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348 records – page 1 of 35.

1 H NMR study and multivariate data analysis of reindeer skin tanning methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291047
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lizheng Zhu
Andrew J Ilott
Eleonora Del Federico
Cindie Kehlet
Torunn Klokkernes
Alexej Jerschow
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Reindeer
Seasons
Skin - chemistry
Tanning - methods
Tannins - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Reindeer skin clothing has been an essential component in the lives of indigenous people of the arctic and sub-arctic regions, keeping them warm during harsh winters. However, the skin processing technology, which often conveys the history and tradition of the indigenous group, has not been well documented. In this study, NMR spectra and relaxation behaviors of reindeer skin samples treated with a variety of vegetable tannin extracts, oils and fatty substances are studied and compared. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), one can recognize patterns and identify groupings of differently treated samples. These methods could be important aids in efforts to conserve museum leather artifacts with unknown treatment methods and in the analysis of reindeer skin tanning processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
27654838 View in PubMed
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137 Cs: seasonal patterns in native residents of three contrasting Alaskan villages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256245
Source
Health Phys. 1971 Jun;20(6):585-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1971

210Pb and 210Po in tissues of some Alaskan residents as related to consumption of caribou or reindeer meat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5061
Source
Health Physics. 1970 Feb;18(2):127-134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1970

Accounting for system dynamics in reserve design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87620
Source
Ecol Appl. 2007 Oct;17(7):1954-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Leroux Shawn J
Schmiegelow Fiona K A
Cumming Steve G
Lessard Robert B
Nagy John
Author Affiliation
Canadian BEACONs project, Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 751 General Services Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H1, Canada. shawn.leroux@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Ecol Appl. 2007 Oct;17(7):1954-66
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Female
Fires
Models, Theoretical
Northwest Territories
Plants
Reindeer
Abstract
Systematic conservation plans have only recently considered the dynamic nature of ecosystems. Methods have been developed to incorporate climate change, population dynamics, and uncertainty in reserve design, but few studies have examined how to account for natural disturbance. Considering natural disturbance in reserve design may be especially important for the world's remaining intact areas, which still experience active natural disturbance regimes. We developed a spatially explicit, dynamic simulation model, CONSERV, which simulates patch dynamics and fire, and used it to evaluate the efficacy of hypothetical reserve networks in northern Canada. We designed six networks based on conventional reserve design methods, with different conservation targets for woodland caribou habitat, high-quality wetlands, vegetation, water bodies, and relative connectedness. We input the six reserve networks into CONSERV and tracked the ability of each to maintain initial conservation targets through time under an active natural disturbance regime. None of the reserve networks maintained all initial targets, and some over-represented certain features, suggesting that both effectiveness and efficiency of reserve design could be improved through use of spatially explicit dynamic simulation during the planning process. Spatial simulation models of landscape dynamics are commonly used in natural resource management, but we provide the first illustration of their potential use for reserve design. Spatial simulation models could be used iteratively to evaluate competing reserve designs and select targets that have a higher likelihood of being maintained through time. Such models could be combined with dynamic planning techniques to develop a general theory for reserve design in an uncertain world.
PubMed ID
17974334 View in PubMed
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Adults only. Reindeer hunting at the middle palaeolithic site salzgitter lebenstedt, northern Germany.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199198
Source
J Hum Evol. 2000 Apr;38(4):497-521
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
S. Gaudzinski
W. Roebroeks
Author Affiliation
Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz, Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit, Schloss Monrepos, Neuwied, 56567, Germany. S.Gaudzinski@rz-online.de
Source
J Hum Evol. 2000 Apr;38(4):497-521
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - anatomy & histology
Feeding Behavior
Germany
Hominidae
Humans
Mammals - anatomy & histology
Paleontology - methods
Reindeer - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The Middle Palaeolithic site Salzgitter Lebenstedt (northern Germany), excavated in 1952, is well known because of its well-preserved faunal remains, dominated by adult reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). The archaeological assemblage accumulated in an arctic setting in an earlier part of the last (Weichsel) glacial (OIS5-3). The site is remarkable because of the presence of unique Middle Palaeolithic bone tools and the occurrence of the northernmost Neanderthal remains, but this paper focuses on an analysis of its reindeer assemblage. The results indicate autumn hunting of reindeer by Middle Palaeolithic hominids. After the hunt, carcasses were butchered and in subsequent marrow processing of the bones a selection against young and sub-adult animals occurred. Adults were clearly preferred, and from their bones, again, poorer marrow bones were neglected. This focus on primeness of resources has been documented in other domains of Neanderthal behaviour, but Salzgitter Lebenstedt is the best example yet known in terms of systematic and routinized processing of game. The Salzgitter Lebenstedt assemblage displays some remarkable similarities to the Late Glacial reindeer assemblages from the Ahrensburg tunnel valley sites. The subsequent review of the evidence on subsistence strategies from earlier periods of the European Palaeolithic shows that hunting of large mammals may have been a part of the behavioural repertoire of the Middle Pleistocene occupants of Europe from the earliest occupation onwards. At the same time, it is suggested that these early hunting strategies were incorporated in ways of moving through landscapes ("settlement systems") which were different from what we know from the middle parts of the Upper Palaeolithic onwards.
Notes
Comment In: J Hum Evol. 2003 Feb;44(2):263-73; author reply 275-8112669705
PubMed ID
10715194 View in PubMed
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Source
Vesterheim. Vol. 8, No. 1 : p. 18-24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
18 Vesterheim At the turn of the twentieth century, a dramatic story unfolded in western Alaska. The heroes of the story were reindeer and reindeer herders. Together they survived storms at sea, starvation on mountain passes, and thousand-mile trips by sled through blizzards. Along the way
  1 document  
Author
Fjeld, Faith
Source
Vesterheim. Vol. 8, No. 1 : p. 18-24.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
4925396
Keywords
Alaska
Reindeer herding
Sami
Yup'ik Inuit
Reindeer Project
Documents

Vesterheim-A-reindeer-story.pdf

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Alcohol consumption among male reindeer herders of Lappish and Finnish origin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223187
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1992 Sep;35(5):735-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
K. Poikolainen
S. Näyhä
J. Hassi
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1992 Sep;35(5):735-8
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - ethnology
Animals
Finland - ethnology
Humans
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations
Questionnaires
Reindeer
Scandinavia - ethnology
Abstract
Ethnic differences in alcohol intake among male reindeer herders were studied, since historical evidence suggests that Lapps drink more than Finns and since the considerable freedom of the herding occupation may imply a high risk for alcohol problems. In 1988, 2001 men answered a mail questionnaire including questions on alcohol intake over the past 12 months. The mean alcohol intake was 22.3 g/day among the Lapps and 13.2g/day among the Finns (P less than 0.001). The percentage of heavy drinkers (20 g or more daily) was 33.9 among the Lapps and 19.1 among the Finns. The mean frequency of getting drunk was 35 occasions/year among both Lapps and Finns. An analysis of variance showed that alcohol intake was significantly related to age, marital status, region and being of Lappish origin, but not to being a full-time reindeer herder. A significant interaction between region and marital status was also detected. The Lappish reindeer herders drink more than their Finnish counterparts. The ethnic difference is not, however, very large when compared with the stereotypic view of the drunken Lapp.
PubMed ID
1439923 View in PubMed
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348 records – page 1 of 35.