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163 records – page 1 of 17.

[Acid stability of erythrocytes in children with bronchial asthma]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16301
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1975;(5):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975

Alcohol and drug abusers' perceived reasons for self-change in Canada and Switzerland: computer-assisted content analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192643
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2001 Sep;36(11):1467-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
L C Sobell
H K Klingemann
T. Toneatto
M B Sobell
S. Agrawal
G I Leo
Author Affiliation
Center for Psychological Studies, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33314, USA. sobelll@nova.edu
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2001 Sep;36(11):1467-500
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior, Addictive - psychology - therapy
Canada
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological - methods
Male
Numerical Analysis, Computer-Assisted
Remission, Spontaneous
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology - therapy
Switzerland
Temperance - psychology
Abstract
Although many people recover from substance-use associated problems on their own, little is known about this phenomenon. The paper had two objectives: to use a new research method, computer-assisted content analysis, to understand alcohol and drug abusers' perceived reasons for self-change and to undertake a comparative evaluation across substances and cultures to validate previous findings about subjective appraisal processes. Three studies of natural recoveries of alcohol and drug abusers in two countries conducted tape-recorded interviews with 216 respondents. The taped responses were coded based on a content analytic dictionary approach using a computerized content analysis program. All three studies found several processes mediating the decision to change substance use. The computer content analysis confirmed a cognitive appraisal process regardless of the cultural setting or substance. The findings suggest that several procedures might have benefit in clinical interventions.
PubMed ID
11693952 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Allergic rhinitis--incidence and remission rates].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160808
Source
Pneumologie. 2007 Sep;61(9):558
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007

