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Community-based disaster management during the 1997 Red River Flood in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201756
Source
Disasters. 1999 Jun;23(2):174-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
J. Buckland
M. Rahman
Author Affiliation
Menno Simons College, University of Winnipeg. jerry.buckland@uwinnipeg.ca
Source
Disasters. 1999 Jun;23(2):174-91
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Networks - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disasters
Health Services Research
Humans
Manitoba
Relief Work - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between community preparedness and response to natural disaster and their level and pattern of community development. This is done by investigating preparation and response to the 1997 Red River Flood by three rural communities in Manitoba, Canada. The communities were selected because of their different ethnic mix and associated level and pattern of community development. The hypothesis was supported that the level and pattern of community development affect community capacity to respond to flooding. Communities characterised by higher levels of physical, human and social capital were better prepared and more effective responders to the flood. However, where the pattern of community development was characterised by high levels of social capital, decision-making processes were complicated.
PubMed ID
10379099 View in PubMed
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The Lost Creek Fire: managing social relations under disaster conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117643
Source
Disasters. 2013 Apr;37(2):317-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Bill Reimer
Judith Kulig
Dana Edge
Nancy Lightfoot
Ivan Townshend
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Bill.Reimer@concordia.ca
Source
Disasters. 2013 Apr;37(2):317-32
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Networks - organization & administration
Fires
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Qualitative Research
Relief Work - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper examines some of the social processes associated with disaster conditions. Utilising an asset-based perspective of community capacity, it focuses on four types of normative systems to interpret the ability of communities to manage disasters through market-, bureaucratic-, associative-, and communal-based norms. Drawing on experience of a wildfire in the Crowsnest Pass region of southwest Alberta, Canada, in 2003, the tensions and compatibilities among these normative systems are evaluated through interviews with 30 community leaders. The results confirm the contributions of all types of social capital to resiliency, the necessity for rapid use of place-based knowledge, and the importance of communication among all types and levels of agents. In addition, they point to the value of identifying and managing potential conflicts among the normative systems as a means to maximising their contributions. The integration of local networks and groups into the more general disaster response minimised the impacts on health and property.
PubMed ID
23278276 View in PubMed
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