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1820 records – page 1 of 182.

Development and validation of a demographic correction system for neuropsychological measures used in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211350
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 1996 Aug;18(4):479-616
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
H. Tuokko
T S Woodward
Author Affiliation
Centre on Aging, University of Victoria, Canada.
Source
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 1996 Aug;18(4):479-616
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - psychology
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
8877629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Reliability of perceived health by sex and age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201660
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 Apr;48(8):1117-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
P. Martikainen
A. Aromaa
M. Heliövaara
T. Klaukka
P. Knekt
J. Maatela
E. Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland. pekka@public-health.ucl.ac.uk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 Apr;48(8):1117-22
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability of a measure of perceived general health by sex and age. The study analyzed data from the nationally representative Mini-Finland Health Survey of 8000 adults aged 30 and over. The subjects were invited to attend a personal health interview and a health examination in 1978-1980. Altogether 7217 persons participated. Perceived general health was measured at the personal health interview and in the self-administered questionnaire 1-6 weeks apart. The identical questions were: how would you assess your current health? The response alternatives were good, fairly good, intermediate, fairly poor, poor and cannot say. This study showed that among men and women unweighted agreement of the 'good-intermediate-poor' categorization of perceived health was around 70% and unweighted kappa-values were around 0.5. Only in the oldest age-group (75+) reliability declined below these levels. The fair or good reliability of perceived health observed in this study gives additional confidence for using this general measure of overall health status in future research.
PubMed ID
10390049 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of self-reported birthweight among middle-aged and elderly women in the Danish Nurse Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141165
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Sep;89(9):1134-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Pernille M Wodskou
Yrsa A Hundrup
Erik B Obel
Torben Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Glostrup University Hospital, Denmark. pwod0002@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Sep;89(9):1134-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Birth weight
Denmark
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
To investigate the validity of self-reported birthweight among middle-aged and elderly women and to identify possible determinants of reporting accuracy.
The Danish Nurse Cohort Study (DNCS), a prospective risk factor and hormone therapy study.
Participants in the 1999 DNCS.
Self-reported exact and categorical birthweight data from the DNCS was compared with data from the Copenhagen School Health Records Register (CSHRR), which contains birthweight data.
Accuracy of self-reported birthweight expressed as mean difference with limits of agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV).
Exact birthweight was available for 441 participants. The correlation coefficient was 0.83. The mean difference was -21 g and limits of agreement were -843 to 818 g. A total of 74% answered correctly within 250 g while 7% were more than 500 g in error. Categorical birthweight was available for 925 participants. A total of 87% reported the correct birthweight. Sensitivity and PPV were high for normal birthweight, whereas specificity and NPV were better for high and low birthweight (HBW and LBW). Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that HBW, LBW and being the daughter of a young mother decreased the accuracy of self-reported birthweight.
Self-reported birthweight is a valid measure of actual birthweight among middle-aged and elderly women. Due to the lower accuracy of HBW and LBW, studies of the association between birthweight and chronic disease may underestimate the true effect of these weights.
