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3M diffractive multifocal intraocular lens: eight year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50890
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Mar;26(3):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J E Slagsvold
Author Affiliation
Eye Department, ASA, Arendal, Norway.
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Mar;26(3):402-7
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aphakia, Postcataract - surgery
Capsulorhexis
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Phacoemulsification
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Postoperative Complications
Prosthesis Design
Refraction, Ocular
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the long-term results of implantation of the 3M diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL). SETTING: Eye Department, ASA, Arendal, Norway. METHODS: The study comprised 97 eyes in 72 patients. Follow-up was 8 years. Distance and near visual acuities, refractive results, contrast sensitivity, IOL centration, and neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) capsulotomies to treat posterior capsule opacification were evaluated. RESULTS: All patients without ocular pathology achieved a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 or better (i.e., 98.7% had a BCVA of 1.0 or better). Without correction, 73.8% of eyes had a Jaeger acuity of J3 or better and with distance correction, 92.1%. Emmetropia or within +/-0.25 diopter (D) of it was achieved in 58.8% of eyes. An astigmatic shift of 0.827 D cylinder correction was induced. This shift was mainly against the rule (0.717 D). Contrast sensitivity was reduced with spatial frequencies of 6 to 18 cycles per degree. No need for spectacles was reported by 54.2% of patients and by 68.0% of those with bilateral implantation. For near tasks, 63.9% of patients never used spectacles. The IOLs were well centered or minimally decentered in 99.0% of eyes. Posterior capsule opacification was treated by Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in 55.7% of eyes, with a mean time between surgery and treatment of 34.0 months +/- 23.2 (SD). CONCLUSION: This long-term study proved the 3M diffractive IOL to be safe and effective despite some reduction in contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequencies. More than half the patients never wore spectacles; 2 of 3 patients with IOLs in both eyes never wore spectacles. Proper patient selection is crucial.
PubMed ID
10713237 View in PubMed
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10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties: a report on 780 cases from the Swedish Ankle Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129819
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Anders Henricson
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Ake Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics , Falun Central Hospital and Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden. anders.henricson@ltdalarna.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle - adverse effects - methods
Cementation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Joint Prosthesis - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis.
Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint-excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus.
Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79-0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67-0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons.
The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements-even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results.
Notes
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003 Jul;85-A(7):1321-912851358
Cites: Foot Ankle Surg. 2011 Sep;17(3):99-10221783065
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2005 Mar;125(2):109-1915690167
Cites: Orthopade. 2006 May;35(5):527-3216598490
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2006 Jun;88(6):1272-8416757761
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):569-7417966014
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):575-8317966015
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):584-9117966016
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 May;90(5):605-918450626
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 Jul;90(7):885-818591597
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2009 Jan;91(1):69-7419092007
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2009 Jul;30(7):631-919589309
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Jan;468(1):199-20819618248
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Apr;468(4):951-719609630
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):10-420175657
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):114-820180720
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2010 Apr;31(4):301-520371016
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2010 Jul;92(7):958-6220595114
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2010 Sep 15;92(12):2150-520844156
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Dec;81(6):745-721067435
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Jan;469(1):225-3620593253
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2010 Dec;31(12):1048-5621189204
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2011 May;32(5):S493-50221733457
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2004 Jul;(424):73-915241146
PubMed ID
22066551 View in PubMed
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[20 years' experience with kidney transplantation in Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235401
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1987
Author
C G Groth
L. Ost
Source
Z Urol Nephrol. 1987 Apr;80(4):197-201
Date
Apr-1987
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cyclosporins - therapeutic use
Forecasting
Graft Rejection - drug effects
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - surgery
Kidney Transplantation
Postoperative Complications - surgery
Reoperation
Sweden
Abstract
Renal transplantations have now been carried out at our hospital for just over 20 years. The results have gradually improved and are now very satisfactory. There are many explanations for this development, but the improvement in immunosuppression has probably been the most crucial development. Renal transplantation is cheaper and it provides greater wellbeing for the patient than does chronic dialysis treatment. The indications have been widened and the number of patients waiting for a new kidney is increasing. An improved retrieval of cadaveric kidneys will be necessary for the required expansion of kidney transplantation programmes.
PubMed ID
3307211 View in PubMed
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40 years after the first atrial switch procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries: long-term results in Toronto and Zurich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197150
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Oechslin
R. Jenni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. erwin.oechslin@dim.usz.ch
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transposition of Great Vessels - complications - mortality - psychology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - mortality
Abstract
The atrial switch procedure dramatically improved the prognosis of children with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Overall actuarial survival was approximately 75% after 25 years and was better in patients with simple TGA than in those with complex TGA. Mortality by any cause (16%) and cardiovascular mortality (12% and 13%) were comparable in both centers. Progressive congestive heart failure and sudden death were the principal modes of death. Most of the survivors denied any symptoms or had mild limitations in their daily activities. However, long-term problems in this growing population of adults are challenging and include late arrhythmias (up to two thirds of the patients), systemic ventricular (SV) failure, systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and reoperations, such as baffle reconstruction, being the most frequent. Objective assessment of SV function obtained by echocardiography is difficult. It may include fractional area change and tricuspid annular motion. Survivors after an atrial switch procedure are unique and have a good quality of life. However, the definitive and true history of the RV supporting the systemic circulation is not as yet known.
