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A 2-year follow-up of 120 Swedish female alcoholics treated early in their drinking career: prediction of drinking outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10097
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
B. Haver
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research Section, Stockholm, Sweden. brit.haver@psyk.uib.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - therapy
Biological Markers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: One hundred twenty women alcoholics recruited to a treatment program called EWA (Early Treatment for Women With Alcohol Addiction) were studied. The selected women were not previously treated for alcohol abuse. METHODS: The women were followed up by use of a structured personal interview, biomarkers sensitive for alcohol abuse (i.e., glutamyl transpeptidase), and questionnaires, by using defined criteria for abstinence, social drinking, satisfactory drinking outcome, and unsatisfactory drinking outcome. RESULTS: Drinking outcome was good (i.e., total abstinence, social drinking, or satisfactory drinking outcome) for 67% of the women during the total follow-up time, by use of strict criteria for relapse. The results were corroborated by the biomarkers. Similar results were reported from two previously studied groups of women from the same department. However, the frequency of abstinence was higher and social drinking was significantly lower among this sample of women. Daily drinking, the use of sedatives, and a long duration of pretreatment alcohol abuse predicted an unfavorable outcome. However, a long duration of outpatient treatment predicted a good outcome, whereas treatment dropout was related to an unsatisfactory drinking outcome. A majority of the women (96%) rated the treatment experience and the treatment program favorably. The overall good results might reflect the selection of the subjects studied. CONCLUSIONS: Improving treatment program adherence would probably improve outcome for the women with an unsatisfactory drinking outcome.
PubMed ID
11707633 View in PubMed
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Abdominal massage for people with constipation: a cost utility analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142788
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Kristina Lämås
Lars Lindholm
Birgitta Engström
Catrine Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Constipation - economics - physiopathology - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Laxatives - economics - therapeutic use
Male
Massage - economics - nursing
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Self Care - economics
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate change in health-related quality of life for people with constipation receiving abdominal massage and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two alternative scenarios developed from the original trial.
Constipation is a common problem and is associated with decrease in quality of life. Abdominal massage appears to decrease the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, but its impact on health-related quality of life has not been assessed.
A randomized controlled trial including 60 participants was conducted in Sweden between 2005 and 2007. The control group continued using laxatives as before and the intervention group received additional abdominal massage. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D and analyzed with linear regression. Two scenarios were outlined to conduct a cost utility analysis. In the self-massage scenario patients learned to give self-massage, and in the professional massage scenario patients in hospital received abdominal massage from an Enrolled Nurse.
Linear regression analysis showed that health-related quality of life was statistically significantly increased after 8 weeks of abdominal massage. About 40% were estimated to receive good effect. For 'self-massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro75,000 for the first 16 weeks. For every additional week of abdominal massage, the average dropped and eventually approached euro8300. For 'professional massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro60,000 and eventually dropped to euro28,000.
Abdominal massage may be cost-effective in the long-term and it is relevant to consider it when managing constipation. A crucial aspect will be to identify those who will benefit.
PubMed ID
20557387 View in PubMed
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Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72190
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Lindencrona
A. Ek
Author Affiliation
Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 236, SE-462 23, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75+ years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.
PubMed ID
10760543 View in PubMed
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Acceptance of Tinnitus As an Independent Correlate of Tinnitus Severity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271188
Source
Ear Hear. 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):e176-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hugo Hesser
Ellinor Bånkestad
Gerhard Andersson
Source
Ear Hear. 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):e176-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety - psychology
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Tinnitus - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Tinnitus is the experience of sounds without an identified external source, and for some the experience is associated with significant severity (i.e., perceived negative affect, activity limitation, and participation restriction due to tinnitus). Acceptance of tinnitus has recently been proposed to play an important role in explaining heterogeneity in tinnitus severity. The purpose of the present study was to extend previous investigations of acceptance in relation to tinnitus by examining the unique contribution of acceptance in accounting for tinnitus severity, beyond anxiety and depression symptoms.
In a cross-sectional study, 362 participants with tinnitus attending an ENT clinic in Sweden completed a standard set of psychometrically examined measures of acceptance of tinnitus, tinnitus severity, and anxiety and depression symptoms. Participants also completed a background form on which they provided information about the experience of tinnitus (loudness, localization, sound characteristics), other auditory-related problems (hearing problems and sound sensitivity), and personal characteristics.
Correlational analyses showed that acceptance was strongly and inversely related to tinnitus severity and anxiety and depression symptoms. Multivariate regression analysis, in which relevant patient characteristics were controlled, revealed that acceptance accounted for unique variance beyond anxiety and depression symptoms. Acceptance accounted for more of the variance than anxiety and depression symptoms combined. In addition, mediation analysis revealed that acceptance of tinnitus mediated the direct association between self-rated loudness and tinnitus severity, even after anxiety and depression symptoms were taken into account.
Findings add to the growing body of work, supporting the unique and important role of acceptance in tinnitus severity. The utility of the concept is discussed in relation to the development of new psychological models and interventions for tinnitus severity.
