Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Aboriginal nursing education in Canada: an update.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157124
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
David Gregory
Em M Pijl-Zieber
Jeannette Barsky
Melissa Daniels
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Apr;104(4):24-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Career Choice
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Education, Nursing, Graduate - organization & administration
Faculty, Nursing - organization & administration
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Indians, North American - education - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Staff - education - supply & distribution
Personnel Selection
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration
Societies, Nursing - organization & administration
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Canada does not have enough aboriginal nurses and aboriginal nursing faculty. Consequently, there is an inadequate number of nurses to meet both on- and off-reserve and community health care staffing needs. In 2002, Health Canada asked the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing to facilitate a national task force that would examine aboriginal nursing in Canada. The task force engaged in an extensive literature review, conducted a national survey of nursing programs, and explored recruitment and retention strategies. In 2007, the association prepared an update on the current status. In this article, the authors review the progress made during the intervening five years in the recruitment, retention and education of aboriginal nursing students.
PubMed ID
18488764 View in PubMed
Less detail

A responsive evaluation of an Aboriginal nursing education access program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159735
Source
Nurse Educ. 2008 Jan-Feb;33(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Vernon Curran
Shirley Solberg
Sandra LeFort
Lisa Fleet
Ann Hollett
Author Affiliation
Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education, Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Centre, St John's, NL, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
Nurse Educ. 2008 Jan-Feb;33(1):13-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Cultural Diversity
Curriculum
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Problem-Based Learning
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
School Admission Criteria
Social Support
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Training Support - organization & administration
Transcultural Nursing - education
Abstract
Nursing education access programs have been introduced in a number of countries to address the shortage of healthcare providers of Aboriginal descent. An evaluation study of a nursing education access program in Labrador, Canada, was undertaken using a Responsive Evaluation approach. Interviews and focus groups with program stakeholders were conducted. Program effectiveness was influenced by culturally relevant curriculum, experiential and authentic learning opportunities, academic and social support, and the need for partnership building between stakeholders. The authors report key findings resulting from the Responsive Evaluation.
PubMed ID
18091465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Strategies to support recruitment and retention of First Nations youth in baccalaureate nursing programs in Saskatchewan, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157663
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2008 Jul;19(3):274-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
June M Anonson
Joyce Desjarlais
Jackie Nixon
Lori Whiteman
Alteta Bird
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, College of Nursing, Prince Albert, SK, Canada. june.anonson@usask.ca
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2008 Jul;19(3):274-83
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Career Choice
Child
Child care
Communication Barriers
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - organization & administration
Family - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Intergenerational Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Mentors - psychology
Needs Assessment
Organizational Objectives
Remedial Teaching - organization & administration
Saskatchewan
Social Support
Student Dropouts - education - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Students, Nursing - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Training Support - organization & administration
Abstract
Aboriginal youth is one of the fastest growing of all populations in Saskatchewan today. This is a prime group to target for training in the health care professions. The need for strategies to support recruitment and retention in these programs is critical for maintaining our present standard and increasing demands of quality health care. Program initiatives and supports need to be implemented to encourage this population to enroll in and complete health care programs. Although only 5 years old, the University of Saskatchewan, First Nations University of Canada, and Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) have created a viable northern nursing program with a retention rate of Aboriginal postsecondary students 13% greater than the provincial norm. They graduated their first class of nursing students from and for the North, May 2006.
PubMed ID
18421011 View in PubMed
Less detail