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Activity focused and goal directed therapy for children with cerebral palsy--do goals make a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150694
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(22):1808-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kristina Löwing
Annmarie Bexelius
Eva Brogren Carlberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman & Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. kristina.lowing@ki.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(22):1808-16
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child, Preschool
Disability Evaluation
Female
Goals
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Motor Skills
Prospective Studies
Rehabilitation - methods
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the effects of goal directed functional therapy (GDT) to activity focused therapy (AT) for preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP) on everyday activities and gross motor function. Another aim was to evaluate goal attainment in the GDT group.
A prospective intervention study comparing two types of intervention carried out in ecological settings. Forty-four children with CP, (25 boys, 19 girls; mean age 4 year 1 month [SD 1 year 5 month]), Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) levels I-IV participated. Twenty-two children were recruited to the GDT group and 22 to the AT group. Outcome measures were the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), and the Gross Motor Function Measure-66. Furthermore, goal attainment scaling (GAS) was used in the GDT group. The assessments were performed before and after an intervention period of 12 weeks.
The children in the GDT group improved more in most aspects of everyday activities measured by the PEDI than the children in the AT group (p
PubMed ID
19479520 View in PubMed
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Acute stroke care during the first phase of COVID-19 pandemic in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310963
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Apr-2021
Author
Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen
Silje Holt Jahr
Kashif Waqar Faiz
Anette Margrethe Storstein
Bendik Slagsvold Winsvold
Else Charlotte Sandset
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2021 Apr; 143(4):349-354
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Communicable Disease Control - methods - trends
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pandemics - prevention & control
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Stroke Rehabilitation - methods - trends
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate how the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic affected the hospital stroke management and research in Norway.
All neurological departments with a Stroke Unit in Norway (n = 17) were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey. The study focused on the first lockdown period, and all questions were thus answered in regard to the period between 12 March and 15 April 2020.
The responder rate was 94% (16/17). Eighty-one % (13/16) reported that the pandemic affected their department, and 63% (10/16) changed their stroke care pathways. The number of new acute admissions in terms of both strokes and stroke mimics decreased at all 16 departments. Fewer patients received thrombolysis and endovascular treatment, and multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation services were less available. The mandatory 3 months of follow-up of stroke patients was postponed at 73% of the hospitals. All departments conducting stroke research reported a stop in ongoing projects.
In Norway, hospital-based stroke care and research were impacted during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, with likely repercussions for patient care and outcomes. In the future, stroke departments will require contingency plans in order to protect the entire stroke treatment chain.
PubMed ID
33421104 View in PubMed
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Source
Vopr Kurortol Fizioter Lech Fiz Kult. 2006 Sep-Oct;(5):50-5
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article

American Indian/Alaska Native alcohol-related incarceration and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77302
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(3):1-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Feldstein Sarah W
Venner Kamilla L
May Philip A
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1161, USA.
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(3):1-22
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - ethnology - rehabilitation
American Native Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Analysis of Variance
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
New Mexico
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Rehabilitation - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Natives have high rates of alcohol-related arrests and are overrepresented in justice systems. To understand the relationship between alcohol dependence, treatment, and alcohol-related incarceration, this study queried American Indian/Alaska Natives currently in remission from alcohol dependence. Participants reported receiving 0 to 43 treatment experiences. Moreover, participants had a significantly greater number of alcohol-related incarcerations than all other treatments combined. These findings underline the importance of making alcohol treatment available within criminal justice settings.
PubMed ID
17602406 View in PubMed
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[A new form of rehabilitation of sick children in preschool institutions and its effectiveness].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227477
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1991;(1):36-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A S Rudnev
S D Aniskovets
T M Dotsenko
V N Shterliaev
L V Buteva
Source
Sov Zdravookhr. 1991;(1):36-7
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child day care centers - organization & administration
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Child, Preschool
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Rehabilitation - methods
Russia
Abstract
A new form of organizing treatment for children attending preschool institutions is proposed which permits to reduce morbidity in nursery groups of preschool institutions, lower the risk of disadaptation, redistribute curative and preventive work in ambulatory setting in favour of the latter and also reduce disease-caused temporary disability associated with caring for a sick child.
PubMed ID
1827534 View in PubMed
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Assessment of rehabilitation needs in colorectal cancer treatment: Results from a mixed audit and qualitative study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280074
Source
Acta Oncol. 2016 Jun;55(6):705-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Liza Wiedenbein
Maria Kristiansen
Lis Adamsen
Dorte Hjort
Carsten Hendriksen
Source
Acta Oncol. 2016 Jun;55(6):705-11
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Colorectal Neoplasms - rehabilitation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Nurses
Oncology Service, Hospital
Rehabilitation - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
Background Systematic assessments of cancer patients' rehabilitation needs are a prerequisite for devising appropriate survivorship programs. Little is known about the fit between needs assessment outlined in national rehabilitation policies and clinical practice. This study aimed to explore clinical practices related to identification and documentation of rehabilitation needs among patients with colorectal cancer at Danish hospitals. Material and methods A retrospective clinical audit was conducted utilizing data from patient files randomly selected at surgical and oncology hospital departments treating colorectal cancer patients. Forty patients were included, 10 from each department. Semi-structured interviews were carried out among clinical nurse specialists. Audit data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, qualitative data using thematic analysis. Results Documentation of physical, psychological and social rehabilitation needs initially and at end of treatment was evident in 10% (n?=?2) of surgical patient trajectories and 35% (n?=?7) of oncology trajectories. Physical rehabilitation needs were documented among 90% (n?=?36) of all patients. Referral to municipal rehabilitation services was documented among 5% (n?=?2) of all patients. Assessments at surgical departments were shaped by the inherent continuous assessment of rehabilitation needs within standardized fast-track colorectal cancer surgery. In contrast, the implementation of locally developed assessment tools inspired by the distress thermometer (DT) in oncology departments was challenged by a lack of competencies and funding, impeding integration of data into patient files. Conclusion Consensus must be reached on how to ensure more systematic, comprehensive assessments of rehabilitation needs throughout clinical cancer care. Fast-track surgery ensures systematic documentation of physical needs, but the lack of inclusion of data collected by the DT in oncological departments questions the efficacy of assessment tools and points to a need for distinguishing between surgical and oncological settings in national rehabilitation policies.
