Skip header and navigation

Refine By

387 records – page 1 of 39.

Acceptance of Tinnitus As an Independent Correlate of Tinnitus Severity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271188
Source
Ear Hear. 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):e176-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hugo Hesser
Ellinor Bånkestad
Gerhard Andersson
Source
Ear Hear. 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):e176-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety - psychology
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Tinnitus - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Tinnitus is the experience of sounds without an identified external source, and for some the experience is associated with significant severity (i.e., perceived negative affect, activity limitation, and participation restriction due to tinnitus). Acceptance of tinnitus has recently been proposed to play an important role in explaining heterogeneity in tinnitus severity. The purpose of the present study was to extend previous investigations of acceptance in relation to tinnitus by examining the unique contribution of acceptance in accounting for tinnitus severity, beyond anxiety and depression symptoms.
In a cross-sectional study, 362 participants with tinnitus attending an ENT clinic in Sweden completed a standard set of psychometrically examined measures of acceptance of tinnitus, tinnitus severity, and anxiety and depression symptoms. Participants also completed a background form on which they provided information about the experience of tinnitus (loudness, localization, sound characteristics), other auditory-related problems (hearing problems and sound sensitivity), and personal characteristics.
Correlational analyses showed that acceptance was strongly and inversely related to tinnitus severity and anxiety and depression symptoms. Multivariate regression analysis, in which relevant patient characteristics were controlled, revealed that acceptance accounted for unique variance beyond anxiety and depression symptoms. Acceptance accounted for more of the variance than anxiety and depression symptoms combined. In addition, mediation analysis revealed that acceptance of tinnitus mediated the direct association between self-rated loudness and tinnitus severity, even after anxiety and depression symptoms were taken into account.
Findings add to the growing body of work, supporting the unique and important role of acceptance in tinnitus severity. The utility of the concept is discussed in relation to the development of new psychological models and interventions for tinnitus severity.
PubMed ID
25665072 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accessibility and distribution of the Norwegian National Air Emergency Service: 1988-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190330
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Torhild Heggestad
Knut Yngve Børsheim
Author Affiliation
SINTEF Unimed Health Services Research, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Air Med J. 2002 May-Jun;21(3):39-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - supply & distribution - utilization
Emergency Medical Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Geography
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns
Regression Analysis
Safety Management
Time Factors
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
To evaluate the accessibility and distribution of the Norwegian National Air Emergency Service in the 10-year period from 1988 to 1998.
The primary material was annual standardized activity data that included all helicopter missions. A multivariate model of determinants for use of the helicopter service was computed by linear regression. Accessibility was measured as the percentage of the population reached in different flying times, and we evaluated the service using a simulation of alternative locations for the helicopter bases.
The helicopter service (HEMS) has short access times, with a mean reaction time of 8 minutes and a mean response time of 26 minutes for acute missions. Nearly all patients (98%) are reached within 1 hour. A simulation that tested alternative locations of the helicopter bases compared with current locations showed no increase in accessibility. The use of the service shows large regional differences. Multivariate analyses showed that the distances of the patients from the nearest helicopter base and the nearest hospital are significant determinants for the use of HEMS.
Establishment of a national service has given the Norwegian population better access to highly qualified prehospital emergency services. Furthermore, the HEMS has a compensating effect in adjusting for differences in traveling distances to a hospital. Safety, cost-containment, and gatekeeper functions remain challenges.
PubMed ID
11994734 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activated and total coagulation factor VII, and fibrinogen in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54392
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Danielsen
P T Onundarson
H. Thors
B. Vidarsson
J H Morrissey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspítalinn, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - metabolism
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - metabolism - surgery
Coronary Thrombosis - metabolism
Disease Progression
Factor VII - biosynthesis
Factor VIIa - biosynthesis
Female
Fibrinogen - biosynthesis
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen (FBG) and total coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) concentrations are higher in those patients with coronary artery disease who are at increased future risk of acute ischemic events. The relationship between activated factor VII (FVIIa) and cardiovascular events, however, has not been intensively studied. Data were collected from 401 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Conventional risk factors FVIIc, FVIIa and FBG were assessed in relation to the severity of coronary artery disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, and previous clinical events. A strong positive correlation was found between FVIIa and FVIIc (p
PubMed ID
9636964 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute illnesses in children. A description and analysis of the cumulative incidence proportion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36143
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Sep;11(3):202-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Department of General Practice, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Sep;11(3):202-6
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Models, Statistical
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Conditions
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--To describe parent-reported morbidity in relation to the psycho-social conditions of the families and to characterize families whose children are frequently ill. DESIGN--The parent-reported morbidity in a two-month prospective period, and the psychosocial conditions of the families were registered by means of a questionnaire. The conditioned probability of parents' reporting an episode of illness was estimated by means of logistic regression analysis, taking the psycho-social conditions into consideration. SETTING--18,949 families with at least one child under the age of 8 years, resident in the County of Ringkjøbing in western Denmark at 1 March 1988. SUBJECTS--An age-stratified random sample of 1982 families was entered in the study. 1588 (82%) families returned the questionnaire. RESULTS--The parents reported considerable morbidity in their children. The cumulative incidence proportion (CIP) for the period was 48%. The multivariate analysis of the parent-reported morbidity led to the following main results: 1) the morbidity was greatest for children aged 6 to 18 months, after which it decreased with age, 2) there was interaction between the care conditions and the child's age--CIP for children up to two years was largest for the children who were cared for in daycare, while the CIP for the older children was largest for the children who were cared for at home, 3) if the parents reported that the child's siblings suffered from chronic or frequently recurring morbidity, the child's morbidity rate was significantly increased, 4) mothers with higher education reported more morbidity in their children than mothers without this education, and 5) parents with a high perception of the general health threat ("worried" parents) reported more morbidity than did parents with a low perception. CONCLUSIONS--The results made it possible to characterize families whose children were frequently reported ill.