PubMed ID
20804338 View in PubMed
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Relatives' view on collaboration with nurses in acute wards: development and testing of a new measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93673
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Sep;45(9):1329-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Lindhardt Tove
Nyberg Per
Hallberg Ingalill Rahm
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Gentofte University Hospital, Ledreborg Allé 40, 2.tv., DK-2820 Gentofte, Denmark. tovelin@mail.tele.dk
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2008 Sep;45(9):1329-43
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cooperative Behavior
Family
Female
Frail Elderly
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Collaboration between relatives and nurses in acute care settings is sparsely investigated, and that mostly from nurses' point of view. Feasible and valid instruments are needed for assessing collaboration, its prerequisites and outcome. OBJECTIVES: To develop and test an instrument to assess, from the relatives' perspective, collaboration between relatives of frail elderly patients and nurses in acute hospital wards, as well as prerequisites for, and outcome of, collaboration. DESIGN: Instrument development and psychometric testing. SETTING: Acute medical and geriatric wards. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fifty-six relatives. Women constituted 74.8%, offspring 63.9% and spouses 20%, respectively. METHODS: A model for collaboration was developed and underpinned the development and construction of the instrument. Face and content validity was examined by relatives and an expert panel, before testing it among 156 relatives. Construct validity was assessed by principal component analysis and test for correlation between factors. Predictive validity was assessed by comparing factor scores with scores in outcome measures. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha for factors, item-to-total correlation and item-to-item correlation. Systematic internal dropout was investigated. RESULTS: A five-factor solution labelled "influence on decisions", "quality of contact with nurses", "trust and its prerequisites", "achieved information level" and "influence on discharge" showed Cronbach's alpha values between .83 and .94. Correlation between factors showed coefficients between .16 and .60. Item-to-total correlation values ranged between .34 and .83 and mean inter-item-correlation coefficients between .40 and .56. Predictive validity was indicated. Systematic internal dropout was related to higher age and lower educational level. CONCLUSION: The instrument was mainly valid and reliable. The instrument is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and should be tested on larger samples in various cultural contexts. The feasibility of the instrument may benefit from a reduction of number of items.
PubMed ID
18255069 View in PubMed
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Older adult mistreatment risk screening: contribution to the validation of a screening tool in a domestic setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123904
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):235-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jeannette M Lindenbach
Sylvie Larocque
Anne-Marise Lavoie
Marie-Luce Garceau
Author Affiliation
Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. jm_lindenbach@laurentian.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):235-52
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Elder Abuse - diagnosis
Humans
Language
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
ABSTRACTThe hidden nature of older adult mistreatment renders its detection in the domestic setting particularly challenging. A validated screening instrument that can provide a systematic assessment of risk factors can facilitate this detection. One such instrument, the "expanded Indicators of Abuse" tool, has been previously validated in the Hebrew language in a hospital setting. The present study has contributed to the validation of the "e-IOA" in an English-speaking community setting in Ontario, Canada. It consisted of two phases: (a) a content validity review and adaptation of the instrument by experts throughout Ontario, and (b) an inter-rater reliability assessment by home visiting nurses. The adaptation, the "Mistreatment of Older Adult Risk Factors" tool, offers a comprehensive tool for screening in the home setting. This instrument is significant to professional practice as practitioners working with older adults will be better equipped to assess for risk of mistreatment.
PubMed ID
22647665 View in PubMed
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Reliability and validity of the Safety Assessment Scale for people with dementia living at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169384
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):67-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Courval Louise de Poulin
Isabelle Gélinas
Serge Gauthier
David Dayton
Lili Liu
Michel Rossignol
John Sampalis
Dolly Dastoor
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Côte-des-Neiges, Montreal. lpoulind@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):67-75
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Safety
Abstract
With the recent funding changes in health care services, more seniors with dementia are cared for in their homes and the nature of their condition puts them at higher risk for accidents and injuries.
The Safety Assessment Scale (SAS) was developed for use by community healthcare providers to evaluate and lower the risk of accidents, provide recommendations to family caregivers and enhance case management. Method. The scale was assessed in terms of the reliability as well as content, criterion and construct validity with 176 community-residing people with dementia in Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia. The Safety Assessment Scale was validated in French and English.
The SAS demonstrated an excellent test-retest (ICC=.91) and inter-rater (ICC=.88) reliability. Results for validity were also extremely good.
The scale is available in French and English. The short version of the SAS is a screening tool and the longer version provides an in-depth evaluation of safety and intervention planning. The SAS can be used by a variety of health care professionals who work with individuals who have dementia.
