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The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale for measuring disability: Its utility in international comparisons

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14362
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
  1 website  
Author
Suurmeijer, TP
Doeglas, DM
Moum, T
Briançon, S
Krol, B
R. Sanderman, R
F. Guillemin
A. Bjelle
W J van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre for Health Care Research, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - classification - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Evaluation Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
France
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) is a non-disease-specific instrument to measure disability in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). It was developed in studies of Dutch samples consisting of elderly or chronically ill people. The psychometric properties of the GARS demonstrated in these studies were highly satisfactory. This paper addresses the psychometric properties of the GARS across countries. METHODS. Data of 623 patients with recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis from four European countries were analyzed by means of a principal components analysis and a Mokken scale analysis for polychotomous items. RESULTS. The results of the analyses were highly satisfactory: there was one strong and reliable general factor representing one underlying dimension of disability in ADL and IADL, and there was a clear hierarchical ordering of the items included in the GARS. The validity of the GARS was strongly suggested by the pattern of associations of the GARS with age, sex, and other existing health status measures. CONCLUSIONS. The psychometric characteristics of the GARS, which measures disability in ADL and IADL simultaneously, make this instrument very useful for comparative research across countries.
PubMed ID
8059884 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Infant mortality among the Inuit (Eskimos) after World War II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1488
Source
Genus. 1989 Jul-Dec; 45(3-4):55-64.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
Legare, J.
Source
Genus. 1989 Jul-Dec; 45(3-4):55-64.
Date
1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Alaska
Americas
Canada
Child Nutrition
Child Welfare
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Data Collection
Delivery of Health Care
Demography
Developed Countries
Ethnic Groups
Greenland
Health
Health services
Infant mortality
Inuits
Mortality
North America
Nutrition
Politics
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Reproducibility of Results
Research
Research Design
USSR
United States
Abstract
The author examines infant mortality trends among the Inuit in Greenland, Canada, Alaska, and the USSR since World War II. Differences are analyzed in terms of data reliability and lifestyles, particularly child nutrition, health care systems, and political involvement. (Summary in French and Italian)
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1422.
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