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Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal spirituality: symbolic healing in Canadian prisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220386
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
J B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Native Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 1993 Sep;17(3):345-62
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Mental health
Prisoners - psychology
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
Symbolic healing is a complex phenomenon that is still relatively poorly understood. This paper documents a process of symbolic healing which is occurring in Canadian penitentiaries, and which involves Aboriginal offenders in cultural awareness and educational programs. The situation is compounded, however, by the existence of offenders from diverse Aboriginal cultural backgrounds with differing degrees of orientation to Aboriginal and Euro-Canadian cultures. Participants must first receive the necessary education to allow them to identify with the healing symbols so that healing may ensue, and both the healers and the patients must engage in a process of redefining their cultures in search of a common cultural base.
PubMed ID
8269714 View in PubMed
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Abortion in Canada: religious and ideological dimensions of women's attitudes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227544
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Publication Type
Article
Author
V. Krishnan
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Soc Biol. 1991 Fall-Winter;38(3-4):249-57
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Canada
Family Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Marriage
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Religion and Psychology
Abstract
This paper examines a number of demographic and sociocultural factors (e.g., age, marital status, family size, religion, religious assiduity, sex-role ideology) as predictors of women's attitudes toward abortion, using data from the Canadian Fertility Survey of 1984. The findings suggest that women's abortion attitudes are to a greater extent based on ideological positions. It appears that anti-abortion stance affects those women who are religious, presumably by increasing the relationship between their general sex-role ideological stances and abortion attitudes. Abortion attitudes also vary according to a woman's education, her size, and province/region of residence.
PubMed ID
1801205 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
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Are existential questions the norm for terminally ill patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185943
Source
J Palliat Med. 2002 Dec;5(6):815-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002

Assessment of strategies in families tested by Finnish families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196248
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Feb;38(1):17-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
P. Astedt-Kurki
M L Friedemann
E. Paavilainen
T. Tammentie
M. Paunonen-Ilmonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Finland. nupaast@uta.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Feb;38(1):17-24
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Family Health
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Lung Diseases - nursing - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nursing Assessment - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Rheumatic Diseases - nursing - psychology
Systems Analysis
Translating
Abstract
The aim of this paper was to describe testing a Finnish version of the assessment of strategies in families (ASF) instrument and its construct validity and reliability in Finnish families. The ASF instrument is based on Friedemann's framework of systemic organization and the version used in this study consists of 25 items, each containing three statements. The instrument was developed to estimate family functioning in reaching the four targets of the framework of systemic organization. It provides sub-scores for the targets, family stability (system maintenance and coherence), family growth (system change and individuation), control (system maintenance and system change) and spirituality (individuation and coherence). Data were collected from patients attending the outpatient clinics of pulmonary and rheumatic diseases (N=196). Questionnaires were given to patients capable of understanding the questions and they returned questionnaires by mail directly to researchers. Construct validity was tested with exploratory factor analysis. Factor analysis was done with 22 items. The four factor solution was best suited. Two items were eliminated because of low factor loadings and crossloading. The total of 20 items were left in the instrument. Crohnbach's alpha was used to measure internal consistency. It was computed for each target separately and the total tool. There were discrepancies in the assignment of process dimensions which were expected because of cultural perceptions. The total instrument had a reliability of 0.85. The result of the analyses was a pretested tool with subscales for stability, growth, control and spirituality that have acceptable reliability and concept validity. Less satisfactory was the small number of items representing individuation. Another weakness is the lack of statistical distinction between system maintenance and coherence. The instrument is also usable in these subscales, but it needs further development and retesting. Items need to be added to express individuation, possibly some others. The new items will be formulated freely, paying attention to culture. However, the tool appears good enough to be used as measurement in various research studies.
PubMed ID
11137719 View in PubMed
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The association between spiritual and religious involvement and depressive symptoms in a Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177066
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2004 Dec;192(12):818-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Marilyn Baetz
Ronald Griffin
Rudy Bowen
Harold G Koenig
Eugene Marcoux
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2004 Dec;192(12):818-22
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Spirituality
Abstract
Data from a large epidemiologic survey were examined to determine the relationship of religious practice (worship service attendance), spiritual and religious self-perception, and importance (salience) to depressive symptoms. Data were obtained from 70,884 respondents older than 15 years from the Canadian National Population Health Survey (Wave II, 1996-1997). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of the religious/spiritual variables to depressive symptoms while controlling for demographic, social, and health variables. More frequent worship service attendees had significantly fewer depressive symptoms. In contrast, those who stated spiritual values or faith were important or perceived themselves to be spiritual/religious had higher levels of depressive symptoms, even after controlling for potential mediating and confounding factors. It is evident that spirituality/religion has an important effect on depressive symptoms, but this study underscores the complexity of this relationship. Longitudinal studies are needed to help elucidate mechanisms and the order and direction of effects.
