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Abdominal massage for people with constipation: a cost utility analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142788
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Kristina Lämås
Lars Lindholm
Birgitta Engström
Catrine Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Constipation - economics - physiopathology - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Laxatives - economics - therapeutic use
Male
Massage - economics - nursing
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Self Care - economics
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate change in health-related quality of life for people with constipation receiving abdominal massage and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two alternative scenarios developed from the original trial.
Constipation is a common problem and is associated with decrease in quality of life. Abdominal massage appears to decrease the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, but its impact on health-related quality of life has not been assessed.
A randomized controlled trial including 60 participants was conducted in Sweden between 2005 and 2007. The control group continued using laxatives as before and the intervention group received additional abdominal massage. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D and analyzed with linear regression. Two scenarios were outlined to conduct a cost utility analysis. In the self-massage scenario patients learned to give self-massage, and in the professional massage scenario patients in hospital received abdominal massage from an Enrolled Nurse.
Linear regression analysis showed that health-related quality of life was statistically significantly increased after 8 weeks of abdominal massage. About 40% were estimated to receive good effect. For 'self-massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro75,000 for the first 16 weeks. For every additional week of abdominal massage, the average dropped and eventually approached euro8300. For 'professional massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro60,000 and eventually dropped to euro28,000.
Abdominal massage may be cost-effective in the long-term and it is relevant to consider it when managing constipation. A crucial aspect will be to identify those who will benefit.
PubMed ID
20557387 View in PubMed
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Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
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Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72190
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Lindencrona
A. Ek
Author Affiliation
Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 236, SE-462 23, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75+ years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.
PubMed ID
10760543 View in PubMed
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The ability of Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory to distinguish between fearful and regular Norwegian dental patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205093
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):105-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Kvale
E. Berg
M. Raadal
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):105-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Dental Anxiety - diagnosis
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Manifest Anxiety Scale
Norway
Psychometrics - methods
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the ability of Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) to distinguish between fearful (n = 145) and regularly attending (n = 156) Norwegian dental patients. The reliability of both instruments was high (Cronbach's alpha indices > 0.95). With DAS, 90% of the fearful patients and 85% of the reference patients were correctly assigned to their appropriate group. Thus it may be concluded that, when used on a Norwegian population, DAS is a valid instrument for distinguishing fearful patients from those regularly attending dental treatment. The corresponding figures for STAI-S were 80% for the fearful patients and 79% for the reference patients. Although not developed specifically for this purpose, this instrument may therefore still validly be used to distinguish between the groups. The correlation between the instruments was 0.76, indicating that to some extent they measure the same phenomenon.
PubMed ID
9669462 View in PubMed
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Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125355
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Barfod
Marlene Mauson Pankoke Lauritzen
Jakob Klim Danker
György Sölétormos
Jakob Lundager Forberg
Peter Anthony Berlac
Freddy Lippert
Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm
Kristian Antonsen
Kai Henrik Wiborg Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hillerød Hospital, Denmark. cbar@hih.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Triage - methods - statistics & numerical data
Vital Signs
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT) system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures.
The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT) and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, T(vitals), and presenting complaint, T(complaint). The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, T(final). We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures.
The covariates, T(vitals), T(complaint) and T(final) were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), systolic blood pressure (BP) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5%) and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%). More than half of the patients had a T(complaint) more urgent than T(vitals), the opposite was true in just 6% of the patients.
The HAPT system is valid in terms of predicting in-hospital mortality and ICU admission in the adult acute population. Abnormal vital signs are strongly associated with adverse outcome, while including the presenting complaint in the triage model may result in over-triage.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 1987 Jul;5(4):278-823593492
Cites: Emerg Med Australas. 2005 Jun;17(3):212-715953221
Cites: CJEM. 2008 Mar;10(2):151-7318371253
Cites: Rev Esp Salud Publica. 2008 May-Jun;82(3):251-918711640
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:2922490233
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2010 Feb;27(2):86-9220156855
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Aug;81(8):932-720637974
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):623-818930373
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:4221718476
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Oct 3;173(40):2490-321975184
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2010 Jan;38(1):70-918514465
PubMed ID
22490208 View in PubMed
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ABO Blood Group and Risk of Thromboembolic and Arterial Disease: A Study of 1.5 Million Blood Donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275912
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Senthil K Vasan
Klaus Rostgaard
Ammar Majeed
Henrik Ullum
Kjell-Einar Titlestad
Ole B V Pedersen
Christian Erikstrup
Kaspar Rene Nielsen
Mads Melbye
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Gustaf Edgren
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - analysis - genetics
Adult
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - epidemiology - genetics
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - genetics
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Thrombophilia - genetics
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
ABO blood groups have been shown to be associated with increased risks of venous thromboembolic and arterial disease. However, the reported magnitude of this association is inconsistent and is based on evidence from small-scale studies.
We used the SCANDAT2 (Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions) database of blood donors linked with other nationwide health data registers to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and the incidence of first and recurrent venous thromboembolic and arterial events. Blood donors in Denmark and Sweden between 1987 and 2012 were followed up for diagnosis of thromboembolism and arterial events. Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios as measures of relative risk. A total of 9170 venous and 24 653 arterial events occurred in 1 112 072 individuals during 13.6 million person-years of follow-up. Compared with blood group O, non-O blood groups were associated with higher incidence of both venous and arterial thromboembolic events. The highest rate ratios were observed for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (incidence rate ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-2.79), deep vein thrombosis (incidence rate ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.05), and pulmonary embolism (incidence rate ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.88).
