Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
J Spinal Cord Med. 2012 Sep;35(5):273-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Source
J Spinal Cord Med. 2012 Sep;35(5):273-4
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Ontario
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
PubMed ID
23031164 View in PubMed
Less detail

A-FROM in action at the Aphasia Institute.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130778
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Aura Kagan
Author Affiliation
Education and Applied Research, Aphasia Institute, Toronto, Canada. akagan@aphasia.ca
Source
Semin Speech Lang. 2011 Aug;32(3):216-28
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphasia - psychology - rehabilitation
Awareness
Communication
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Motivation
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Care Planning
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality Indicators, Health Care - trends
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Treatment Outcome
World Health Organization
Abstract
Aphasia centers are in an excellent position to contribute to the broad definition of health by the World Health Organization: the ability to live life to its full potential. An expansion of this definition by the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) forms the basis for a user-friendly and ICF-compatible framework for planning interventions that ensure maximum real-life outcome and impact for people with aphasia and their families. This article describes Living with Aphasia: Framework for Outcome Measurement and its practical application to aphasia centers in the areas of direct service, outcome measurement, and advocacy and awareness. Examples will be drawn from the Aphasia Institute in Toronto. A case will be made for all aphasia centers to use the ICF or an adaptation of it to further the work of this sector and strengthen its credibility.
PubMed ID
21968558 View in PubMed
Less detail

Postoperative Morbidity and Discharge Destinations After Fast-Track Hip and Knee Arthroplasty in Patients Older Than 85 Years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283885
Source
Anesth Analg. 2016 Jun;122(6):1807-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
FT Pitter
CC Jørgensen
M. Lindberg-Larsen
H. Kehlet
Source
Anesth Analg. 2016 Jun;122(6):1807-15
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - mortality
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects - mortality
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - trends
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark
Dependent Ambulation - trends
Elective Surgical Procedures
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Length of Stay - trends
Logistic Models
Male
Mobility Limitation
Odds Ratio
Orthopedic Equipment
Patient Discharge - trends
Patient Readmission - trends
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Prospective Studies
Registries
Rehabilitation Centers - trends
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Elderly patients are at risk of increased length of hospital stay (LOS), postoperative complications, readmission, and discharge to destinations other than home after elective total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Recent studies have found that enhanced recovery protocols or fast-track surgery can be safe for elderly patients undergoing these procedures and may result in reduced LOS. However, detailed studies on preoperative comorbidity and differentiation between medical and surgical postoperative morbidity in elderly patients are scarce. The aim of this study was to provide detailed information on postoperative morbidity resulting in LOS >4 days or readmissions 4 days. Secondary outcomes were 90-day surgically related readmissions, discharge destination, 90-day mortality, and role of disposing factors for LOS >4 days and 90-day readmissions. Data on preoperative characteristics were prospectively gathered using patient-reported questionnaires. Data on all admissions were collected using the Danish National Health Registry, ensuring complete follow-up. Any cases of LOS >4 days or readmissions were investigated through review of discharge forms or medical records. Backward stepwise logistic regression was used for analysis of association between disposing factors and LOS >4 days and 90-day readmission.
Of 13,775 procedures, 549 were performed in 522 patients =85 years. Median age was 87 years (interquartile range, 85-88) and median LOS of 3 days (interquartile range, 2-5). In 27.3% procedures, LOS was >4 days, with 82.7% due to medical causes, most often related to anemia requiring blood transfusion and mobilization issues. Use of walking aids was associated with LOS >4 days (odds ratio [OR], 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-3.15; P = 0.003), whereas preoperative anemia showed borderline significance (OR, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.99-2.32; P = 0.057). Thirty-eight patients (6.9%) were not discharged directly home, of which 68.4% had LOS >4 days. Readmission rates were 14.2% and 17.9% within 30 and 90 days, respectively, and 75.5% of readmissions within 90 days were medical, mainly due to falls and suspected but disproved venous thromboembolic events. Preoperative anemia was associated with increased (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.13-2.91; P = 0.014) and living alone with decreased (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80; P = 0.004) risk of 90-day readmissions. Ninety-day mortality was 2.0%, with 1.0% occurring during primary admission.
Fast-track THA and TKA with an LOS of median 3 days and discharge to home are feasible in most patients =85 years. However, further attention to pre- and postoperative anemia and the pathogenesis of medical complications is needed to improve postoperative outcomes and reduce readmissions.
PubMed ID
27195631 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Status and prospects for development of an orthopedic traumatology service in the RSFSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247898
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1979;(4):3-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979