' judgement of their children's hearing and language abilities.
Nine speech and language tests were applied or modified, both classical tests and newly developed tests. Ninety-seven children with normal hearing and 156 with hearing impairment were tested. Hearing was 80 dB HL PTA or better in the best ear. Swedish was their strongest language. None had any additional diagnosed major handicaps. The children were 4-6 years of age. The material was divided into 10 categories of hearing impairment, 5 conductive and 5 sensorineural: unilateral; bilateral 0-20; 21-40; 41-60; 61-80 dB HL PTA. The tests, selected on the basis of a three component language model, are phoneme discrimination; rhyme matching; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT-III, word perception); Test for Reception of Grammar (TROG, grammar perception); prosodic phrase focus; rhyme construction; Word Finding Vocabulary Test (word production); Action Picture Test (grammar production); oral motor test.
Only categories with sensorineural loss showed significant differences from normal. Word production showed the most marked delay for 21-40 dB HL: 5 and 6 years p
PubMed ID
17512613 View in PubMed
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Language development in hearing-impaired children. Establishment of a reference material for a 'Language test for hearing-impaired children', LATHIC.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31457
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Aug 1;65(1):15-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2002
Author
Erik Borg
Arne Risberg
Bob McAllister
Britt Marie Undemar
Gertrud Edquist
Anna-Clara Reinholdson
Anna Wiking-Johnsson
Ursula Willstedt-Svensson
Author Affiliation
Ahlsén Research Institute, Orebro University Hospital, Sweden. erik.borg@orebroll.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Aug 1;65(1):15-26
Date
Aug-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Humans
Language Development
Language Tests
Male
Probability
Reference Values
Rehabilitation of Hearing Impaired - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Perception
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Verbal Behavior
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, there has previously been no normalised test material for the evaluation of language development in individual hearing-impaired children, and for the assessment of various methods of auditory habilitation. The purpose of the present study was to compose, apply and evaluate a test for language development in hearing-impaired children, and to establish the first set of reference values related to age, sex, type and degree of hearing impairment. METHODS: A test consisting of nine subtests was assembled and developed for, and subsequently applied to, hearing-impaired children in the age range 4-6 years. The inclusion criteria were a pure tone average of 80 dBHL or less and oral language (Swedish) as the first language. Two hundred and eleven hearing-impaired children and 87 normal hearing control children were tested. RESULTS: The results show that: (1) children with hearing impairment-also unilateral-have a delayed language development; (2) the delay is greater in children with larger losses and tends to decrease with increasing age; (3) 6-year-olds with hearing loss greater than 60 dB have not reached the level of the control group; (4) no difference between right- or left sided deafness with respect to language development was observed; (5) a reference material, applicable during clinical assessment, was established for the most common types of hearing impairment. CONCLUSIONS: The test designed gave graded measures of important aspects of language development in hearing-impaired children. The results merit further application of the test material.
PubMed ID
12127218 View in PubMed
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