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30-year mortality after venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257922
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2014
Author
Kirstine Kobberøe Søgaard
Morten Schmidt
Lars Pedersen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. kks@clin.au.dk.
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Date
Sep-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on long-term mortality after venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse.
Using Danish medical databases, we conducted a 30-year nationwide population-based cohort study of 128 223 patients with first-time VTE (1980-2011) and a comparison cohort of 640 760 people from the general population (without VTE) randomly matched by sex, year of birth, and calendar period. The mortality risks for patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were markedly higher than for the comparison cohort during the first year, especially within the first 30 days (3.0% and 31% versus 0.4%). Using Cox regression, we assessed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall 30-year MRR was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.53-1.57) for DVT and 2.77 (95% CI, 2.74-2.81) for PE. The 30-day MRR was 5.38 (95% CI, 5.00-5.80) for DVT and 80.87 (95% CI, 76.02-86.02) for PE. Over time, the 30-day MRR was consistently 5- to 6-fold increased for DVT, whereas it improved for PE from 138 (95% CI, 125-153) in 1980 to 1989 to 36.08 (95% CI, 32.65-39.87) in 2000 to 2011. The 1- to 10-year and 11- to 30-year MRRs remained 25% to 40% increased after both DVT and PE but were 3- to 5-fold increased after DVT and 6- to 11-fold increased after PE when VTE was considered the immediate cause of death.
Patients with VTE are at increased risk of dying, especially within the first year after diagnosis, but also during the entire 30 years of follow-up, with VTE as an important cause of death. Although 30-day mortality after DVT remained fairly constant over the last 3 decades, it improved markedly for PE.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49625027484
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49725027486
PubMed ID
24970783 View in PubMed
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Actuarial assessment of sex offender recidivism risk: a cross-validation of the RRASOR and the Static-99 in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192052
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2001 Dec;25(6):629-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
G. Sjöstedt
N. Långström
Author Affiliation
Division of Forensic Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. gabrielle.sjostedt@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Law Hum Behav. 2001 Dec;25(6):629-45
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis - methods
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Follow-Up Studies
Forensic Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Offenses
Sweden
Abstract
We cross-validated two actuarial risk assessment tools, the RRASOR (R. K. Hanson, 1997) and the Static-99 (R. K. Hanson & D. Thornton, 1999), in a retrospective follow-up (mean follow-up time = 3.69 years) of all sex offenders released from Swedish prisons during 1993-1997 (N = 1,400, all men, age > or =18 years). File-based data were collected by a researcher blind to the outcome (registered criminal recidivism), and individual risk factors as well as complete instrument characteristics were explored. Both the RRASOR and the Static-99 showed similar and moderate predictive accuracy for sexual reconvictions whereas the Static-99 exhibited a significantly higher accuracy for the prediction of any violent recidivism as compared to the RRASOR. Although particularly the Static-99 proved moderately robust as an actuarial measure of recidivism risk among sexual offenders in Sweden, both procedures may need further evaluation, for example, with sex offender subpopulations differing ethnically or with respect to offense characteristics. The usefulness of actuarial methods for the assessment of sex offender recidivism risk is discussed in the context of current practice.
PubMed ID
11771638 View in PubMed
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Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
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Adjusting outcome measurements for case-mix in a vascular surgical register--is it possible and desirable?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48246
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1996 Nov;12(4):459-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
J. Elfström
T. Troëng
A. Stubberöd
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1996 Nov;12(4):459-63
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amputation - statistics & numerical data
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - mortality - surgery
Chi-Square Distribution
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Leg - blood supply
Male
Odds Ratio
Registries
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency
Vascular Surgical Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Veins - transplantation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We analysed the variation in the outcome of infrainguinal bypass surgery between departments in a register for clinical audit to see if variation in case-mix influenced the results. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a retrospective analysis of 764 infrainguinal bypass operations performed from 1988 to 1990 at six Swedish surgical departments. Results were assessed at 30 days and at 1 year postoperatively. RESULTS: There was a significant variation (p
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1998 Jul;16(1):879715725
PubMed ID
8980438 View in PubMed
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Adjustment of intensive care unit outcomes for severity of illness and comorbidity scores.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168850
Source
J Crit Care. 2006 Jun;21(2):142-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Monica Norena
Hubert Wong
Willie D Thompson
Sean P Keenan
Peter M Dodek
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, St Paul's Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6Z 1Y6.
Source
J Crit Care. 2006 Jun;21(2):142-50
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Comorbidity
Coronary Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Comparison of outcomes among intensive care units (ICUs) requires adjustment for patient variables. Severity of illness scores are associated with hospital mortality, but administrative databases rarely include the elements of these scores. However, these databases include the elements of comorbidity scores. The purpose of this study was to compare the value of these scores as adjustment variables in statistical models of hospital mortality and hospital and ICU length of stay after adjustment for other covariates.