PubMed ID
11005599 View in PubMed
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75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267766
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Holmberg
Valdís Gudrún Thórhallsdóttir
Otto Robertsson
Annette W-Dahl
Anna Stefánsdóttir
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods
Debridement - methods
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prosthesis-Related Infections - therapy
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Rifampin - therapeutic use
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Tibia - surgery
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement.
145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection.
The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2-10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8).
Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections.
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2013 Dec;84(6):509-1624171687
Cites: Infection. 2013 Apr;41(2):431-722987291
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2013 Aug;84(4):380-623848215
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2013 Sep;28(8 Suppl):120-123886410
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Nov;471(11):3672-823904245
Cites: Infection. 2003 Mar;31(2):99-10812682815
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2003 Nov;(416):129-3414646751
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Oct 14;351(16):1645-5415483283
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1981 Jan-Feb;(154):201-77009009
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Feb;75(2):282-98423191
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Dec;75(12):1844-528258558
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1537-419605897
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Nov;119(11):993.e7-1017071171
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Jun;63(6):1264-7119336454
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2010 Oct;25(7):1022-720378306
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Mar;17(3):439-4420412187
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Apr;469(4):970-620544317
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Apr;469(4):961-921080127
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Jun;17(6):862-720825437
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2011 Sep;26(6 Suppl):114-821621955
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Nov;469(11):2992-421938532
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2012 Dec;18(12):1176-8423046277
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(1):1-1023230301
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(2):182-9422942204
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jan;471(1):250-722552768
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2013 Jan;57(1):350-523114758
PubMed ID
25753311 View in PubMed
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[A 20-year follow-up of Danish coronary artery bypass patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215805
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 13;157(7):889-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-1995
Author
C A Bertelsen
K. Høier-Madsen
K. Folke
P F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Thoraxkirurgisk afdeling R., Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 13;157(7):889-92
Date
Feb-13-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
This study describes the influence of complete revascularization on the long term survival of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery. The patient population consists of 100 consecutive patients discharged from our department after undergoing a coronary bypass operation between November 1973 and July 1978. Patients who survived less than 30 days postoperatively are excluded from the study. The patient population consists of 87 males and 13 females. Mean age was 52.2 years at time of surgery. The rate of revascularization was estimated by coronary angiography, performed between one and 34 months postoperatively, in contrast to other similar studies found in the literature, where such estimation was performed peroperatively. Twenty-five of 86 patients were completely revascularized at postoperative angiographic estimation. Long term survival for the patient population and for the group of completely revascularized patients were compared to the expected survival of the Danish background population (comparable age and sex). Long term survival for the patient population as a whole was similar to that found in similar studies. There was an expected increased mortality compared to the Danish background population.
PubMed ID
7701650 View in PubMed
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The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
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[Accidents, complications and patients' complaints as causes for surgical corrections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209487
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 30;117(3):398-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1997

Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone grafting and cemented polyethylene socket in total hip revision arthroplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276221
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):267-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
I. Kostensalo
M. Seppänen
P. Virolainen
J. Mokka
M. Koivisto
K T Mäkelä
Source
Scand J Surg. 2015 Dec;104(4):267-72
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetabulum - surgery
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - mortality
Bone Cements
Bone Transplantation - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Polyethylene
Postoperative Complications
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Bone deficiency in revision total hip arthroplasty is a challenge to the surgeon. One option for restoration of the bone stock is impaction bone grafting and use of a cemented socket. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term clinical outcome of impaction bone grafting and cemented socket revisions.
A total of 59 patients (60 hips) underwent revision arthroplasty with impaction bone grafting and application of a cemented socket on the acetabular side in the Turku University Hospital from 1999 to 2004. The study end-point was re-revision for any reason. The cumulative percentages for survival were followed and estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Associations between occurrence of re-revision and potential risk factors were analyzed with logistic regression. Results were quantified by odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals. The mean age of the patients was 69 years (33% male). A total of 3% of the patients had a class I Paprosky acetabular defect, 38% had class II, and 55% had class III.
The overall survival rate was 73%. The mean follow-up time was 7 years. The most common reason for re-revision was aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (13 patients, 81% of re-revisions). Cox's regression analysis did not identify any risk factors for re-revision.
Our results were inferior compared to some previous studies. Impaction bone grafting of acetabular defects in revision total hip arthroplasty may not always provide a reliable bone stock in long-term.
PubMed ID
25681057 View in PubMed
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1042 records – page 1 of 105.