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457 records – page 1 of 46.

A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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ABO Blood Group and Risk of Thromboembolic and Arterial Disease: A Study of 1.5 Million Blood Donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275912
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Senthil K Vasan
Klaus Rostgaard
Ammar Majeed
Henrik Ullum
Kjell-Einar Titlestad
Ole B V Pedersen
Christian Erikstrup
Kaspar Rene Nielsen
Mads Melbye
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Gustaf Edgren
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - analysis - genetics
Adult
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - epidemiology - genetics
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - genetics
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Thrombophilia - genetics
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
ABO blood groups have been shown to be associated with increased risks of venous thromboembolic and arterial disease. However, the reported magnitude of this association is inconsistent and is based on evidence from small-scale studies.
We used the SCANDAT2 (Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions) database of blood donors linked with other nationwide health data registers to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and the incidence of first and recurrent venous thromboembolic and arterial events. Blood donors in Denmark and Sweden between 1987 and 2012 were followed up for diagnosis of thromboembolism and arterial events. Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios as measures of relative risk. A total of 9170 venous and 24 653 arterial events occurred in 1 112 072 individuals during 13.6 million person-years of follow-up. Compared with blood group O, non-O blood groups were associated with higher incidence of both venous and arterial thromboembolic events. The highest rate ratios were observed for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (incidence rate ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-2.79), deep vein thrombosis (incidence rate ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.05), and pulmonary embolism (incidence rate ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.88).
In this healthy population of blood donors, non-O blood groups explain >30% of venous thromboembolic events. Although ABO blood groups may potentially be used with available prediction systems for identifying at-risk individuals, its clinical utility requires further comparison with other risk markers.
PubMed ID
26939588 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Adjusting outcome measurements for case-mix in a vascular surgical register--is it possible and desirable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48246
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1996 Nov;12(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
J. Elfström
T. Troëng
A. Stubberöd
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1996 Nov;12(4):459-63
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amputation - statistics & numerical data
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - mortality - surgery
Chi-Square Distribution
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Male
Odds Ratio
Registries
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency
Vascular Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Veins - transplantation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We analysed the variation in the outcome of infrainguinal bypass surgery between departments in a register for clinical audit to see if variation in case-mix influenced the results. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a retrospective analysis of 764 infrainguinal bypass operations performed from 1988 to 1990 at six Swedish surgical departments. Results were assessed at 30 days and at 1 year postoperatively. RESULTS: There was a significant variation (p
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1998 Jul;16(1):879715725
PubMed ID
8980438 View in PubMed
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Age, bodyweight, smoking habits and the risk of severe osteoarthritis in the hip and knee in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13723
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):537-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Bengt Järvholm
Stefan Lewold
Henrik Malchau
Eva Vingård
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Seweden. bengt.jarholm@envmed.umu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(6):537-42
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - utilization
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - utilization
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Facility Design and Construction - manpower
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry - classification
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of severe osteoarthritis, with the need for arthroplasty, in the knee and/or hip according to body mass index (BMI) both within a normal range and in persons with high BMI. Furthermore, we wanted to study the significance of smoking. METHODS: This study identifies male construction workers participating in a national health control program (n = 320,192). The incidence rate for joint replacement was found by matching with the Swedish hospital discharge register between 1987 and 1998. BMI and smoking habit was registered at the time of the health examination. RESULTS: In total 1495 cases of osteoarthritis of the hip and 502 cases of osteoarthritis of the knee were identified and included in this analysis. The incidence rate was found to increase linearly to the BMI even within low and 'normal' BMI. The relative risk for osteoarthritis of the hip was more than two times higher in persons with a BMI of 20-24 than in men with a BMI 17-19. There was almost a doubling of the risk of severe knee osteoarthritis with an increase in BMI of 5 kg/m2. Smoker had a lower risk of osteoarthritis than non-smokers and ex-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: BMI is an important predictor of osteoarthritis even within normal BMI. A decreased risk of osteoarthritis of the hip was found in smokers, but the effect was weak compared to that of BMI or age. Contrary to studies of radiographic osteoarthritis our study indicates higher risk of hip than of knee osteoarthritis.
PubMed ID
16121763 View in PubMed
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Age-incidence relationships and time trends in cervical cancer in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19381
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(4):323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K. Hemminki
X. Li
P. Mutanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2001;17(4):323-8
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Age-incidence relationships are informative of carcinogenic mechanisms. These have been previously assessed for cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) but not for adenocarcinoma. The aim was to assess by means of age-, period- and cohort-specific analyses and Poisson regression modelling whether the two types of cervical cancer show an age-incidence maximum at a relatively young age, as shown in cross-sectional analyses. The Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to analyse age-incidence relationships in cervical SCC and adenocarcinoma diagnosed in years 1958-1996, including a total of 15,118 and 1866 cases, respectively. Area of residence and socio-economic status were included in analyses because they were risk factors of cervical cancer. The analysis of cervical SCC confirmed an incidence maximum at ages 35-39 years. The data for adenocarcinoma also suggested a similar early age maximum but the curves differed extensively by birth cohort. The incidence of adenocarcinoma increased substantially at young age groups towards the end of follow-up. Endometrial adenocarcinoma and vaginal and vulvar SCC, which share some risk factors with cervical cancer, did not show an early age incidence maximum. The results also showed that there was a decrease in the incidence of cervical SCC around year 1960, almost 10 years before the organized population screening, probably due to introduced opportunistic pap testing. The benefits of the organized screening were observed as a further decline in the incidence rates. The unique age-incidence relationships in cervical cancer call for biological explanations.
PubMed ID
11767957 View in PubMed
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Age patterns of mortality and cause-of-death structures in Sweden, Japan, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68504
Source
Demography. 1994 Nov;31(4):633-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
C L Himes
Author Affiliation
Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, University Park 16802.
Source
Demography. 1994 Nov;31(4):633-50
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disease - classification
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper uses a new standard model of adult mortality to compare the mortality patterns of Swedes, Japanese, and U.S. whites between 1950 and 1985. It examines changes in the age patterns of mortality and the cause-of-death structures within the populations, and the relationships between those two factors. As Japan has reached a level of mortality similar to that in Sweden, the age patterns of mortality in the two populations have become more similar despite distinct differences in causes of death. The United States has a cause-of-death structure similar to that of Sweden, but the age pattern of mortality is very different. High mortality in the middle age range in the United States results in approximately a one-year loss of life expectancy at age 45 in comparison with Sweden.
PubMed ID
7890097 View in PubMed
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Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
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457 records – page 1 of 46.