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26 records – page 1 of 3.

1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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[Can the international relief work be better?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198406
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 20;120(5):601-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2000
Author
R B Fjaer
Author Affiliation
Kontor for medisinsk beredskap Forsvarets overkommando/Sanitetsstaben Oslo mil/Huseby.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Feb 20;120(5):601-6
Date
Feb-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable disease control
Disaster Planning - organization & administration - standards
Disasters
Disease Outbreaks
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
International Cooperation
Norway
Relief Work - organization & administration - standards
United Nations
War
World Health Organization
PubMed ID
10833922 View in PubMed
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[Catastrophe hygiene, its contents and place in the federal surveillance service system in the protection of consumers' rights and human well-being].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171241
Source
Gig Sanit. 2005 Nov-Dec;(6):34-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Shaposhnikov
T A Lukicheva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2005 Nov-Dec;(6):34-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergencies - epidemiology
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hygiene
Relief Work - organization & administration
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
In the past two decades, there has been an increase in the number of earthquakes, tidal waves, accidents at chemically dangerous enterprises, and other types of catastrophes, which have posed an emergency survival problem for society. The scientific development of this problem has given rise to a new area of preventive medicine--catastrophe hygiene that is designed to eliminate (reduce) the poor influence of emergency factors and to offer the suffered population safe conditions of accommodation and/or life, water supply, nutrition, and other elements of survival under these conditions. The paper defines the subject and objects of studies in catastrophe hygiene. It characterizes the value and role of this science in the organization and implementation of preventive measures to liquidate the medicosanitary consequences of emergencies, as well as the place of hygienic facilities and research institutes within the framework of the Russian emergency service.
PubMed ID
16404881 View in PubMed
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Community-based disaster management during the 1997 Red River Flood in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201756
Source
Disasters. 1999 Jun;23(2):174-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
J. Buckland
M. Rahman
Author Affiliation
Menno Simons College, University of Winnipeg. jerry.buckland@uwinnipeg.ca
Source
Disasters. 1999 Jun;23(2):174-91
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Networks - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disasters
Health Services Research
Humans
Manitoba
Relief Work - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between community preparedness and response to natural disaster and their level and pattern of community development. This is done by investigating preparation and response to the 1997 Red River Flood by three rural communities in Manitoba, Canada. The communities were selected because of their different ethnic mix and associated level and pattern of community development. The hypothesis was supported that the level and pattern of community development affect community capacity to respond to flooding. Communities characterised by higher levels of physical, human and social capital were better prepared and more effective responders to the flood. However, where the pattern of community development was characterised by high levels of social capital, decision-making processes were complicated.
PubMed ID
10379099 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
World Health Forum. 1997;18(3-4):305-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
S. Ekblad
E L Klefbeck
C. Wennström
A L Pietkäinen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Immigrant Environment and Health, National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. Solvig.Ekblad@ipm.ki.se
Source
World Health Forum. 1997;18(3-4):305-10
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Humans
Mental Disorders - prevention & control
Refugees - psychology
Relief Work - organization & administration
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - prevention & control
Sweden
Violence - psychology
War
Abstract
The reception and treatment of refugees traumatized by war and violence are discussed with particular reference to the author's experience of such work in a suburb of Stockholm.
PubMed ID
9478146 View in PubMed
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[Is early debriefing useful or harmful?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175607
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(3):241-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kristian Wahlbeck
Author Affiliation
Vaasan keskussairaala ja Stakes, mielenterveysryhmä, Helsinki. kristian.wahlbeck@stakes.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(3):241-3
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Disasters
Female
Finland
First Aid - psychology
Humans
Male
Relief Work - organization & administration
Risk assessment
Stress, Psychological
Time Factors
Truth Disclosure
PubMed ID
15787281 View in PubMed
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The Lost Creek Fire: managing social relations under disaster conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117643
Source
Disasters. 2013 Apr;37(2):317-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Bill Reimer
Judith Kulig
Dana Edge
Nancy Lightfoot
Ivan Townshend
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Bill.Reimer@concordia.ca
Source
Disasters. 2013 Apr;37(2):317-32
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Networks - organization & administration
Fires
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Qualitative Research
Relief Work - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper examines some of the social processes associated with disaster conditions. Utilising an asset-based perspective of community capacity, it focuses on four types of normative systems to interpret the ability of communities to manage disasters through market-, bureaucratic-, associative-, and communal-based norms. Drawing on experience of a wildfire in the Crowsnest Pass region of southwest Alberta, Canada, in 2003, the tensions and compatibilities among these normative systems are evaluated through interviews with 30 community leaders. The results confirm the contributions of all types of social capital to resiliency, the necessity for rapid use of place-based knowledge, and the importance of communication among all types and levels of agents. In addition, they point to the value of identifying and managing potential conflicts among the normative systems as a means to maximising their contributions. The integration of local networks and groups into the more general disaster response minimised the impacts on health and property.
PubMed ID
23278276 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.