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ABO Blood Group and Risk of Thromboembolic and Arterial Disease: A Study of 1.5 Million Blood Donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275912
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-12-2016
Author
Senthil K Vasan
Klaus Rostgaard
Ammar Majeed
Henrik Ullum
Kjell-Einar Titlestad
Ole B V Pedersen
Christian Erikstrup
Kaspar Rene Nielsen
Mads Melbye
Olof Nyrén
Henrik Hjalgrim
Gustaf Edgren
Source
Circulation. 2016 Apr 12;133(15):1449-57; discussion 1457
Date
Apr-12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - analysis - genetics
Adult
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - epidemiology - genetics
Blood Donors - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - epidemiology - genetics
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - genetics
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Thrombophilia - genetics
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
ABO blood groups have been shown to be associated with increased risks of venous thromboembolic and arterial disease. However, the reported magnitude of this association is inconsistent and is based on evidence from small-scale studies.
We used the SCANDAT2 (Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions) database of blood donors linked with other nationwide health data registers to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and the incidence of first and recurrent venous thromboembolic and arterial events. Blood donors in Denmark and Sweden between 1987 and 2012 were followed up for diagnosis of thromboembolism and arterial events. Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios as measures of relative risk. A total of 9170 venous and 24 653 arterial events occurred in 1 112 072 individuals during 13.6 million person-years of follow-up. Compared with blood group O, non-O blood groups were associated with higher incidence of both venous and arterial thromboembolic events. The highest rate ratios were observed for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (incidence rate ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-2.79), deep vein thrombosis (incidence rate ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.05), and pulmonary embolism (incidence rate ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-1.88).
In this healthy population of blood donors, non-O blood groups explain >30% of venous thromboembolic events. Although ABO blood groups may potentially be used with available prediction systems for identifying at-risk individuals, its clinical utility requires further comparison with other risk markers.
PubMed ID
26939588 View in PubMed
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Alterations of visual evoked potentials in preschool Inuit children exposed to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls from a marine diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82445
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2006 Jul;27(4):567-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Saint-Amour Dave
Roy Marie-Sylvie
Bastien Célyne
Ayotte Pierre
Dewailly Eric
Després Christine
Gingras Suzanne
Muckle Gina
Author Affiliation
Département d'ophtalmologie, CHU Sainte-Justine, 3175, Côte Sainte-Catherine, Montréal, Que., Canada H3T 1C5.
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2006 Jul;27(4):567-78
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Evoked Potentials, Visual - drug effects
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Methylmercury Compounds - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Reaction Time - drug effects - physiology
Regression Analysis
Selenium - pharmacology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of chronic exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury on visual brain processing in Inuit children from Nunavik (Northern Québec, Canada). Concentrations of total mercury in blood and PCB 153 in plasma had been measured at birth and they were again measured at the time of testing in 102 preschool aged children. Relationships between contaminants and pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were assessed by multivariate regression analyses, taking into account several potential confounding variables. The possible protective effects of selenium and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids against methylmercury and PCB toxicity were also investigated. Results indicate that exposure to methylmercury and PCBs resulting from fish and sea mammal consumption were associated with alterations of VEP responses, especially for the latency of the N75 and of the P100 components. In contrast, the concomitant intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with a shorter latency of the P100. However, no significant interactions between nutrients and contaminants were found, contradicting the notion that these nutrients could afford protection against environmental neurotoxicants. Interestingly, significant associations were found with concentrations of neurotoxicants in blood samples collected at the time of testing, i.e. at the preschool age. Our findings suggest that VEP can be used as a valuable tool to assess the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental contaminants in fish-eating populations.
PubMed ID
16620993 View in PubMed
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Amount of antenatal care and infant outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217840
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1994 Jul;56(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
M. Gissler
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 1994 Jul;56(1):9-14
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cesarean Section
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Registries
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
The connection between the amount of antenatal care and pregnancy outcome was studied using the 1987 Finnish Medical Birth Registry. A total of 57,108 women were included in the analysis. The timing of initiation of antenatal care and the relative number of antenatal visits (adjusted by gestation length), were used as measures of amount of antenatal care. Nine outcome variables measuring infant health and interventions were studied. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences in maternal background characteristics. Women beginning antenatal care after the 16th week of gestation had the poorest outcome. Early attending multiparous women had a higher risk of low birthweight, premature infants, caesarean section and instrumental delivery than did those with average timing of their first attendance. For primigravidas, the increased risk was of prematurity only. A U-shaped curve was found for most of the outcome variables in regard to relative number of visits. The women with many visits had the poorest outcome, and also the highest rates of caesarean section and induction of labour. One reason for the unexpectedly high risks for early attenders may be connected with the content of antenatal care. In Finland, it might be possible to reduce the total number of antenatal visits without having any negative effect on infant health.
