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Cardiovascular risk factor patterns and their association with diet in Saami and Finnish reindeer herders

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102174
Source
Pages 301-304 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Arctic Medical Research rot. 53: Suppl. 2. pp. 301-304, 1994 Cardiovascular Risk Factor Patterns and their Association with Diet in Saami and Finnish Reindeer Herders Simo Nayhli, Kirsti Sikkila and Juhani Hassi Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland, and Department of
  1 document  
Author
Näyhä, S
Sikkilä, K
Hassi, J
Nayha, S
Sikkila, K
Author Affiliation
Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu Finland
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 301-304 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antioxidants
Cardiovascular disease
Diet
Finland
Health
Reindeer herders
Reindeer meat
Risk factors
Saami
Serum cholesterol
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors and their association with diet were examined in Saami (Lapp) and Finnish reindeer herders (total sample size 2705). The Saami men showed lower systolic blood pressure (130 mmHg) than the Finns (137 mmHg), higher serum total cholesterol (6.92 vs. 6.51 mmol/l) and triglycerides (1.32 vs. 1.11 mmol/l), and more Saami than Finnish men were smokers (34% vs. 27%). Subjects eating reindeer meat daily showed serum cholesterol 0.6 mmol/l higher than those who did so once a month or more rarely, the association being independent of age, season, body mass index, or consumption of coffee, milk, bread, fish, or alcohol. The high content of antioxidants of the Saami diet might explain why cardiovascular diseases are relatively uncommon in the Saami area despite the adverse risk factor pattern.
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Climate change effects on snow conditions and the human rights of reindeer herders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297057
Source
Pace Environemental Law Review. Volume 33, issue 1. Fall 2015. Article 1. 22 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Pace Environmental Law Review Volume 33 Issue 1 Fall 2015 Article 1 September 2015 Climate Change Effects on Snow Conditions and the Human Rights of Reindeer Herders Stefan Kirchner University of Lapland, stefan.kirchner@humanrightslawyer.eu Follow this and additional works at: http
  1 document  
Author
Kirchner, Stefan
Author Affiliation
University of Lapland
Source
Pace Environemental Law Review. Volume 33, issue 1. Fall 2015. Article 1. 22 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
307695
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Reindeer herders
Wind energy
Documents

Climate-Change-Effects-on-Snow-Conditions-and-the-Human-Rights-of.pdf

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Fatal accidents and suicide among reindeer-herding Sami in Sweden

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29879
Source
Pages 384-388 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
that the increased socio-ccono1nic pressure and the extensive use of terrain vehicles have increased the risk for fr1tal accidents an1ong Svvedish reindeer herders, and that com1ncrcial reindeer 1na- nagen1cnt is one of the n1ost dangerous occupations in Svveden. Key vrords: Fatal accidents, \Vork
  1 document  
Author
Hassler, S
Sj�¶lander, P
Johansson, R
Gr�¶nberg, H
Damber, L
Author Affiliation
Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden
Source
Pages 384-388 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Deer
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Fatal accidents
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Reindeer herders
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sami
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Work-related deaths
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Over the last decades, reindeer-herding management has experienced dramatic changes, e.g. increased motorization and socio-economic pressure. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these changes have increased the risk of fatal, work-related accidents and suicide between 1961 and 2000. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cohort containing 7,482 members of reindeer-herding Sami families was extracted from national population registers. Information on fatal accidents and suicide was obtained from the Swedish Causes of Death Register, and compared to the expected number of deaths in a demographically matched control population of non-Sami. RESULTS: The male reindeer herding Sami showed a significantly increased risk of dying from accidents such as vehicle accidents and poisoning. No significant increased risk of suicide was observed. A comparison between the periods of 1961-1980 and 1981-2000 showed non-significant differences in risk, although a trend towards increased risks was observed for most types of external causes of death except suicide. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the increased socio-economic pressure and the extensive use of terrain vehicles have increased the risk for fatal accidents among Swedish reindeer herders, and that commercial reindeer management is one of the most dangerous occupations in Sweden.
PubMed ID
15736690 View in PubMed
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The health condition in the Sami population of Sweden, 1961-2002: Causes of death and incidences of cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296241
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2005
of external causes of death, except suicide. It is suggested that the increased socio-economic pressure and the extensive use of terrain vehicles have increased the risk for fatal accidents among Swedish reindeer herders. It is concluded that commercial reindeer management is one of the most
  1 document  
Author
Hassler, Sven
Source
Umeå University Medical Dissertations New Series no 962. Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. 71 p.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
468671
Keywords
Sami
Health
Epidemiology
Reindeer herder
Cardiovascular diseases
Cancer
Causes of death
Acculturation
Sweden
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Psychosocial factors and working conditions related to mental health of reindeer herders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76745
Source
Pages 229-230 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 229-230, 1988 PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS AND WORKING CONDITIONS RELATED TO MENTAL HEALTH OF REINDEER HERDERS K. Makinen and J. Hassi Oulu Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland Abstract. To develop the model of health care for
  1 document  
Author
Mäkinen, K
Makinen, K
Hassi, J.
Author Affiliation
Oulu Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Oulu, Finland
Source
Pages 229-230 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Demographic variables
Mental health care
Mental stress
Negative workload factors
Occupational health care
Occupational hygiene
Pilot survey
Psychological stress symptoms
Psychosocial load factors
Reindeer herders
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Radiation dose to Finnish Lapps--comparison of effects of fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and from the Chernobyl accident.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76734
Source
Pages 186-191 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
. Especially efficiently enriched is 137Cs. The mean body burden of 137Cs in Finnish male reindeer herders reached its max- imum value, 53,000 Bq, in 1965. After that it started to decrease. In April, 1986, it was 5,000 Bq for this group and 3,200 Bq for all Lapps. Internally deposited 137Cs resulted in
  1 document  
Author
Rahola, T
Jaakkola, T
Miettinen, J.K
Tillander, M
Suomela, M
Author Affiliation
Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety
Department of Radiochemistry, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
Source
Pages 186-191 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Body Burden
Chernobyl
Finnish Lapland
Reindeer herders
Documents
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Risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among Swedish Sami--A controlled cohort study