In this healthy population of blood donors, non-O blood groups explain >30% of venous thromboembolic events. Although ABO blood groups may potentially be used with available prediction systems for identifying at-risk individuals, its clinical utility requires further comparison with other risk markers.
PubMed ID
26939588 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal social organization, contemporary experience and American Indian adolescent alcohol use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9665
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Paul Spicer
Douglas K Novins
Christina M Mitchell
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, P.O. Box 6508, Mailstop F800, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. paul.spicer@uchsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
United States - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anthropologists with an interest in American Indian alcohol use have long held that how native people drink has been conditioned by aspects of the social organization of their societies prior to the disruptive influences of European colonialism. Our goal in this article was to explicitly test the importance of these factors in four contemporary American Indian cultural groups. METHOD: Using data on adolescent alcohol use drawn from the first full wave of the longitudinal Voices of Indian Teens Project (N = 1,651, 51% female), we tested whether patterns of quantity-frequency of alcohol use and the negative consequences of alcohol use predicted by social organzational variables were found among contemporary adolescents and, subsequently, whether these differences persisted when other, more proximal, variables were included. RESULTS: Cultural differences appeared to account for a small percentage of the variance in both quantity-frequency of alcohol use and negative consequences in the initial steps of our analyses, but the pattern in these data was not consistent with the predictions of existing theories regarding aboriginal social organization. Moreover, these cultural differences were no longer significant in the final step of our analyses, suggesting that the cultural differences that did exist were better explained by other factors, at least among these adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Although these analyses did not indicate that culture was irrelevant in understanding adolescent alcohol use in American Indian communities, classic formulations of these effects were of limited utility in understanding the experiences of contemporary American Indian adolescents.
Notes
Erratum In: J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jan;65(1):153
PubMed ID
12921186 View in PubMed
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Absence of cardiovascular benefits and sportfish consumption among St. Lawrence River anglers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182864
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Catherine Godin
Bryna Shatenstein
Gilles Paradis
Tom Kosatsky
Author Affiliation
Département de Médecine Sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. catherine.godin@bigfoot.com
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Nov;93(3):241-7
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Fisheries
Fishes
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
The benefits of sportfish consumption and omega-3 fatty acid (omega3-FA) intake for cardiovascular risk factors were evaluated in a sample of 112 male fishers from the St. Lawrence River in the Montreal area during the 1996 winter and fall fishing seasons. A questionnaire on fishing practices and fish consumption was administered, and fasting blood samples were collected for lipid and phospholipid determination. Linear regression analyses, which considered the confounding effect of major risk factors, did not show any significant association between measured omega3-FAs or reported fish intake and blood lipids or blood pressure. This study is limited by its low statistical power due to the small sample size and the possibility that the fish eaten by the participants were low in omega3-FAs or that the participants diets contained foods high in cholesterol-raising fat.
PubMed ID
14615233 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism among hospital nurses: an idiographic-longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230791
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
R D Hackett
P. Bycio
R M Guion
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Attitude of Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
United States
Abstract
For several months, nurses completed ratings of the degree to which certain events relevant to absence were present during each of their scheduled workdays. The event ratings for days when the nurses decided to be absent were then compared with those for days when the nurses attended. As expected, certain events, such as ill health and tiredness, tended to covary and proved to be consistently related to absenteeism across nurses. Also as expected, some events that were not especially relevant for the nurses as a whole, like having a sick family member or friend and concerns about previous poor attendance, nonetheless emerged as being relevant to the absence behavior of certain individuals. Finally, some events were consistently related to the nurses' expressed desire to be absent but not to actual absences. We discuss these differences from two perspectives, one emphasizing the role of attribution bias and the other, a two-stage process in which such bias has no major role.
PubMed ID
10293533 View in PubMed
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Academic success across the transition from primary to secondary schooling among lower-income adolescents: understanding the effects of family resources and gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108330
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Lisa A Serbin
Dale M Stack
Danielle Kingdon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Centre for Research in Human Development, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West PY-170, Montreal, QC, H4B 1R6, Canada. Lisa.Serbin@Concordia.CA
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Educational Measurement
Family
Female
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Psychological
Models, Statistical
Parent-Child Relations
Poverty
Prospective Studies
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Schools
Sex Factors
Abstract
Successful academic performance during adolescence is a key predictor of lifetime achievement, including occupational and social success. The present study investigated the important transition from primary to secondary schooling during early adolescence, when academic performance among youth often declines. The goal of the study was to understand how risk factors, specifically lower family resources and male gender, threaten academic success following this "critical transition" in schooling. The study involved a longitudinal examination of the predictors of academic performance in grades 7-8 among 127 (56 % girls) French-speaking Quebec (Canada) adolescents from lower-income backgrounds. As hypothesized based on transition theory, hierarchical regression analyses showed that supportive parenting and specific academic, social and behavioral competencies (including spelling ability, social skills, and lower levels of attention problems) predicted success across this transition among at-risk youth. Multiple-mediation procedures demonstrated that the set of compensatory factors fully mediated the negative impact of lower family resources on academic success in grades 7-8. Unique mediators (social skills, spelling ability, supportive parenting) also were identified. In addition, the "gender gap" in performance across the transition could be attributed statistically to differences between boys and girls in specific competencies observed prior to the transition, as well as differential parenting (i.e., support from mother) towards girls and boys. The present results contribute to our understanding of the processes by which established risk factors, such as low family income and gender impact development and academic performance during early adolescence. These "transitional" processes and subsequent academic performance may have consequences across adolescence and beyond, with an impact on lifetime patterns of achievement and occupational success.
PubMed ID
23904002 View in PubMed
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4654 records – page 2 of 466.