PubMed ID
7982522 View in PubMed
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Analysis of ectopic pregnancy data using marginal and conditional models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34130
Source
Stat Med. 1997 Nov 15;16(21):2403-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1997
Author
A. Hadgu
G. Koch
L. Westrom
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Source
Stat Med. 1997 Nov 15;16(21):2403-17
Date
Nov-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - complications - diagnosis
Humans
Laparoscopy
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Models, Statistical
Mycoplasma Infections - complications - diagnosis
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - complications - diagnosis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Ectopic - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
This work is motivated by a longitudinal study of women and their ectopic pregnancy outcomes in Lund, Sweden. In this article, we review and apply the Liang-Zeger methodology to the Lund ectopic pregnancy data set. We further analyse the ectopic pregnancy data using conditional modelling approaches suggested by Rosner and Bonney. From the Lund ectopic pregnancy data, we learned that PID is the strongest predictor of subsequent development of ectopic pregnancy and that there is a monotone relationship between PID severity and ectopic pregnancy. We also learned that the presence of mycoplasma from lower or upper genital tract sites at index laparoscopy is also a strong predictor of ectopic pregnancy. Other correlates of ectopic pregnancy include age at pregnancy and history of gynaecologic surgery.
PubMed ID
9364650 View in PubMed
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Analyzing sibship correlations in birth weight using large sibships from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52712
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 1997;14(4):423-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T H Beaty
R. Skjaerven
D R Breazeale
K Y Liang
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 1997;14(4):423-33
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth Certificates
Birth weight
Cluster analysis
Female
Genotype
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Likelihood Functions
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Age
Models, Statistical
Norway
Nuclear Family
Parity
Pregnancy
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway were used to estimate sibship correlations in large sibships (each with > or = 5 infants among singleton live births surviving the first year of life), while adjusting for covariates such as infant gender, gestational age, maternal age, parity, and time since last pregnancy. This sample of 12,356 full sibs in 2,462 sibships born in Norway between 1968 and 1989 was selected to maximize the information on parity, and a robust approach to estimating both regression coefficients and the sibship correlation using generalized estimating equations (GEE) was employed. In concordance with previous studies, these data showed a high overall correlation in birth weight among full sibs (0.48 +/- 0.01), but this sibship correlation was influenced by parity. In particular, the correlation between the firstborn infant and a subsequent infant was slightly lower than between two subsequent sibs (0.44 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.50 +/- 0.01, respectively). The effect of time between pregnancies was statistically significant, but its predicted impact was modest over the period in which most of these large families were completed. While these data cannot discriminate whether factors influencing birth weight are maternal or fetal in nature, this analysis does illustrate how robust statistical models can be used to estimate sibship correlations while adjusting for covariates in family studies.
PubMed ID
9271714 View in PubMed
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An observational study comparing 2-hour 75-g oral glucose tolerance with fasting plasma glucose in pregnant women: both poorly predictive of birth weight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186618
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-2003
Author
Christian Ouzilleau
Marie-Andrée Roy
Louiselle Leblanc
André Carpentier
Pierre Maheux
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC.
Source
CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):403-9
Date
Feb-18-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Infant, Newborn
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Mass Screening
Maternal Welfare
Parity
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quebec
ROC Curve
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
The definition and treatment of glucose intolerance during pregnancy are matters of intense controversy. Our goal was to examine the value of the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in terms of its ability to predict birth weight percentile in a group of women with singleton pregnancies who received minimal treatment for their glucose intolerance.
We reviewed the results of OGTTs performed between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation in a group of 300 consecutive high-risk women (mean age 29.5 years [95% confidence interval, CI, 28.9-30.1]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.4-1.7]) whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a randomly administered 50-g glucose load was 8.0 mmol/L or above. These data were compared with results for a randomly selected control group of 300 women whose plasma glucose level 1 hour after a 50-g glucose load was less than 8.0 mmol/L (mean age 28.0 years [95% CI 27.4-28.6]; parity 1.5 [95% CI 1.3-1.6]).