PubMed ID
16680910 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Danish registers of causes of death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72291
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Sep;46(4):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
K. Juel
K. Helweg-Larsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology, Copenhagen. kj@dike.dk
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Sep;46(4):354-7
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
In 1875 registration of causes of death in Denmark was established by the National Board of Health, and annual statistics of death have since been published. Until 1970 the national statistics were based upon punched cards with data collected from the death certificates. Since then the register has been fully computerized and includes individual based data of all deaths occurring among all residents in Denmark dying in Denmark. Furthermore, a microfilm of all death certificates from 1943 and onward is kept in the National Board of Health. The Danish Institute for Clinical Epidemiology (DICE) has established a computerized register of individual records of deaths in Denmark from 1943 and onwards. No other country covers computerized individual based data of death registration for such a long period, now 54 years. This paper describes the history of the registers, the data sources and access to data, and the research based upon the registers, presenting some examples of research activities.
PubMed ID
10514943 View in PubMed
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An explicit values clarification task: development and validation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168228
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Nov;63(3):350-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Deb Feldman-Stewart
Sarah Brennenstuhl
Michael D Brundage
Tom Roques
Author Affiliation
Cancer Research Institute, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada. deb-feldman-stewart@krcc.on.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Nov;63(3):350-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Decision Making
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Prostatic Neoplasms - therapy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
(a) To determine which of two values clarification exercises (VCE), based on theoretical decision rules used naturally by people, would be more helpful to patients making a treatment decision and (b) to evaluate the convergent validity of the most helpful VCE when part of a decision aid for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer.
Two studies were completed. Study 1: Ninety community volunteers were assigned at random to one of three groups and all made a hypothetical treatment decision. Two groups received VCEs, one with a summary and one without, and the third was a control group. Study 2: In a multi-centre phase II trial, 69 patients used the decision aid that included the exercise ranked most helpful in Study 1. Decision aid assessments included the decisional conflict scale, treatment valuation assessment and regret.
Study 1: Most participants in each group ranked the VCE with the summary as most helpful. Study 2: VCE outputs, such as the size of the summary, were associated in predictable ways with the decision aid assessments.
The VCE ranked most helpful in Study 1 showed convergent validity with decision aid assessments.
With the interpretation of the VCE outputs now validated, a randomized controlled trial is required to determine if the exercise helps patients more than the aid without the exercise.
PubMed ID
16860521 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer screening in Iceland: preliminary results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25340
Source
Recent Results Cancer Res. 1990;119:94-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
B F Sigfússon
P. Hallgrímsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Mammography, Cancer Detection Clinic, Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavik.
Source
Recent Results Cancer Res. 1990;119:94-9
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Iceland
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
2236868 View in PubMed
Less detail

The validity of performance assessments using simulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193972
Source
Anesthesiology. 2001 Jul;95(1):36-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
J H Devitt
M M Kurrek
M M Cohen
D. Cleave-Hogg
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Ontario, Canada. exhd@qe2-hsc.ns.ca
Source
Anesthesiology. 2001 Jul;95(1):36-42
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anesthesia
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Computer simulation
Humans
Intraoperative Complications - therapy
Male
Patient Simulation
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The authors wished to determine whether a simulator-based evaluation technique assessing clinical performance could demonstrate construct validity and determine the subjects' perception of realism of the evaluation process.
Research ethics board approval and informed consent were obtained. Subjects were 33 university-based anesthesiologists, 46 community-based anesthesiologists, 23 final-year anesthesiology residents, and 37 final-year medical students. The simulation involved patient evaluation, induction, and maintenance of anesthesia. Each problem was scored as follows: no response to the problem, score = 0; compensating intervention, score = 1; and corrective treatment, score = 2. Examples of problems included atelectasis, coronary ischemia, and hypothermia. After the simulation, participants rated the realism of their experience on a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS).
After testing for internal consistency, a seven-item scenario remained. The mean proportion scoring correct answers (out of 7) for each group was as follows: university-based anesthesiologists = 0.53, community-based anesthesiologists = 0.38, residents = 0.54, and medical students = 0.15. The overall group differences were significant (P
PubMed ID
11465581 View in PubMed
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1820 records – page 1 of 182.