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Accelerometer-determined physical activity and self-reported health in a population of older adults (65-85 years): a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264724
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Hilde Lohne-Seiler
Bjorge H Hansen
Elin Kolle
Sigmund A Anderssen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:284
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Abstract
The link between physical activity (PA) and prevention of disease, maintenance of independence, and improved quality of life in older adults is supported by strong evidence. However, there is a lack of data on population levels in this regard, where PA level has been measured objectively. The main aims were therefore to assess the level of accelerometer-determined PA and to examine its associations with self-reported health in a population of Norwegian older adults (65-85 years).
This was a part of a national multicenter study. Participants for the initial study were randomly selected from the national population registry, and the current study included those of the initial sample aged 65-85 years. The ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer was used to measure PA for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire was used to register self-reported health. Univariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustments were used for comparisons between multiple groups.
A total of 560 participants had valid activity registrations. Mean age (SD) was 71.8 (5.6) years for women (n=282) and 71.7 (5.2) years for men (n=278). Overall PA level (cpm) differed considerably between the age groups where the oldest (80-85 y) displayed a 50% lower activity level compared to the youngest (65-70 y). No sex differences were observed in overall PA within each age group. Significantly more men spent time being sedentary (65-69 and 70-74 years) and achieved more minutes of moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) (75-79 years) compared to women. Significantly more women (except for the oldest), spent more minutes of low-intensity PA compared to men. PA differed across levels of self-reported health and a 51% higher overall PA level was registered in those, with "very good health" compared to those with "poor/very poor health".
Norwegian older adults PA levels differed by age. Overall, the elderly spent 66% of their time being sedentary and only 3% in MVPA. Twenty one percent of the participants fulfilled the current Norwegian PA recommendations. Overall PA levels were associated with self-reported health.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24673834 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
Less detail

American and Icelandic parents' perceptions of the health status of their young children with chronic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15207
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirbergi, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Welfare
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Psychological
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify factors that influence American and Icelandic parents' health perceptions among families of infants or young children with asthma. DESIGN: A cross-sectional research design of 76 American families and 103 Icelandic families. Data were collected mainly in the Midwest of the United States (US) and in Iceland from August 1996 through January 2000. METHOD: Parents in these two countries who had children aged 6 or younger with chronic asthma completed questionnaires regarding family demands, caregiving demands, family hardiness, sense of coherence, and health perceptions. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and t tests were compiled. Multiple regression analysis was used to test path models and for mediation. FINDINGS: American parents differed from their Icelandic counterparts in family hardiness. In both countries, significant differences were found in caregiving demands and health perceptions between mothers and fathers. Illness severity and caregiving demands affected health perceptions of both mothers and fathers. Sense of coherence mediated the relationship between family demands and parents' perceptions for both parents. For mothers only, family hardiness mediated the relationship between family demands and health perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation was useful for building knowledge on parents' health perceptions in two Western cultures for families of young children with asthma. Interventions emphasizing family and individual resiliency and strengths have the potential to affect parents' views of their children's health.
PubMed ID
14735678 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An anamnestic method for studying the cause-effect connections between the status of public health and manufacturing, ecological and social factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216168
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(11):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
V A Voronin
G A Sorokin
V P Plekhanov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1995;(11):40-2
Date
1995
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ecology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking - methods - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Public Health
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The authors elaborated a medical and ecologic questionnaire for specific history. The questionnaire was applied to express-evaluation of public health state and environmental factors in the certain settlement. The health state was proved to be influenced significantly by occupational conditions, hardiness and intensity of work, psychologic climate. The most hazardous environmental factors are: unsatisfactory quality of drinkable water, air pollution and traffic noise. The lifestyle of the population examined is strongly associated with bad habits (smoking, short sleep, alcohol abuse).
PubMed ID
8689078 View in PubMed
Less detail

An oral health survey of Head Start children in Alaska: oral health status, treatment needs, and cost of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6187
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1992;52(2):86-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D B Jones
C M Schlife
K R Phipps
Author Affiliation
Alaska Area Native Health Service, Anchorage 99501.
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1992;52(2):86-93
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Child Day Care Centers
Child Health Services - economics - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Medical Indigency - economics - statistics & numerical data
Oral Health
Regression Analysis
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to obtain information on the oral health status, treatment needs, and cost of treatment for Head Start children in Alaska. Twenty communities, representing five regions within the state, were selected for participation. The study consisted of three distinct parts: a caries status exam, a sociodemographic questionnaire, and a treatment needs examination. A total of 544 children between three and five years old were examined. The mean dmft and dmfs scores were 3.91 and 8.73, respectively. When stratified by race, the Alaska Native children had significantly higher mean dmft and dmfs scores. When stratified by community of residence, those children residing in the rural communities had higher rates of dental caries than the urban children. Forty-five percent of the total sample was in need of dental restorative treatment, excluding examinations, radiographs, and preventive services. The proportion of rural children needing care was much higher than the urban children (59% vs 27%). On average, each urban child needed treatment on 0.7 teeth, while each rural child needed treatment on 2.8 teeth. When all treatment factors including sedation and transportation costs are considered, the potential cost of treatment for the 1,475 children enrolled in the Alaska Head Start programs was $601,624.