For 76 (25.3%) of the 300 high-risk women, the plasma glucose level 2 hours after a 75-g glucose load (confirmatory OGTT) was 7.8 mmol/L or more, but only 6 of these were treated with insulin, which emphasizes the low level of intervention in this group. Thirty (10.0%) of the neonates in this group were large for gestational age (LGA; adjusted weight at or above the 90th percentile). This proportion did not significantly differ from the proportion for the control group (25 or 8.3%). After exclusion of the 6 insulin-treated women, simple correlations between birth weight percentile and fasting or 2-hour plasma glucose levels were very weak (r = 0.23 and 0.16 respectively; p
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):429-3112591783
PubMed ID
12591779 View in PubMed
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Anxiety in early pregnancy: prevalence and contributing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105226
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Jun;17(3):221-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
C. Rubertsson
J. Hellström
M. Cross
G. Sydsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Uppsala University, 751 85, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2014 Jun;17(3):221-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Maternal Age
Parturition - psychology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - psychology
Pregnant Women - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Antenatal anxiety symptoms are not only a health problem for the expectant mother. Research has found that maternal anxiety may also have an impact on the developing baby. Therefore, it is important to estimate the prevalence of maternal anxiety and associated factors. The current study aims to estimate the prevalence of anxiety symptoms during the first trimester of pregnancy and to identify associated risk factors. Secondly, to investigate other factors associated with anxiety during early pregnancy including fear of childbirth and a preference for cesarean section. In a population-based community sample of 1,175 pregnant women, 916 women (78%) were investigated in the first trimester (gestation week 8-12). The Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS-A) was used to measure anxiety symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A scores=8 during pregnancy) was 15.6% in early pregnancy. Women under 25 years of age were at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy (OR 2.6, CI 1.7-4.0). Women who reported a language other than Swedish as their native language (OR 4.2, CI 2.7-7.0), reported high school as their highest level of education (OR 1.6, CI 1.1-2.3), were unemployed (OR 3.5, CI 2.1-5.8), used nicotine before pregnancy (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.5), and had a self-reported psychiatric history of either depression (OR 3.8, CI 2.6-5.6) or anxiety (OR 5.2, CI 3.5-7.9) before their current pregnancy were all at an increased risk of anxiety symptoms during early pregnancy. Anxiety symptoms during pregnancy increased the rate of fear of birth (OR 3.0, CI 1.9-4.7) and a preference for cesarean section (OR 1.7, CI 1.0-2.8). Caregivers should pay careful attention to history of mental illness to be able to identify women with symptoms of anxiety during early pregnancy. When presenting with symptoms of anxiety, the women might need counseling and or treatment in order to decrease her anxiety.
PubMed ID
24442712 View in PubMed
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Assessment of postpartum time-dependent disease risk in case-control studies: an application for examining age-specific effect estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22548
Source
Stat Med. 1996 Jul 30;15(14):1545-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-1996
Author
C C Hsieh
S J Lan
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Source
Stat Med. 1996 Jul 30;15(14):1545-56
Date
Jul-30-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Demography
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Among subjects who have experienced a biological event, such as menarche, menopause or a delivery, one cannot distinguish the effects of time since the event from age at the event due to the linear dependency among these time variables and age at study ('current age'). This is a well-known problem that also exists in the determination of the short- and long-term influence of childbirth on subsequent disease risk, since one must take into account in the analysis both current age and age at delivery. We describe an approach to assess in case-control studies the effect of a full-term pregnancy on time-dependent disease risk by including nulliparous women in the analysis and considering current age as a modifier of the effect of age at delivery. One then uses current age-specific odds ratio estimates that compare uniparous to nulliparous women to examine whether the relative rate of disease varies over time after a delivery. Analytic options include stratified analysis and modelling with interaction terms for unconditional or conditional logistic regression analysis. As an example, we have applied this analysis to a large case-control study that utilized record linkage between the Cancer Registry and the Fertility Registry of Sweden and that documented a transient increase in breast cancer risk after a childbirth, followed by a long-term reduction in this risk.