We used multivariable regression to study 1808 patients admitted to a 13-bed medical-surgical ICU in a 400-bed tertiary hospital between December 1998 and August 2003.
For all patients, after adjusting for age, sex, major clinical category, source of admission, and socioeconomic determinants of health, we found that Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and comorbidity scores were significantly associated with hospital mortality and that comorbidity but not APACHE II was significantly associated with hospital length of stay. Separate analysis of hospital survivors and nonsurvivors showed that both APACHE II and comorbidity scores were significantly associated with hospital length of stay and APACHE II score was associated with ICU length of stay.
The value of APACHE II and comorbidity scores as adjustment variables depends on the outcome and population of interest.
PubMed ID
16769457 View in PubMed
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Airway inflammatory responses following exposure to occupational agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129355
Source
Chest. 2012 Jun;141(6):1522-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Philippe Prince
Catherine Lemière
Marie-Hélène Dufour
Simone Chaboillez
Louis-Philippe Boulet
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche de l’Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Quebec City, Canada.
Source
Chest. 2012 Jun;141(6):1522-7
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Asthma, Occupational - chemically induced - immunology - physiopathology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Eosinophils - immunology
Female
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Male
Molecular Weight
Neutrophils - immunology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Sputum - cytology
Abstract
Airway inflammatory responses to specific inhalation challenges (SICs) with low-molecular-weight (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) agents have not been studied thoroughly. We assessed the changes in airway inflammatory cells following SIC in sensitized workers, and looked at the influence of various factors on the pattern of inflammatory responses to SIC.
Induced sputum analysis was performed in workers sensitized to LMW (n = 41) or HMW agents (n = 41) after a control day and after a positive SIC. Cell counts were compared with lung function and various clinical parameters.
In the LMW group, eosinophils were increased following late asthmatic responses (median [interquartile range], 0.02 [0.04] × 10(6) cells/g vs 0.30 [0.80] × 10(6) cells/g and 1.0% [3.5] vs 8.9% [8.0], P
PubMed ID
22116794 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorders in schizophrenia: a national cohort study of 12,653 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133164
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;72(6):775-9; quiz 878-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Roland M Jones
Paul Lichtenstein
Martin Grann
Niklas Långström
Seena Fazel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. jonesrm6@cf.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;72(6):775-9; quiz 878-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Marital status
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Comorbid alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in schizophrenia are associated with increased morbidity, more inpatient treatment, and violent offending. It is of clinical importance to identify those with schizophrenia who may go on to develop an alcohol use disorder; however, the risk factors are not well understood. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of an AUD in patients after they had been diagnosed with schizophrenia.
We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 12,653 individuals diagnosed with ICD-defined schizophrenia in Sweden in 1973-2004, using data from national registers. We tested the associations between individual factors (marital status, immigrant status, and previous violent offending), sociodemographic factors (income and education), and parental risk factors (AUDs, psychosis, and violent offending) ICD-defined and AUD development using logistic regression modeling.
Over a median follow-up of 17.3 years, 7.6% of patients had at least 1 hospital diagnosis of AUD. After adjustment for gender and age at diagnosis in a multivariate regression model, previous violent offending (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.8-2.5), low education (OR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5), maternal AUD (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.7), and paternal AUD (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.5-2.3) remained independently associated with increased risk of patient AUD.
AUDs are a common sequela of schizophrenia. Risk factors that could be identified at the time of first presentation include low educational attainment, previous violent offending, and parental history of AUDs and may inform clinical treatment and follow-up of those most at risk.
PubMed ID
21733478 View in PubMed
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Ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and risk of malignant lymphoma: a cohort study based on nationwide prospectively recorded data from Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104364
Source
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 May;66(5):1282-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
K. Hellgren
K E Smedby
C. Backlin
C. Sundstrom
N. Feltelius
J K Eriksson
E. Baecklund
J. Askling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 May;66(5):1282-90
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antirheumatic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma - epidemiology
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sulfasalazine - therapeutic use
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Young Adult
Abstract
Data on lymphoma risk in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are scarce. This study was undertaken to assess the risk of lymphoma in AS and PsA overall and in relation to therapies, including tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi), for which lymphoma risks are a concern.
Through the Swedish National Patient Register we assembled nationwide prevalence cohorts of patients with AS (n = 8,707) and patients with PsA (n = 19,283) for whom data were obtained between 2001 and 2010. Each cohort member was matched to 5 population comparator subjects. Linkage with the nationwide Cancer Register identified all lymphomas recorded from 2001 to 2010. Through the Swedish Biologics Register (Anti-Rheumatic Therapy in Sweden [ARTIS]), we identified patients exposed to TNFi in the AS cohort (n = 1,908) and the PsA cohort (n = 2,605) before lymphoma diagnosis. Hazard ratios (HRs) for lymphoma were estimated by Cox regression. Crude incidences of lymphoma in TNFi-exposed and TNFi-naive patients were compared.
