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The ability of Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory to distinguish between fearful and regular Norwegian dental patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205093
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):105-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Kvale
E. Berg
M. Raadal
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):105-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Dental Anxiety - diagnosis
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Manifest Anxiety Scale
Norway
Psychometrics - methods
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the ability of Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) to distinguish between fearful (n = 145) and regularly attending (n = 156) Norwegian dental patients. The reliability of both instruments was high (Cronbach's alpha indices > 0.95). With DAS, 90% of the fearful patients and 85% of the reference patients were correctly assigned to their appropriate group. Thus it may be concluded that, when used on a Norwegian population, DAS is a valid instrument for distinguishing fearful patients from those regularly attending dental treatment. The corresponding figures for STAI-S were 80% for the fearful patients and 79% for the reference patients. Although not developed specifically for this purpose, this instrument may therefore still validly be used to distinguish between the groups. The correlation between the instruments was 0.76, indicating that to some extent they measure the same phenomenon.
PubMed ID
9669462 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
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Accessibility and distribution of the Norwegian National Air Emergency Service: 1988-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190330
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Torhild Heggestad
Knut Yngve Børsheim
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Unimed Health Services Research, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):39-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - supply & distribution - utilization
Emergency Medical Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Geography
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Regression Analysis
Safety Management
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
To evaluate the accessibility and distribution of the Norwegian National Air Emergency Service in the 10-year period from 1988 to 1998.
The primary material was annual standardized activity data that included all helicopter missions. A multivariate model of determinants for use of the helicopter service was computed by linear regression. Accessibility was measured as the percentage of the population reached in different flying times, and we evaluated the service using a simulation of alternative locations for the helicopter bases.
The helicopter service (HEMS) has short access times, with a mean reaction time of 8 minutes and a mean response time of 26 minutes for acute missions. Nearly all patients (98%) are reached within 1 hour. A simulation that tested alternative locations of the helicopter bases compared with current locations showed no increase in accessibility. The use of the service shows large regional differences. Multivariate analyses showed that the distances of the patients from the nearest helicopter base and the nearest hospital are significant determinants for the use of HEMS.
Establishment of a national service has given the Norwegian population better access to highly qualified prehospital emergency services. Furthermore, the HEMS has a compensating effect in adjusting for differences in traveling distances to a hospital. Safety, cost-containment, and gatekeeper functions remain challenges.
PubMed ID
11994734 View in PubMed
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Acute phase predictors of subsequent psychosocial burden in carers of elderly stroke patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195006
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2001;11(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
B. Thommessen
T B Wyller
E. Bautz-Holter
K. Laake
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway. bente.thommessen@ioks.uio.no
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2001;11(3):201-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Caregivers - psychology
Cognition
Disabled Persons
Family
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Housekeeping
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Motor Activity
Norway
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Regression Analysis
Social Adjustment
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Stroke - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective was to describe the psychosocial burden experienced by informal carers of elderly stroke victims, and to identify its predictors among baseline characteristics of the patients. From a prospective study of 171 elderly stroke patients admitted to a geriatric ward for rehabilitation in the acute phase, 68 patients living at home with a primary caregiver were identified 6 months after the stroke. At baseline, all the patients were assessed with respect to motor function, cognitive function, global handicap and activities of daily living, and after 6 months the caregivers were assessed, using the Relatives' Stress Scale. According to this, the most frequent impacts were worries that an accident might befall their relatives, that they had to reorganise their household routines and further, that their social life and ability to take holidays had been reduced. Impaired cognitive function was the only baseline patient characteristic that predicted a subsequent psychosocial burden on the carer. Special attention should be paid to elderly stroke patients initially assessed with impaired cognitive function and their caregivers.