PubMed ID
8272653 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admission hyperglycemia predicts a worse outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153259
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Apr;32(4):617-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Alexandre Y Poppe
Sumit R Majumdar
Thomas Jeerakathil
William Ghali
Alastair M Buchan
Michael D Hill
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. alexander.poppe@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Apr;32(4):617-22
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Cerebral Hemorrhage - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Admission hyperglycemia has been associated with worse outcomes in ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia (glucose >8.0 mmol/l) in the hyperacute phase would be independently associated with increased mortality, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), and poor functional status at 90 days in stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA).
Using data from the prospective, multicenter Canadian Alteplase for Stroke Effectiveness Study (CASES), the association between admission glucose >8.0 mmol/l and mortality, SICH, and poor functional status at 90 days (modified Rankin Scale >1) was examined. Similar analyses examining glucose as a continuous measure were conducted.
Of 1,098 patients, 296 (27%) had admission hyperglycemia, including 18% of those without diabetes and 70% of those with diabetes. After multivariable logistic regression, admission hyperglycemia was found to be independently associated with increased risk of death (adjusted risk ratio 1.5 [95% CI 1.2-1.9]), SICH (1.69 [0.95-3.00]), and a decreased probability of a favorable outcome at 90 days (0.7 [0.5-0.9]). An incremental risk of death and SICH and unfavorable 90-day outcomes was observed with increasing admission glucose. This observation held true for patients with and without diabetes.
In this cohort of IV-tPA-treated stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia was independently associated with increased risk of death, SICH, and poor functional status at 90 days. Treatment trials continue to be urgently needed to determine whether this is a modifiable risk factor for poor outcome.
Notes
Cites: Diabet Med. 2004 Apr;21(4):305-1015049930
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Aug;35(8):1886-9115192241
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Oct 20;292(15):1839-4415494581
Cites: Stroke. 1993 Jan;24(1):111-68418533
Cites: BMJ. 1997 May 3;314(7090):1303-69158464
Cites: Am J Crit Care. 2007 Jul;16(4):336-46; quiz 34717595363
Cites: Stroke. 2008 Feb;39(2):384-918096840
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Feb 26;117(8):1018-2718268145
Cites: Stroke. 2008 Jun;39(6):1751-818369171
Cites: Stroke. 2008 Oct;39(10):2749-5518703813
Cites: Lancet. 2000 May 13;355(9216):1670-410905241
Cites: Stroke. 2001 Oct;32(10):2426-3211588337
Cites: Neurology. 2001 Nov 13;57(9):1603-1011706099
Cites: Cerebrovasc Dis. 2002;13(2):89-9411867881
Cites: Neurology. 2002 Sep 10;59(5):669-7412221155
Cites: Stroke. 2003 May;34(5):1235-4112677014
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Aug;35(8):1903-715178819
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 1998 Aug;25(3):257-99706731
Cites: Stroke. 1999 Jan;30(1):34-99880385
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 May 10;172(10):1307-1215883405
Cites: Stroke. 2007 Jan;38(1):75-917122437
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2007 May;6(5):397-40617434094
Cites: Brain. 2007 Jun;130(Pt 6):1626-3017525141
Cites: Circulation. 2007 May 22;115(20):e478-53417515473
PubMed ID
19131465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescents alcohol-use and economic conditions: a multilevel analysis of data from a period with big economic changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146664
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;11(6):533-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mikael Svensson
Curt Hagquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. mikael.svensson@oru.se
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;11(6):533-41
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Alcoholism - economics - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - economics
Sweden
Time Factors
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper examines how the unemployment rate is related to adolescent alcohol use and experience of binge drinking during a time period characterized by big societal changes. The paper uses repeated cross-sectional adolescent survey data from a Swedish region, collected in 1988, 1991, 1995, 1998, 2002 and 2005, and merges this with data on local unemployment rates for the same time periods. Individual level frequency of alcohol use as well as experience of binge drinking is connected to local level unemployment rate to estimate the relationship using multilevel modeling. The model includes municipality effects controlling for time-invariant differences between municipalities as well as year fixed effects controlling for municipality-invariant changes over time in alcohol use. The results show that the unemployment rate is negatively associated with adolescents' alcohol use and the experience of binge drinking. When the unemployment rate increases, more adolescents do not drink at all. Regular drinking (twice per month or more) is, on the other hand, unrelated to the unemployment rate. Examining gender-differences in the relationship, it is shown that the results are driven by behavior in girls, whereas drinking among boys does not show any significant relationship with changes in the unemployment rate.