PubMed ID
15583502 View in PubMed
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Associations between faith, distress and mental adjustment--a Danish survivorship study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118388
Source
Acta Oncol. 2013 Feb;52(2):364-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Christine Tind Johannessen-Henry
Isabelle Deltour
Pernille Envold Bidstrup
Susanne O Dalton
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Unit of Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. tind@cancer.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2013 Feb;52(2):364-71
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Religion
Religion and Psychology
Spirituality
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Survival Rate
Survivors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several studies have suggested that religion and spirituality are important for overcoming psychological distress and adjusting mentally to cancer, but these studies did not differentiate between spiritual well-being and specific aspects of faith. We examined the extent to which spiritual well-being, the faith dimension of spiritual well-being and aspects of performed faith are associated with distress and mental adjustment among cancer patients.
In a cross-sectional design, 1043 survivors of various cancers filled in a questionnaire on spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp-12), specific aspects of faith ('belief in a god', 'belief in a god with whom I can talk' and 'experiences of god or a higher power'), religious community and church attendance (DUREL), distress (POMS-SF), adjustment to cancer (Mini-MAC) and sociodemographic factors. Linear regression models were used to analyze the associations between exposure (spiritual well-being and specific faith aspects) and outcome (distress and adjustment to cancer) with adjustment for age, gender, cancer diagnosis and physical and social well-being.
Higher spiritual well-being was associated with less total distress (ß = -0.79, CI -0.92; -0.66) and increased adjustment to cancer (fighting spirit, anxious preoccupation, helplessness-hopelessness). Specific aspects of faith were associated with high confusion-bewilderment and tension-anxiety, but also lower score on vigor-activity, and with higher anxious-preoccupation, both higher and lower cognitive avoidance, but also more fighting spirit.
As hypothesized, spiritual well-being were associated with less distress and better mental adjustment. However, specific aspects of faith were both positively and negatively associated with distress and mental adjustment. The results illustrate the complexity of associations between spiritual well-being and specific aspects of faith with psychological function among cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
23215830 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to spiritual care among nursing staff in a Swedish oncology clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168093
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Jul;15(7):863-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Mikael Lundmark
Author Affiliation
Clinic of Oncology, Norrlands universitetssjukhus, Umeå, Sweden. mikael.lundmark@religion.umu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 Jul;15(7):863-74
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Existentialism - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurses' Aides - education - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Oncology Nursing - education - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Self Efficacy
Spirituality
Sweden
Abstract
To identify factors which may influence attitudes to spiritual care, test the relevance of these identified influencing factors in a Swedish nursing context, and replicate a part of a previous study by Strang et al. (Journal of Clinical Nursing 2002;11:48-57) dealing with attitudes to spiritual care in a holistic perspective. A questionnaire was handed out to all nursing staff at a Swedish oncology clinic (n=93) excluding the radiation therapy ward. Data were obtained from 68 nurses or nursing auxiliaries.
(i) Literature review of international research reports concerning spiritual care in a nursing context. (ii) Construction of a questionnaire comprising 17 questions with given alternatives based on the previous literature study. (iii) Operationalization of the concept 'attitudes to spiritual care' into some more easily measurable questions through identification in earlier research reports of conceivable indicators of attitudes to spiritual care. (iv) Construction of a suggestion for a definition of the concept 'spiritual care' from the results of Strang et al. (2002) to be used in the questionnaire. (v) Statistical analysis of the data from the questionnaire and a comparison with previous studies.
The replicating part of the study are mainly in accordance with Strang et al. (2002) and lead to the conclusions that holistic care (i) is desirable, (ii) should include spiritual needs of the patients and (iii) is not yet realized in Swedish health care. The identified influencing factors are relevant in a Swedish nursing context. The factors influencing the largest number of indicators of attitudes to spiritual care are 'non-organized religiousness' and 'degree of comfort while providing spiritual care'. Other influencing factors are: 'belief in God', 'belief in life after death', 'organized religiousness', 'profession', and 'the perceived degree of education in spiritual care'.
Knowledge of attitudes towards spiritual care among nursing staff and factors influencing these attitudes will improve the possibilities of meeting the spiritual needs of patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Nurs. 2006 Jul;15(7):929-30; discussion 931-216879385
PubMed ID
16879379 View in PubMed
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Beacon in the storm: an exploration of the spirituality and faith of parents whose children have cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170259
Source
Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2006 Jan-Mar;29(1):3-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margaret A Schneider
Roger C Mannell
Author Affiliation
Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, Ontario, Canada. mschneider@wlu.ca
Source
Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2006 Jan-Mar;29(1):3-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncology Nursing
Ontario
Parents - psychology
Pediatric Nursing
Problem Solving
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Religion and Psychology
Research Design
Social Support
Spirituality
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to describe the role of spirituality as a coping mechanism in the lives of parents of children with cancer. This exploratory study was conducted using a dominant-less dominant research design with phenomenology as the guiding theoretical orientation. Twelve parents (eight women and four men) were interviewed. Spirituality was described as playing a key role in the coping repertoire of these parents. In particular, spirituality's influence was described in both a religious and secularized manner with both aspects having a positive influence on coping behaviors among these parents. Health care professionals and nurses in particular have a role to play in facilitating access to spiritual resources as well as acknowledging and accepting the spiritual practices of the families they serve.
PubMed ID
16537278 View in PubMed
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121 records – page 1 of 13.