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207 records – page 1 of 21.

[A differentiated basic contribution to the list patient system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183963
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-2003

[A differentiated basic contribution to the list patient system?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184955
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 May 15;123(10):1400
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2003
Author
Kjell Maartmann-Moe
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 May 15;123(10):1400
Date
May-15-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Family Practice - economics
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Reimbursement Mechanisms
PubMed ID
12806692 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjusting case mix payment amounts for inaccurately reported comorbidity data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144128
Source
Health Care Manag Sci. 2010 Mar;13(1):65-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Jason M Sutherland
Jeremy Hamm
Jeff Hatcher
Author Affiliation
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth College, 35 Centerra Parkway, Suite 110, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA. Jason.Sutherland@Dartmouth.edu
Source
Health Care Manag Sci. 2010 Mar;13(1):65-73
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification - economics
Humans
Models, Econometric
Monte Carlo Method
Ontario
Reimbursement Mechanisms - economics
Abstract
Case mix methods such as diagnosis related groups have become a basis of payment for inpatient hospitalizations in many countries. Specifying cost weight values for case mix system payment has important consequences; recent evidence suggests case mix cost weight inaccuracies influence the supply of some hospital-based services. To begin to address the question of case mix cost weight accuracy, this paper is motivated by the objective of improving the accuracy of cost weight values due to inaccurate or incomplete comorbidity data. The methods are suitable to case mix methods that incorporate disease severity or comorbidity adjustments. The methods are based on the availability of detailed clinical and cost information linked at the patient level and leverage recent results from clinical data audits. A Bayesian framework is used to synthesize clinical data audit information regarding misclassification probabilities into cost weight value calculations. The models are implemented through Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. An example used to demonstrate the methods finds that inaccurate comorbidity data affects cost weight values by biasing cost weight values (and payments) downward. The implications for hospital payments are discussed and the generalizability of the approach is explored.
PubMed ID
20402283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-specific incidence of new asthma diagnoses in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296726
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb; 5(1):189-191.e3
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Hannu Kankaanranta
Leena E Tuomisto
Pinja Ilmarinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: hannu.kankaanranta@epshp.fi.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb; 5(1):189-191.e3
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - diagnosis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Reimbursement Mechanisms
PubMed ID
27765463 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of alternative funding for physicians practicing gynecologic oncology in Ontario, Canada prior to 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170125
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2006;27(1):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
L. Elit
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2006;27(1):61-4
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Fee-for-Service Plans
Female
Financial Management
Financial Support
Gynecology - economics - standards
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - economics - standards
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - economics - standards
Reimbursement Mechanisms - organization & administration
Risk factors
Abstract
To consider the policy issue of physician reimbursement by examining the events that preceded the Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists moving from a fee-for-service environment to an alternate payment plan in 2001.
The sources of information included a literature search, reviewing Canadian newspapers, interactions with key leaders in the field (Ontario Medication Association, University physicians), and meeting minutes from both university and provincial groups considering alternate payment plans.
The problem for Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists involved the goal of providing excellent clinical care, undergraduate and postgraduate education, research and administration in the midst of problems with recruitment, retention and remuneration. Multiple causes for this problem included limitations in health care spending and a fee for service payment schedule that did not adequately reimburse complex care. This funding problem got on the agenda as a result of a front page article in the national newspaper and letters of concern solicited from local members of the provincial parliament. The policy formulation needed to account for alternate financial options and the roles of institutional structures such as the universities, Cancer Care Ontario and the Ontario University Health Science Centers. The influences on the evolution of the new funding policy included the actors, their interests, their values, research on the topic and institutions.
The tensions between the goal of excellence in care, education, research and administration and difficulties with recruitment, retention and reimbursement, led the Ontario Gynecologic Oncologists to seek an alternate mechanism of reimbursement from the fee-for-service model.
PubMed ID
16550972 View in PubMed
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Are there regional differences in gynecologic cancer outcomes in the context of a single-payer, publicly-funded health care system? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156237
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 May-Jun;99(3):221-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Janice S Kwon
Mark S Carey
E Francis Cook
Feng Qiu
Lawrence F Paszat
Author Affiliation
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC. janice.kwon@vch.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 May-Jun;99(3):221-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Humans
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Public Health
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Uterine Neoplasms - classification - radiotherapy - surgery
Abstract
Canada has a single-payer, publicly-funded health care system that provides comprehensive health care, and therefore significant disparities in health outcomes are not expected in our population. The objective of this study was to determine if differences exist in endometrial cancer outcomes across regions in Ontario.