PubMed ID
26808254 View in PubMed
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[A system for restoring the professional health of flight personnel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199294
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2000 Jan;321(1):71-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000

Cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: Results of the randomized CopenHeartRFA trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282780
Source
Am Heart J. 2016 Nov;181:120-129
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Signe S Risom
Ann-Dorthe Zwisler
Trine B Rasmussen
Kirstine Lærum Sibilitz
Trine L S Madsen
Jesper Hastrup Svendsen
Christian Gluud
Jane Lindschou
Per Winkel
Selina Kikkenborg Berg
Source
Am Heart J. 2016 Nov;181:120-129
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - psychology - rehabilitation - surgery
Cardiac Rehabilitation - methods
Catheter Ablation - methods
Denmark
Exercise Test
Exercise Therapy
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Oxygen consumption
Patient Education as Topic
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To assess the effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation compared with usual care on physical activity and mental health for patients treated with catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.
The patients were randomized 1:1 stratified by paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation and sex to cardiac rehabilitation consisting of 12 weeks physical exercise and four psycho-educational consultations plus usual care (cardiac rehabilitation group) versus usual care. The primary outcome was Vo2 peak. The secondary outcome was self-rated mental health measured by the Short Form-36 questionnaire. Exploratory outcomes were collected.
210 patients were included (mean age: 59 years, 74% men), 72% had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation prior to ablation. Compared with usual care, the cardiac rehabilitation group had a beneficial effect on Vo2 peak at four months (24.3mL kg(-1) min(-1) versus 20.7mL kg(-1) min(-1), p of main effect=0.003, p of interaction between time and intervention=0.020). No significant difference between groups on Short Form-36 was found (53.8 versus 51.9 points, P=.20). Two serious adverse events (atrial fibrillation in relation to physical exercise and death unrelated to rehabilitation) occurred in the cardiac rehabilitation group versus one in the usual care group (death unrelated to intervention) (P=.56). In the cardiac rehabilitation group 16 patients versus 7 in the usual care group reported non-serious adverse events (P=.047).
Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation had a positive effect on physical capacity compared with usual care, but not on mental health. Cardiac rehabilitation caused more non-serious adverse events.
PubMed ID
27823683 View in PubMed
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Centralising acute stroke care and moving care to the community in a Danish health region: Challenges in implementing a stroke care reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278187
Source
Health Policy. 2015 Aug;119(8):1005-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Karla Douw
Camilla Palmhøj Nielsen
Camilla Riis Pedersen
Source
Health Policy. 2015 Aug;119(8):1005-10
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centralized Hospital Services - methods - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Denmark
Health Care Reform - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Program Development
Stroke - therapy
Stroke Rehabilitation - methods
Abstract
In May 2012, one of Denmark's five health care regions mandated a reform of stroke care. The purpose of the reform was to save costs, while at the same time improving quality of care. It included (1) centralisation of acute stroke treatment at specialised hospitals, (2) a reduced length of hospital stay, and (3) a shift from inpatient rehabilitation programmes to community-based rehabilitation programmes. Patients would benefit from a more integrated care pathway between hospital and municipality, being supported by early discharge teams at hospitals. A formal policy tool, consisting of a health care agreement between the region and municipalities, was used to implement the changes. The implementation was carried out in a top-down manner by a committee, in which the hospital sector--organised by regions--was better represented than the primary care sector-organised by municipalities. The idea of centralisation of acute care was supported by all stakeholders, but municipalities opposed the hospital-based early discharge teams as they perceived this to be interfering with their core tasks. Municipalities would have liked more influence on the design of the reform. Preliminary data suggest good quality of acute care. Cost savings have been achieved in the region by means of closure of beds and a reduction of hospital length of stay. The realisation of the objective of achieving integrated rehabilitation care between hospitals and municipalities has been less successful. It is likely that greater involvement of municipalities in the design phase and better representation of health care professionals in all phases would have led to more successful implementation of the reform.
PubMed ID
26094752 View in PubMed
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Centralized rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury--a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82838
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Mar;113(3):178-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Engberg A W
Liebach A.
Nordenbo A.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, Brain Injury Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Hvidovre, Denmark. aae@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2006 Mar;113(3):178-84
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Brain Injuries - classification - pathology - rehabilitation
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Rehabilitation - methods - organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients in the prospective study, six died, and 92 (1.27 per 100,000 population per year) survived after a post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) period of at least 28 days. All 19 patients with PTA 7-27 days and 48% of survivors with PTA at least 4 weeks were discharged directly home. The incidence of patients vegetative at 1 month post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge was significantly better for the former group.
PubMed ID
16441248 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.