For AS patients, the HR of having lymphoma versus the general population was 0.9 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.5-1.6) (14 lymphomas). For PsA patients, the corresponding HR was 1.2 (95% CI 0.9-1.7) (45 lymphomas). For PsA patients treated with methotrexate and/or sulfasalazine, the HR of having lymphoma was 1.7 (95% CI 1.0-3.1). The numbers and incidence of lymphoma were not materially different in TNFi-exposed versus TNFi-naive AS and PsA patients, although the numbers of lymphomas were small.
In contrast to rheumatoid arthritis, the average risks of lymphoma in AS or PsA are not elevated, although increased risks in a subset of PsA patients cannot be excluded. Our findings indicate that TNFi does not affect the risk of lymphoma in AS or in PsA.
PubMed ID
24782185 View in PubMed
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An observational study comparing 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance with fasting plasma glucose in pregnant women: both poorly predictive of birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186618
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2003
Author
Christian Ouzilleau
Marie-Andrée Roy
Louiselle Leblanc
André Carpentier
Pierre Maheux
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Date
Feb-18-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening
Maternal Welfare
Parity
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quebec
ROC Curve
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The definition and treatment of glucose intolerance during pregnancy are matters of intense controversy. Our goal was to examine the value of the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in terms of its ability to predict birth weight percentile in a group of women with singleton pregnancies who received minimal treatment for their glucose intolerance.
We reviewed the results of OGTTs performed between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation in a group of 300 consecutive high-risk women (mean age 29.5 years [95% confidence interval, CI, 28.9-30.1]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.4-1.7]) whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a randomly administered 50-g glucose load was 8.0 mmol/L or above. These data were compared with results for a randomly selected control group of 300 women whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a 50-g glucose load was less than 8.0 mmol/L (mean age 28.0 years [95% CI 27.4-28.6]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.3-1.6]).
For 76 (25.3%) of the 300 high-risk women, the plasma glucose level 2 hours after a 75-g glucose load (confirmatory OGTT) was 7.8 mmol/L or more, but only 6 of these were treated with insulin, which emphasizes the low level of intervention in this group. Thirty (10.0%) of the neonates in this group were large for gestational age (LGA; adjusted weight at or above the 90th percentile). This proportion did not significantly differ from the proportion for the control group (25 or 8.3%). After exclusion of the 6 insulin-treated women, simple correlations between birth weight percentile and fasting or 2-hour plasma glucose levels were very weak (r = 0.23 and 0.16 respectively; p
Notes
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Cites: Diabetes Care. 1996 Jan;19(1):12-68720526
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):421-512591782
Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):429-3112591783
PubMed ID
12591779 View in PubMed
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Association between corticosteroids and infection, sepsis, and infectious death in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML): results from the Canadian infections in AML research group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120927
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Dec;55(12):1608-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
David Dix
Sonia Cellot
Victoria Price
Biljana Gillmeister
Marie-Chantal Ethier
Donna L Johnston
Victor Lewis
Bruno Michon
David Mitchell
Kent Stobart
Rochelle Yanofsky
Carol Portwine
Mariana Silva
Lynette Bowes
Shayna Zelcer
Josée Brossard
Jeffrey Traubici
Upton Allen
Joseph Beyene
Lillian Sung
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Dec;55(12):1608-14
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications - epidemiology
Bacterial Infections - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Graft vs Host Disease - drug therapy - prevention & control
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - epidemiology - microbiology - surgery - therapy
Male
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Infection continues to be a major problem for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Objectives were to identify factors associated with infection, sepsis, and infectious deaths in children with newly diagnosed AML.
We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study that included children = 18 years of age with de novo, non-M3 AML diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2004, treated at 15 Canadian centers. Patients were monitored for infection from initiation of AML treatment until recovery from the last cycle of chemotherapy, conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relapse, persistent disease, or death (whichever occurred first). Consistent trained research associates abstracted all information from each site.
341 patients were included. Median age was 7.1 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2.0-13.5) and 29 (8.5%) had Down syndrome. In sum, 26 (7.6%) experienced death as a first event. There were 1277 courses of chemotherapy administered in which sterile site microbiologically documented infection occurred in 313 courses (24.5%). Sepsis and infectious death occurred in 97 (7.6%) and 16 (1.3%) courses, respectively. The median days of corticosteroid administration was 2 per course (IQR, 0-6). In multiple regression analysis, duration of corticosteroid exposure was significantly associated with more microbiologically documented sterile site infection, bacteremia, fungal infection, and sepsis. The only factor significantly associated with infectious death was days of corticosteroid exposure (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.08; P = .001).
In pediatric AML, infection, sepsis, and infectious death were associated with duration of corticosteroid exposure. Corticosteroids should be avoided when possible for this population.
PubMed ID
22955431 View in PubMed
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326 records – page 1 of 33.