PubMed ID
20012126 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related accident risks: longitudinal study of Swedish iron ore miners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210969
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
L. Laflamme
V L Blank
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):479-87
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Back Injuries
Bone and Bones - injuries
Contusions - epidemiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Efficiency
Facial Injuries - epidemiology
Hand Injuries - epidemiology
Humans
Iron
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mining - classification - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
The study investigated whether occupational accident risks were equally distributed across age categories over time in the context of production reorganization and work rationalization in a Swedish iron ore mine between 1980 and 1993. Three phases of reorganization, defined by productivity levels, and four age categories were related to age-related accident risk ratios using the Poisson-regression method. Accident risk ratios (ARRs) were found systematically to be higher during the two first phases and also for younger workers, in the cases of both nonspecific and specific accident risks. The steady reduction in accident rates observed did not favor all age groups of workers to the same extent. For two accident patterns out of five, workers in their thirties and forties recorded higher ARRs than those in their fifties.
PubMed ID
8892554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and breast cancer in women: a pooled analysis of cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10930
Source
JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):535-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-18-1998
Author
S A Smith-Warner
D. Spiegelman
S S Yaun
P A van den Brandt
A R Folsom
R A Goldbohm
S. Graham
L. Holmberg
G R Howe
J R Marshall
A B Miller
J D Potter
F E Speizer
W C Willett
A. Wolk
D J Hunter
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass 02115, USA.
Source
JAMA. 1998 Feb 18;279(7):535-40
Date
Feb-18-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Linear Models
Menarche
Menopause
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of invasive breast cancer associated with total and beverage-specific alcohol consumption and to evaluate whether dietary and nondietary factors modify the association. DATA SOURCES: We included in these analyses 6 prospective studies that had at least 200 incident breast cancer cases, assessed long-term intake of food and nutrients, and used a validated diet assessment instrument. The studies were conducted in Canada, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United States. Alcohol intake was estimated by food frequency questionnaires in each study. The studies included a total of 322647 women evaluated for up to 11 years, including 4335 participants with a diagnosis of incident invasive breast cancer. DATA EXTRACTION: Pooled analysis of primary data using analyses consistent with each study's original design and the random-effects model for the overall pooled analyses. DATA SYNTHESIS: For alcohol intakes less than 60 g/d (reported by >99% of participants), risk increased linearly with increasing intake; the pooled multivariate relative risk for an increment of 10 g/d of alcohol (about 0.75-1 drink) was 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.13; P for heterogeneity among studies, .71). The multivariate-adjusted relative risk for total alcohol intakes of 30 to less than 60 g/d (about 2-5 drinks) vs nondrinkers was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.18-1.69). Limited data suggested that alcohol intakes of at least 60 g/d were not associated with further increased risk. The specific type of alcoholic beverage did not strongly influence risk estimates. The association between alcohol intake and breast cancer was not modified by other factors. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption is associated with a linear increase in breast cancer incidence in women over the range of consumption reported by most women. Among women who consume alcohol regularly, reducing alcohol consumption is a potential means to reduce breast cancer risk.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1998 Oct 7;280(13):1138-99777807
PubMed ID
9480365 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyses of the caries decline and incidence among Norwegian adolescents 1985-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31306
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Oct;60(5):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Jan Magne Birkeland
Ola Haugejorden
Frithjof Ramm von der Fehr
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology-Cariology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway. jan.birkeland@odont.uib.no
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2002 Oct;60(5):281-9
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Matched-Pair Analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Social Class
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Since most studies of caries decline are descriptive time-trend analyses, the purpose of this article was to identify factors statistically associated with the caries decline among Norwegian adolescents after 1985. The DMFT scores for the age groups 12 and 18 years reported annually by 19 counties were analysed. The average caries-free proportions of 18-year-olds increased from 2% to 15% between 1985 and 2000, while the DMFT declined by 49%; 10.2 +/- 0.75 to 5.2 +/- 0.78. The decline for the 12-year-olds was 53%. The mean DT at the dentinal level remained at about 0.8 for 12-year-olds and 1.5 for 18-year-olds throughout the observation period. There was no significant difference in DMFT increment from age 12 to 18 between the birth cohorts 1973 (3.8 +/- 0.46) and 1982 (3.0 +/- 0.52) when controlling for counties. The variables migration and children per dentist were significantly associated with the DMFT decline in multivariate analyses. The caries decline for 18-year-olds was significantly steeper before than after 1990. The decline among the 18-year-olds may be attributed to fluoride and more restrictive criteria for placement of fillings in teenagers in the 1980s and fewer filled teeth before the age of 12 years in the 1990s.
PubMed ID
12418718 View in PubMed
Less detail

387 records – page 1 of 39.