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51898
Source
Pages 292-297 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
n1ortality risk fron1 c:\T) in comparison to Saini n1en (5,7). Smoking and large consumption of alcohol, both \Yell-recognised risk factors behind c:\ll_), \Vere not n1ore com1non an1ong San1i than an1ong non-Saini. This is basically in agreen1ent \Vith earlier studies on Finnish reindeer herders (16
  1 document  
Author
Edin-Liljegren, A
Hassler, S
Sj�¶lander, P
Daerga, L
Author Affiliation
Southern Lapland Research Department, Postgatan 7, SE-912 32 Vilhelmina, Sweden
Source
Pages 292-297 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Behavior
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychosocial factors
Reindeer herder
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sami
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of clinical, psychosocial and behavioural risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among reindeer herding (RS) and non-reindeer herding Sami (NRS). STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study, comparing risk factors behind CVD between Sami and non-Sami, RS and NRS, and Sami men and women. METHODS: A cohort of 611 Swedish Sami (276 men and 335 women) was constructed from national population registers. A twice as large control cohort of non-Sami was created, matched by age, gender and area of residence. Information on risk factors was obtained from a database containing clinical and psychosocial-behavioural data from a regional CVD preventive programme for the period 1990-2001. RESULTS: The Sami and the non-Sami showed similar risk factor patterns. The main differences were related to working conditions and lifestyle factors of the RS. The RS men had lower blood pressure, were more physically active and had higher job demand and decision latitude. The RS women showed more negative scores on the indices of the job strain model. CONCLUSIONS: Previously reported differences in CVD mortality between Sami and non-Sami, and Sami men and women, can only partly be explained by different exposure to the psychosocial and behaviour risk factors investigated in this study.
PubMed ID
15736671 View in PubMed
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Work-related musculoskeletal pain among reindeer herding Sami in Sweden--A pilot study on causes and prevention

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70766
Source
Pages 343-348 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
-third of the reindeer herders reported fevver ..tv.1SP syn1pto1ns as a result of the l.P progran1me. c:onclusions. This pilot study suggests that it is possible to reduce the number and these- verity of the \1SP syn1pton1s ainong reindeer herders by iinplen1enting suitably tailored intervention
  1 document  
Author
Daerga, L
Edin-Liljegren, A
Sj�¶lander, P
Author Affiliation
Southern Lapland Research Department, Vilhelmina, Sweden
Source
Pages 343-348 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Animals
Deer
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Pain - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Pilot Projects
Prevalence
Prevention
Prospective study
Reindeer herders
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sami
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence and to identify causes of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) among reindeer herding Sami, and to evaluate the impact on the MSP symptoms elicited by an intervention-prevention programme (IP programme). STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study in which alterations in MSP symptoms were documented over a two-year period. METHODS: Data were collected from 51 reindeer herders (26 men, 25 women) before and after a two-year IP programme. Information on MSP characteristics (affected body regions, pain duration and pain intensity) and exposure to a number of physical and psychosocial risk factors were collected as part of comprehensive health examinations. Clinical examinations and interviews complemented self-reported data collected through questionnaires. RESULTS: MSP symptoms were prevalent, both among women and men. High exposure to physical risk factors, to a large extent related to extensive use of snowmobiles and motorcycles, was the main cause of MSP among men, while psychosocial risk factors were suggested to be more important among women. About one-third of the reindeer herders reported fewer MSP symptoms as a result of the IP programme. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study suggests that it is possible to reduce the number and the severity of the MSP symptoms among reindeer herders by implementing suitably tailored intervention-prevention measures.
PubMed ID
15736681 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.