PubMed ID
8855480 View in PubMed
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Association between maternal use of folic acid supplements and risk of autism spectrum disorders in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116379
Source
JAMA. 2013 Feb 13;309(6):570-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-2013
Author
Pål Surén
Christine Roth
Michaeline Bresnahan
Margaretha Haugen
Mady Hornig
Deborah Hirtz
Kari Kveim Lie
W Ian Lipkin
Per Magnus
Ted Reichborn-Kjennerud
Synnve Schjølberg
George Davey Smith
Anne-Siri Øyen
Ezra Susser
Camilla Stoltenberg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. pal.suren@fhi.no
Source
JAMA. 2013 Feb 13;309(6):570-7
Date
Feb-13-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prenatal Care
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Regression Analysis
Risk
Vitamin B Complex - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Prenatal folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in children, but it has not been determined whether they protect against other neurodevelopmental disorders.
To examine the association between maternal use of prenatal folic acid supplements and subsequent risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) (autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified [PDD-NOS]) in children.
The study sample of 85,176 children was derived from the population-based, prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). The children were born in 2002-2008; by the end of follow-up on March 31, 2012, the age range was 3.3 through 10.2 years (mean, 6.4 years). The exposure of primary interest was use of folic acid from 4 weeks before to 8 weeks after the start of pregnancy, defined as the first day of the last menstrual period before conception. Relative risks of ASDs were estimated by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs in a logistic regression analysis. Analyses were adjusted for maternal education level, year of birth, and parity.
Specialist-confirmed diagnosis of ASDs.
At the end of follow-up, 270 children in the study sample had been diagnosed with ASDs: 114 with autistic disorder, 56 with Asperger syndrome, and 100 with PDD-NOS. In children whose mothers took folic acid, 0.10% (64/61,042) had autistic disorder, compared with 0.21% (50/24,134) in those unexposed to folic acid. The adjusted OR for autistic disorder in children of folic acid users was 0.61 (95% CI, 0.41-0.90). No association was found with Asperger syndrome or PDD-NOS, but power was limited. Similar analyses for prenatal fish oil supplements showed no such association with autistic disorder, even though fish oil use was associated with the same maternal characteristics as folic acid use.
Use of prenatal folic acid supplements around the time of conception was associated with a lower risk of autistic disorder in the MoBa cohort. Although these findings cannot establish causality, they do support prenatal folic acid supplementation.
Notes
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Comment In: J Midwifery Womens Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;58(4):471-223837678
PubMed ID
23403681 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between obstetrical interventions and late preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104857
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):538.e1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Kate L Bassil
Abdool S Yasseen
Mark Walker
Michael D Sgro
Prakesh S Shah
Graeme N Smith
Douglas M Campbell
Muhammad Mamdani
Ann E Sprague
Shoo K Lee
Jonathon L Maguire
Author Affiliation
Maternal-Infant Care Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):538.e1-9
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
There is concern that obstetric interventions (prelabor cesarean section and induced delivery) are drivers of late preterm (LP) birth. Our objective was to evaluate the independent association between obstetric interventions and LP birth and explore associated independent maternal and fetal risk factors for LP birth.
In this population-based cross-sectional study, the BORN Information System was used to identify all infants born between 34 and 40 completed weeks of gestation between 2005 and 2012 in Ontario, Canada. The association between obstetric interventions (preterm cesarean section and induced delivery) and LP birth (34 to 36 completed weeks' gestation vs 37 to 40 completed weeks' gestation) was assessed using generalized estimating equation regression.
Of 917,013 births between 34 and 40 weeks, 49,157 were LP (5.4%). In the adjusted analysis, "any obstetric intervention" (risk ratio [RR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.74), induction (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.61-0.82) and prelabor cesarean section (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.59-0.74) were all associated with a lower likelihood of LP vs term birth. Several independent potentially modifiable risk factors for LP birth were identified including previous cesarean section (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.16-1.40), smoking during pregnancy (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.21-1.36) and high material (RR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1.03-1.18) and social (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16) deprivation indices.
After accounting for differences in maternal and fetal risk, LP births had a 35% lower likelihood of obstetric interventions than term births. Obstetric care providers may be preferentially avoiding induction and prelabor cesarean section between 34 and 37 weeks' gestation.
PubMed ID
24582931 View in PubMed
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