PubMed ID
11306768 View in PubMed
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Acute stress reactions after submarine accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74958
Source
Mil Med. 2002 May;167(5):427-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Jarle Eid
Bjørn Helge Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Royal Norwegian Naval Academy, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Mil Med. 2002 May;167(5):427-31
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Analysis of Variance
Humans
Male
Military Personnel - psychology
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to explore contextual and individual factors associated with acute stress reactions in three Norwegian submarine crews exposed to different significant peacetime maneuver accidents. Approximately 2 to 3 weeks after the accidents, crew members completed the Coping Style Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire, the Impact of Event Scale, and the Post-Traumatic Symptom Scale. Although exposed subjects (N = 47) revealed more posttraumatic stress symptoms than nonexposed crew members on shore leave (N = 7), they showed less acute stress reactions than survivors from a surface ship accident in the Norwegian Navy. Inspection of individual cases revealed that 4% of the exposed submariners showed high loads of acute stress symptoms. Unit cohesion and habitual coping styles emerged as resilience factors, whereas previous exposure to critical incidents and personal experience of not coping in the accident situation emerged as vulnerability factors, explaining 32% of the acute stress reactions reported by submarine crew members.
PubMed ID
12053854 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Adult body height of twins compared with that of singletons: a register-based birth cohort study of Norwegian males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115100
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Willy Eriksen
Jon M Sundet
Kristian Tambs
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study, we evaluated whether childhood differences in body height between singletons and twins persist into adulthood. Data from the Medical Birth Register of Norway were linked with data from the Norwegian National Conscript Service. This study used data on the 457,999 males who were born alive and without physical anomalies in single or twin births in Norway during 1967-1984 and who were examined at the mandatory military conscription (age 18-20 years; 1985-2003). For sibling comparisons, the authors selected the 1,721 sibships of full brothers that included at least 1 male born in a single birth and at least 1 male born in a twin birth (4,520 persons, including 2,493 twins and 2,027 singletons). An analysis of the total study population using generalized estimating equations showed that the twins were 0.6 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.4, 0.7) shorter than were the singletons after adjustment for a series of background factors. The fixed-effects regression analysis of the sibships that included both twins and singletons showed that the twins were 0.9 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 1.2) shorter than were their singleton brothers. The study suggests that male twins born in Norway during 1967-1984 were slightly shorter in early adulthood than were singletons.
PubMed ID
23543161 View in PubMed
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Age at first experience of intercourse among Norwegian adolescents: a lifestyle perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12090
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(2):207-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
P. Kraft
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(2):207-13
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Coitus
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Behavior
Social Values
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Age at first intercourse among Norwegian adolescents was studied by means of survival analysis. The data stemmed from a nation-wide survey of 3000 Norwegian adolescents aged 17-19, yielding a response rate of 61.8%. Median age at first intercourse was 17.3 years among girls and 18.0 years among boys. By means of Cox regression analysis associations between age at onset of intercourse and some correlates were estimated. Age at first intercourse was significantly associated with educational aspirations, smoking behaviour, alcohol consumption, peer affiliation, and frequency of visiting a discotheque. These inter-relationships confirm that age at onset of intercourse comprise an important indicator of the lifestyle of an individual. In order to influence sexual behaviour of adolescents it may thus be appropriate to employ health promotion activities focusing upon environmental and structural factors, as a supplement to traditional methods of sex education.
PubMed ID
1887284 View in PubMed
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Age of Entry Into Early Childhood Education and Care as a Predictor of Aggression: Faint and Fading Associations for Young Norwegian Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278580
Source
Psychol Sci. 2015 Oct;26(10):1595-607
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Eric Dearing
Henrik Daae Zachrisson
Ane Nærde
Source
Psychol Sci. 2015 Oct;26(10):1595-607
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Care - organization & administration
Child Day Care Centers
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Socioemotional risks associated with nonparental care have been debated for decades, and research findings continue to be mixed. Yet few studies have been able to test the causal hypothesis that earlier, more extensive, and longer durations of nonmaternal care lead to more problems. To examine the consequences of age of entry into nonparental care for childhood aggression, we used prospective longitudinal data from Norway, where month of birth partly determines age of entry into Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) centers. In this sample of 939 children followed from ages 6 months through 4 years, ECEC teachers reported the children's aggression when they were 2, 3, and 4 years old. We found some evidence that age of entry into ECEC predicted aggression at age 2, albeit modestly and not robustly. Between the ages of 2 and 4 years, the effect of age of entry on aggression faded to negligible levels. The implications for psychological science and policy are discussed.
PubMed ID
26276671 View in PubMed
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304 records – page 1 of 31.