This was a population-based study of all endometrial (uterine) cancer cases diagnosed from 1996 to 2000 in Ontario and linked to various administrative databases. Univariate analyses examined trends in demographics (age, income, co-morbidities), treatment (surgical staging and adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy), and pathology (grade, histology, stage) across 14 geographic regions defined by local health integration networks (LHINs) in Ontario. Primary outcome was 5-year overall survival among LHINs, which were compared in a multilevel Cox regression model to account for clustering of patient data at the hospital level.
There were 3,875 evaluable cases with complete information on demographics, treatment, pathology, and outcomes. There was significant variation in patient demographics, treatment, and pathology across the 14 LHINs. Low income level and surgery at a low-volume, community hospital without gynecologic oncologists were not associated with a higher risk of death. There was a trend towards clustering of patients within hospitals. After adjustment for covariates, there was no significant difference in survival across LHINs.
In the context of a single-payer, publicly-funded health care system, we did not find significant regional differences in endometrial cancer outcomes.
PubMed ID
18615946 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes of Canadian and U.S. neurologists regarding carotid endarterectomy for asymptomatic stenosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198449
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2000 May;27(2):116-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
S. Chaturvedi
J L Meinke
E. St Pierre
B. Bertasio
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, MI 48201, USA.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2000 May;27(2):116-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Carotid Stenosis - diagnosis - economics - surgery
Cerebral Angiography
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Endarterectomy, Carotid - utilization
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Neurology - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Physician Self-Referral - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - psychology
Professional Practice
Reimbursement Mechanisms
United States
Abstract
The American Heart Association carotid endarterectomy (CE) guidelines endorse CE for asymptomatic carotid stenosis if the procedure can be performed with low morbidity. However, the Canadian Stroke Consortium has published a consensus against CE for asymptomatic stenosis. The views of practicing neurologists in the two countries on this subject are unclear.
A survey was undertaken of 270 neurologists from either Florida or Indiana and 180 neurologists from either Ontario or Quebec.
The survey was returned by 36% of neurologists. Both Florida (65%) and Indiana neurologists (35%) were significantly more likely than Canadian neurologists (11%) to sometimes/often refer patients for surgery(p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Neurol Sci. 2000 May;27(2):95-610830339
PubMed ID
10830343 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to providing adequate rheumatology care: implications from a survey of rheumatologists in ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187904
Source
J Rheumatol. 2002 Nov;29(11):2420-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Deborah Shipton
Elizabeth M Badley
Arthur A Bookman
Gillian A Hawker
Author Affiliation
Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2002 Nov;29(11):2420-5
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antirheumatic Agents - economics - supply & distribution
Arthritis - drug therapy - economics
Drug Costs
Female
Humans
Male
National Health Programs - economics - standards
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Rheumatology - manpower - standards
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To determine what, if any, barriers exist that prevent rheumatologists from providing adequate rheumatology care.
All 158 identified rheumatologists in Ontario were sent a self-administered questionnaire and followed up by telephone.
The response rate was 83%. All but 6 rheumatologists reported at least one barrier to the provision of service. The 3 most commonly reported barriers were the cost of drugs for patients (83%), billing policies and regulations for consultation and followup visits (72%), and long waiting times for patients (61%). Rheumatologists reporting the latter had significantly longer waiting times (12 vs 4 wks) for new non-urgent patients, although there was no difference for new patients with inflammatory arthritis. Nearly three-quarters of respondents had changed the patterns of their practice over the last 3 years, with significant increases in the amount of independent medical services (e.g., third party billing) and pharmaceutical company work. The majority (89%) of responding rheumatologists reported having at least some difficulty in making ends meet from rheumatology practice alone and 28% found it was not possible.
These results indicate that the majority of rheumatologists face significant barriers to providing adequate care. Given the recruitment and service provision concerns in Canada, these barriers to service need to be addressed to ensure adequate provision of care.
Notes
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2003 Aug;30(8):1890; author reply 1890-112913888
Comment In: J Rheumatol. 2002 Nov;29(11):2251-212415575
PubMed ID
12415603 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood pressure kiosks for medication therapy management programs: business opportunity for pharmacists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126650
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2012 Mar-Apr;52(2):188-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherilyn K D Houle
Anderson W Chuck
Ross T Tsuyuki
Author Affiliation
EPICORE Centre, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2012 Mar-Apr;52(2):188-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood Pressure Monitors
Cohort Studies
Community Pharmacy Services - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Drug Monitoring - economics - instrumentation
Health Care Costs
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Ontario
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Abstract
To develop an economic model based on the use of pharmacy-based blood pressure kiosks for case finding of remunerable medication therapy management (MTM) opportunities.
Descriptive, exploratory, nonexperimental study.
Ontario, Canada, between January 2010 and September 2011.
More than 7.5 million blood pressure kiosk readings were taken from 341 pharmacies.
A model was developed to estimate revenues achievable by using blood pressure kiosks for 1 month to identify a cohort of patients with blood pressure of 130/80 mm Hg or more and caring for those patients during 1 year.
Revenue generated from MTM programs.
Pharmacies could generate an average of $12,270 (range $4,523-24,420) annually in revenue from billing for MTM services.
Blood pressure kiosks can be used to identify patients with elevated blood pressure who may benefit from reimbursable pharmacist cognitive services. Revenue can be reinvested to purchase automated dispensing technology or offset pharmacy technician costs to free pharmacists to provide pharmaceutical care. Improved patient outcomes, increased patient loyalty, and improved adherence are additional potential benefits.
PubMed ID
22370382 View in PubMed
Less detail

207 records – page 1 of 21.