Arterial structure and function after recovery from the metabolic syndrome: the cardiovascular risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146140
Source
Circulation. 2010 Jan 26;121(3):392-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-2010
Author
Juha Koskinen
Costan G Magnussen
Leena Taittonen
Leena Räsänen
Vera Mikkilä
Tomi Laitinen
Tapani Rönnemaa
Mika Kähönen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FI-20520, Finland. jkkosk@utu.fi
Source
Circulation. 2010 Jan 26;121(3):392-400
Date
Jan-26-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brachial Artery - physiology
Carotid Arteries - physiology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - ultrasonography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - therapy
Regional Blood Flow - physiology
Remission, Spontaneous
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Abstract
The reversibility of ultrasonographic vascular changes associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) recovery is unknown. We examined whether spontaneous recovery from MetS (according to the International Diabetes Federation definition) has a favorable effect on vascular properties and evaluated the associations between lifestyle factors and MetS recovery.
We measured carotid artery intima-media thickness, distensibility, and brachial flow-mediated dilatation by ultrasound in 1673 subjects of the Young Finns Study cohort (age, 31.5+/-5.0 years in 2001) who participated in follow-up studies in 2001 and 2007. At baseline, no differences in intima-media thickness, carotid artery distensibility, or flow-mediated dilatation were observed between the recovery group (baseline-only MetS) and those with incident (only at follow-up) or persistent (both at baseline and follow-up) MetS. After 6 years, the recovery group had smaller intima-media thickness (mean+/-SEM, 0.62+/-0.01 versus 0.68+/-0.01 mm; P=0.0009) and higher carotid artery distensibility (1.98+/-0.07%/mm Hg versus 1.56+/-0.04%/mm Hg; P=0.001) compared with the persistent group and higher flow-mediated dilatation compared with the control group (9.91+/-0.51% versus 8.57+/-0.12%; P=0.03). The recovery group had reduced intima-media thickness progression compared with the persistent group (0.036+/-0.005 versus 0.079+/-0.010 mm; P=0.001) and reduced carotid artery distensibility change compared with the incident group (-0.12+/-0.05%/mm Hg versus -0.38+/-0.10%/mm Hg; P=0.03) over the 6-year follow-up. Differences in carotid artery distensibility levels were attenuated (P=0.11) after the inclusion of weight change in the models. MetS recovery was paralleled with significant reductions in waist circumference that independently correlated with increased physical activity and increased attention paid to health habits during the follow-up.
Recovery from the MetS was associated with positive effects on vascular properties during a 6-year follow-up period of young adults.
PubMed ID
20065161 View in PubMed
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Associations of current and remitted major depressive disorder with brain atrophy: the AGES-Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123910
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Feb;43(2):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
M I Geerlings
S. Sigurdsson
G. Eiriksdottir
M E Garcia
T B Harris
T. Sigurdsson
V. Gudnason
L J Launer
Author Affiliation
University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, The Netherlands. m.geerlings@umcutrecht.nl
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Feb;43(2):317-28
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrophy - epidemiology - pathology
Brain - pathology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Interview, Psychological
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Recurrence
Remission, Spontaneous
Abstract
To examine whether lifetime DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), including age at onset and number of episodes, is associated with brain atrophy in older persons without dementia.
Within the population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, 4354 persons (mean age 76 ? 5 years, 58% women) without dementia had a 1.5-T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Automated brain segmentation total and regional brain volumes were calculated. History of MDD, including age at onset and number of episodes, and MDD in the past 2 weeks was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).
Of the total sample, 4.5% reported a lifetime history of MDD; 1.5% had a current diagnosis of MDD (including 75% with a prior history of depression) and 3.0% had a past but no current diagnosis (remission). After adjusting for multiple covariates, compared to participants never depressed, those with current MDD (irrespective of past) had more global brain atrophy [B = -1.25%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.05 to -0.44], including more gray- and white-matter atrophy in most lobes, and also more atrophy of the hippocampus and thalamus. Participants with current, first-onset MDD also had more brain atrophy (B = -1.62%, 95% CI -3.30 to 0.05) whereas those remitted did not (B = 0.06%, 95% CI -0.54 to 0.66).
In older persons without dementia, current MDD, irrespective of prior history, but not remitted MDD was associated with widespread gray- and white-matter brain atrophy. Prospective studies should examine whether MDD is a consequence of, or contributes to, brain volume loss and development of dementia.
PubMed ID
22647536 View in PubMed
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Asthma during the primary school ages--prevalence, remission and the impact of allergic sensitization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82412
Source
Allergy. 2006 May;61(5):549-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Bäcklund A B
Perzanowski M S
Platts-Mills T.
Sandström T.
Lundbäck B.
Rönmark E.
Author Affiliation
The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 2006 May;61(5):549-55
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Remission, Spontaneous
Respiratory Sounds - immunology
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood is the most important time for asthma development. The aims of this study were to study changes in prevalence of asthma and wheeze, remission of asthma and changes in risk factor pattern from age 7-8 to age 11-12 in a cohort of school children. METHODS: In 1996, 3525 children aged 7-8 years in northern Sweden were invited to participate in a parental expanded ISAAC questionnaire survey. The cohort has been followed prospectively with yearly follow-ups to age 11-12, with a 97% yearly response rate. Skin prick tests were conducted at age 7-8 and 11-12. RESULTS: The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased from 5.7% at age 7-8 to 7.7% at age 11-12. Life-time prevalence of wheeze was 34.7% at age 11-12. The remission of asthma was 10% yearly and inversely related to allergic sensitization. Relapses were common, and remission persisting throughout the observation period was 5% yearly. Allergic sensitization was associated with current asthma at age 7-8 [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.3-7.3)] and when the children were 4 years older [OR 5.6 (3.9-8.2)]. A family history of asthma was associated with current asthma at age 7-8 [OR 3.0 (2.1-4.5)] and 11-12 (OR 2.8 [2.0-3.9]). Ever having lived with a cat was significantly negatively associated with current asthma. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of asthma increased continuously during the primary school ages. Among several significant risk factors, allergic sensitization and a family history of asthma were the most important. With increasing age many known risk factors lost significance. Remission was inversely related to allergic sensitization.
PubMed ID
16629783 View in PubMed
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Asthma in school age: prevalence and risk factors by time and by age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99090
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Oct;2 Suppl 1:123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
A. Bjerg
E. Rönmark
Author Affiliation
The OLIN Studies, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden. anders.bjerg@lung.umu.se
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Oct;2 Suppl 1:123-6
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Family Health
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Remission, Spontaneous
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood is the most important age for asthma development. Recent reports indicate that the prevalence of asthma in children has plateaued after having increased for decades. AIMS: To study prevalence and risk factor patterns of asthma by age and by time. METHODS: In 1996, all children in grade 1-2 (age 7-8) in three cities in Northern Sweden were invited to an expanded International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. A total of 3430 children (97%) participated yearly until 2000 (age 11-12). A subset (n = 2454) was invited to skin-prick testing in 1996 and 2000 with 88% and 90% participation. In 2006, another cohort (n = 2704) was identified and studied by identical methods with 96% participation. A total of 1700 children (90% of invited) were skin-prick tested. RESULTS AND COMMENTS: From age 7-8 to 11-12, the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma increased, 5.7%-7.7% (P
PubMed ID
20298361 View in PubMed
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Atrial and ventricular septal defects - epidemiology and spontaneous closure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82004
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2006 May;19(5):271-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Garne Ester
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Cardiology Unit, Odense University Hospital, DK-5000, Odense C, Denmark. Egarne@health.sdu.dk
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2006 May;19(5):271-6
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Aberrations
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Septal Defects, Atrial - epidemiology - genetics - surgery
Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular - epidemiology - genetics - surgery
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Registries
Remission, Spontaneous
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To present data on the epidemiology and spontaneous closure for septal defects (secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) and/or ventricular septal defect (VSD)). METHODS: Data from the EUROCAT Registry of Congenital Malformations for Funen County, Denmark were analyzed. All infants born from 1986 to 1998, diagnosed with a secundum ASD and/or a VSD as the only cardiac malformation, were included. RESULTS: There were 78 infants with an ASD, 195 with a VSD, and 19 had both an ASD and a VSD. The overall prevalence of septal defects was 4.1 per 1000 livebirths. Among the VSDs 45% were perimembranous and 55% were muscular defects. Associated non-cardiac malformations, syndromes, or karyotype anomalies were present in 54 cases (19% of total) but with a significantly lower proportion among cases with muscular VSDs (7%, p
PubMed ID
16753766 View in PubMed
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163 records – page 1 of 17.