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["Being with" the person cared for in a rehabilitation context: a profound, therapeutic and transformative human relationship].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137034
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2010 Dec;(103):46-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Louise O'Reilly
Chantal Cara
Author Affiliation
Ecole des sciences infirmières, Campus de Longueuil, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Rech Soins Infirm. 2010 Dec;(103):46-66
Date
Dec-2010
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Empathy
Female
Holistic Health
Humanism
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - organization & administration - psychology
Philosophy, Nursing
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Rehabilitation Nursing - education - organization & administration
Abstract
Due to the relational nature of nursing, "being with" the person that is being cared for is an essential phenomenon in the nursing profession. Furthermore, this concept lies at the very core of the philosophy of Caring, which is, according to various authors, the essence of nursing. Using Watson's Human Caring philosophy as the disciplinary perspective, this phenomenological study has explored, with nurses working in rehabilitation (n=17), the meaning of the experience of "being with" the person cared for, as well as the nurses' perception of the contribution of this experience in the rehabilitation of the cared-for person. A total of 51 interviews, three for every participant, were analyzed using the Relational Caring Inquiry phenomenological method developed by Cara (1997). Through data analysis five eidos-themes have emerged; the following four related to the significance of "being with" the cared-for person: the importance of humanistic values at the core of care; the involvement of the nurse and the cared-for person; the reciprocal and relational dimensions of care, and the irreplaceable care experience of contextual complexity. The fifth and last eidos-theme--enhancing the body-soul-spirit harmony of the person cared-for and of the nurse--leads participants to perceive the therapeutic contribution of the experience of "being with" the cared-for person during their rehabilitation process. These results have contributed to the emergence of the meaning of the phenomenon studied: "a deep, therapeutic, and transforming human relationship". All the results lead to innovative implications and suggest possible interventions that can serve as guides to renew the clinical practice of nurses in rehabilitation, as well as the education and research in nursing science.
PubMed ID
21322194 View in PubMed
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Innovative approach in rehabilitation nursing: providing primary care to tertiary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196495
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 1999 Nov-Dec;12(4):23-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Lapierre
Author Affiliation
Rehabilitation Centre, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Nurs Leadersh. 1999 Nov-Dec;12(4):23-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Job Description
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration
Ontario
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Rehabilitation Nursing - education - organization & administration
Spinal Cord Injuries - nursing - rehabilitation
Abstract
In 1998 health care legislation in Ontario changed and allowed Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioners the possibility to expand their practice. At a rehabilitation centre, where spinal cord injured patients would seek primary health care services, a new amalgamated role was implemented to meet those needs. This article will described the advanced practice role that was developed, define the scope of practice, and demonstrate an innovative approach to service delivery. The role serves as a concrete link between primary health care services and tertiary care patients needs.
PubMed ID
11094940 View in PubMed
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Registered Nurses' perceptions of geriatric rehabilitation nursing in three Scandinavian countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71029
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2004 Jun;18(2):220-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Pirkko Routasalo
Lis Wagner
Heli Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. pirkko.routasalo@utu.fi
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2004 Jun;18(2):220-8
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Female
Finland
Geriatric Nursing - education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Objectives
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Nursing - education - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study describes Registered Nurses' perceptions of geriatric rehabilitation nursing as well as their experiences of working in the rehabilitation of older patients in Denmark, Finland and Norway. The aim was to gain deeper insights into how Registered Nurses think about geriatric rehabilitation nursing and how their perceptions differ in these countries. The data were collected among 600 Registered Nurses using a structured questionnaire with five background items and 88 geriatric rehabilitation nursing items. The response rate was 65%. Data analysis was with SPSS statistical software. Geriatric rehabilitation nursing was experienced as something that required knowledge and experience, patience and creativity, as well as professional skills. The nurses talked with their patients about their rehabilitation goals, but not all nurses were aware of those goals. Progress in the rehabilitation process was evaluated on a daily basis and results were noted in the patients' records. The nurses motivated patients by giving them positive feedback, by preventing pain, by pausing to share with the patients their joy about progress, and by giving the patients the opportunity to cope with daily activities. The Registered Nurses in Denmark were more team oriented and they set out the goals in the patient's records more often than their colleagues did in Finland and Norway.
PubMed ID
15147486 View in PubMed
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