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Errors in gestational age: Evidence of bleeding early in pregnancy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64126
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):213-218
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
  1 website  
Author
Gjessing, HK
Skjaerven, R
Wilcox, AJ
Author Affiliation
Division for Medical Statistics, University of Bergen, Norway. hakon.gjessing@smis.uib.no
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):213-218
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Birth weight
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Menstruation
Normal Distribution
Norway
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study explored the extent of errors in gestational age as ascertained by last menstrual period. METHODS: More than 1.5 million birth records (covering the years 1967-1994) from the population-based Medical Birth Registry of Norway were used to study variation in gestational age within strata of birthweight. RESULTS: Within 100-g strata of birthweight, it was found that the observed gestational age distribution could be divided into 3 distinct underlying distributions separated by approximately 4 weeks. This pattern was present through all birthweight strata, from 200 g up to 4700 g. In addition, the apparent misclassification causing a gestational age 4 weeks too short was much more common among low-birthweight births than among heavier births. CONCLUSIONS: The separation of the gestational age distributions by intervals of close to 4 weeks suggests that errors in gestational age measurements are caused by factors related to menstrual bleeding. Furthermore, there is evidence for a strong relation between bleeding at the time of the next menstrual period after conception and low birthweight. This conclusion should be approached with caution because of the retrospective nature of the data.
PubMed ID
9949752 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Lower respiratory tract infections among Norwegian infants with siblings in day care

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34633
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1456-1459
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
  1 website  
Author
Nafstad, P
Hagen, JA
Botten, G
Jaakkola, JJ
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1456-1459
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Day Care
Environmental Exposure
Family Health
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Nuclear Family
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the role of siblings in day care as a determinant of infants' risk of lower respiratory tract infections. METHODS: A total of 3238 children (86%) out of 3754 Oslo, Norway, newborns recruited in 1992/93 were followed for 1 year. RESULTS: In logistic regression analysis, the risk of infection was increased in (1) infants with one or more siblings compared with infants without siblings (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.84, 2.85) and (2) infants with one or more siblings in day care compared with infants with siblings not in day care (adjusted OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.21, 2.26). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that siblings in day care outside the home increase infants' risk of lower respiratory tract infections.
PubMed ID
8876520 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Effect of racial/ethnic misclassification of American Indians and Alaskan Natives on Washington State death certificates, 1989-1997

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6052
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Mar;92(3):443-444
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
  1 website  
Author
Stehr-Green, P
Bettles, J
Robertson, LD
Author Affiliation
Northwest Tribal Epidemiology Center (The EpiCenter), Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board, 527 SW Hall, Suite 300, Portland, OR 97201, USA.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Mar;92(3):443-444
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Algorithms
Cost of Illness
Death Certificates
Documentation - standards
Female
Hematologic Tests - standards
Humans
Idaho - epidemiology
Indians, North American - classification
Male
Medical Record Linkage - standards
Oregon - epidemiology
Probability
Quality Control
Registries - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined effects of racial/ethnic misclassification of American Indians and Alaskan Natives on Washington State death certificates. METHODS: Probabilistic record linkage were used to match the 1989-1997 state death files to the Northwest Tribal Registry. RESULTS: We identified matches for 2819 decedents, including 414 (14.7%) who had been misclassified as non-American Indians and Alaskan Natives on the death certificates. The likelihood of being correctly classified increased 3-fold for each higher level of American Indian and Alaskan Native ancestry (odds ratio = 2.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.51, 3.30) and decreased by 6.9% per calendar year (95% CI = 2.0, 11.5). CONCLUSIONS: Systematic biases on death certificates in Washington State persist. Methods to reduce misclassification can improve data quality and enhance efforts to measure and reduce racial/ethnic health disparities.
Notes
Comment In: American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Sep;92(9):138612197956
PubMed ID
11867327 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale for measuring disability: Its utility in international comparisons

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14362
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
  1 website  
Author
Suurmeijer, TP
Doeglas, DM
Moum, T
Briançon, S
Krol, B
R. Sanderman, R
F. Guillemin
A. Bjelle
W J van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre for Health Care Research, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - classification - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Evaluation Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
France
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) is a non-disease-specific instrument to measure disability in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). It was developed in studies of Dutch samples consisting of elderly or chronically ill people. The psychometric properties of the GARS demonstrated in these studies were highly satisfactory. This paper addresses the psychometric properties of the GARS across countries. METHODS. Data of 623 patients with recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis from four European countries were analyzed by means of a principal components analysis and a Mokken scale analysis for polychotomous items. RESULTS. The results of the analyses were highly satisfactory: there was one strong and reliable general factor representing one underlying dimension of disability in ADL and IADL, and there was a clear hierarchical ordering of the items included in the GARS. The validity of the GARS was strongly suggested by the pattern of associations of the GARS with age, sex, and other existing health status measures. CONCLUSIONS. The psychometric characteristics of the GARS, which measures disability in ADL and IADL simultaneously, make this instrument very useful for comparative research across countries.
PubMed ID
8059884 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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