PubMed ID
25665072 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of two dental and one skeletal age estimation method in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35120
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1995 Oct 30;75(2-3):225-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
L. Kullman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Oral Radiology and Forensic Odontology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1995 Oct 30;75(2-3):225-36
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Determination by Skeleton - methods
Age Determination by Teeth - methods
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Molar - radiography
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The paper concerns the accuracy of two dental methods of age estimation based on the radiographic appearance of the root of the lower third molar. The first dental method tested was traditional with a subjective assessment of the root development stage and the second was a new method with a metric measurement of formed root length. Since previous studies have shown a relatively low precision for dentally based age estimation methods during adolescence, an additional independent indicator of chronological age was employed, namely skeletal maturity according to the atlas and method of Greulich and Pyle (Radiographic Atlas of Skeletal Development of the Hand and Wrist Stanford University Press, CA, 1959). The material was Swedish adolescents aged 12-19 years. It was found that all methods gave an overestimation of chronological age, with the highest overestimation, more than 1 year, for the two dental methods. A stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that skeletal age alone explains 48% of the variation in estimated chronological age. It may be concluded that the accuracy of age estimations based on the lower third molars is quite uncertain during adolescence. Up to 18 years, it is preferable to use skeletal age alone as a predictor. Only a small increase in the explanation coefficient of age variation (3-4%) could be seen if digitized or subjectively estimated root lengths were added as predictors to the skeletal estimation.
PubMed ID
8586347 View in PubMed
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Actuarial assessment of sex offender recidivism risk: a cross-validation of the RRASOR and the Static-99 in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192052
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2001 Dec;25(6):629-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
G. Sjöstedt
N. Långström
Author Affiliation
Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. gabrielle.sjostedt@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2001 Dec;25(6):629-45
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Follow-Up Studies
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Offenses
Sweden
Abstract
We cross-validated two actuarial risk assessment tools, the RRASOR (R. K. Hanson, 1997) and the Static-99 (R. K. Hanson & D. Thornton, 1999), in a retrospective follow-up (mean follow-up time = 3.69 years) of all sex offenders released from Swedish prisons during 1993-1997 (N = 1,400, all men, age > or =18 years). File-based data were collected by a researcher blind to the outcome (registered criminal recidivism), and individual risk factors as well as complete instrument characteristics were explored. Both the RRASOR and the Static-99 showed similar and moderate predictive accuracy for sexual reconvictions whereas the Static-99 exhibited a significantly higher accuracy for the prediction of any violent recidivism as compared to the RRASOR. Although particularly the Static-99 proved moderately robust as an actuarial measure of recidivism risk among sexual offenders in Sweden, both procedures may need further evaluation, for example, with sex offender subpopulations differing ethnically or with respect to offense characteristics. The usefulness of actuarial methods for the assessment of sex offender recidivism risk is discussed in the context of current practice.
PubMed ID
11771638 View in PubMed
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Acute health effects common during graffiti removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50823
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S. Langworth
H. Anundi
L. Friis
G. Johanson
M L Lind
E. Söderman
B A Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.langworth@pharmacia.com
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Collection - methods
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Irritants - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify possible health effects caused by different cleaning agents used in graffiti removal. METHODS: In 38 graffiti removers working 8-h shifts in the Stockholm underground system, the exposure to organic solvents was assessed by active air sampling, biological monitoring, and by interviews and a questionnaire. Health effects were registered, by physical examinations, porta7ble spirometers and self-administered questionnaires. The prevalence of symptoms was compared with 49 controls working at the underground depots, and with 177 population controls. RESULTS: The 8-h time-weighted average exposures (TWA) were low, below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents. The short-term exposures occasionally exceeded the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL), especially during work in poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators. The graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of tiredness and upper airway symptoms compared with the depot controls, and significantly more tiredness, headaches and symptoms affecting airways, eyes and skin than the population controls. Among the graffiti removers, some of the symptoms increased during the working day. On a group basis, the lung function registrations showed normal values. However, seven workers displayed a clear reduction of peak expiratory flow (PEF) over the working shift. CONCLUSIONS: Though their average exposure to organic solvents was low, the graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of unspecific symptoms such as fatigue and headache as well as irritative symptoms from the eyes and respiratory tract, compared with the controls. To prevent adverse health effects it is important to inform the workers about the health risks, and to restrict use of the most hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, it is important to develop good working practices and to encourage the use of personal protective equipment.
PubMed ID
11355296 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis--costs for healthcare and loss of production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106661
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec;48(12):1459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Bodil Andersson
Björn Appelgren
Viktor Sjödin
Daniel Ansari
Johan Nilsson
Ulf Persson
Bobby Tingstedt
Roland Andersson
Author Affiliation
Departments of Surgery, Clinical science in Lund, Lund University and Skåne University hospital , Lund , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec;48(12):1459-65
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost of Illness
Efficiency
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Pancreatitis - economics - therapy
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. Severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) can vary from a mild to a fulminant disease with high morbidity and mortality. Cost analysis has, however, hitherto been sparse. The aim of this study was to calculate the cost of acute pancreatitis, both including hospital costs and costs due to loss of production. MATERIAL AND METHODS. All adult patients treated at Skane University Hospital, Lund, during 2009-2010, were included. A severity grading was conducted and cost analysis was performed on an individual basis. RESULTS. Two hundred and fifty-two patients with altogether 307 admissions were identified. Mean age was 60 ± 19 years, and 121 patients (48%) were men. Severe AP (SAP) was diagnosed in 38 patients (12%). Thirteen patients (5%) died. Acute biliary pancreatitis was more costly than alcohol induced AP (p
PubMed ID
24131379 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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521 records – page 1 of 53.