PubMed ID
1564696 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aspects of housing and perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older people in three national samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113316
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Signe Tomsone
Vibeke Horstmann
Frank Oswald
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Box 157, 221 00, Lund, Sweden. Signe.Tomsone@med.lu.se
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jun;25(3):317-28
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Dependency (Psychology)
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Germany
Health status
Housing
Humans
Independent Living - psychology
Latvia
Male
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Self Concept
Sweden
Abstract
Good housing solutions are important for the ageing population in order to promote health and maintain functional ability. The objective of this study was to investigate whether and how objective and perceived aspects of housing were related to perceived health among ADL independent and ADL dependent groups of older, single-living people within three national samples.
The current study was based on national samples (German, n = 450; Latvian, n = 303; Swedish, n = 397) from the European ENABLE-AGE Project, using data on ADL dependence, perceived health, objective and perceived aspects of housing. Descriptive statistics, correlations and multivariate ordinal regression models were used to analyze the data.
The participants in the ADL dependent groups generally were older, had more functional limitations and perceived their health as poorer compared to ADL independent groups. With regard to perceived housing, usability as well as meaning of home indicators was often lower in the ADL dependent groups, housing satisfaction was at the same level while housing-related external control beliefs were higher. The differences among the national samples were highly significant for both ADL groups, for all variables except number of outdoor environmental barriers in the ADL independent groups. The relations between perceived health on one hand and objective and perceived aspects of housing on the other show great diversities among the ADL groups and the national samples.
The results serve to alert health care practitioners that it is important to draw attention to how older people perceive their housing situation and to the fact that different levels of functional independence demand different interventions.
PubMed ID
23740591 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing movement quality in persons with severe mental illness - Reliability and validity of the Body Awareness Scale Movement Quality and Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281756
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2016 May;32(4):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Lena Hedlund
Amanda Lundvik Gyllensten
Tomas Waldegren
Lars Hansson
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2016 May;32(4):296-306
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Awareness
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Body Image
Checklist
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Motor Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Muscle Fatigue
Observer Variation
Physical Examination
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - physiopathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Motor disturbances and disturbed self-recognition are common features that affect mobility in persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and bipolar disorder. Physiotherapists in Scandinavia assess and treat movement difficulties in persons with severe mental illness. The Body Awareness Scale Movement Quality and Experience (BAS MQ-E) is a new and shortened version of the commonly used Body Awareness Scale-Health (BAS-H). The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability and the concurrent validity of BAS MQ-E in persons with severe mental illness. The concurrent validity was examined by investigating the relationships between neurological soft signs, alexithymia, fatigue, anxiety, and mastery. Sixty-two persons with severe mental illness participated in the study. The results showed a satisfactory inter-rater reliability (n = 53) and a concurrent validity (n = 62) with neurological soft signs, especially cognitive and perceptual based signs. There was also a concurrent validity linked to physical fatigue and aspects of alexithymia. The scores of BAS MQ-E were in general higher for persons with schizophrenia compared to persons with other diagnoses within the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. The clinical implications are presented in the discussion.
PubMed ID
27050236 View in PubMed
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The association between accelerometer-measured patterns of sedentary time and health risk in children and youth: results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115533
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Rachel C Colley
Didier Garriguet
Ian Janssen
Suzy L Wong
Travis J Saunders
Valerie Carson
Mark S Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada. rcolley@cheo.on.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:200
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Time Factors
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-reported screen time is associated with elevated health risk in children and youth; however, research examining the relationship between accelerometer-measured sedentary time and health risk has reported mixed findings. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between accelerometer-measured patterns of sedentary time and health risk in children and youth.
The results are based on 1,608 children and youth aged 6 to 19 years from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007-2009). Sedentary time was measured using the Actical accelerometer. Breaks in sedentary time and prolonged bouts of sedentary time lasting 20 to 120 minutes were derived for all days, weekend days and during the after-school period (i.e., after 3 pm on weekdays). Regression analyses were used to examine the association between patterns of sedentary time and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure and non-HDL cholesterol.
Boys accumulated more sedentary time on weekdays after 3 pm and had a higher number of breaks in sedentary time compared to girls. Overweight/obese boys (aged 6-19 years) accumulated more sedentary time after 3 pm on weekdays (282 vs. 259 min, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23497190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between health-related quality of life, physical fitness, and physical activity in older adults recently discharged from hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103082
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):405-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Therese Brovold
Dawn A Skelton
Hilde Sylliaas
Morten Mowe
Astrid Bergland
Author Affiliation
Inst. of Physical Therapy, Oslo, and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jul;22(3):405-13
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Norway
Patient Discharge
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship among health-related quality of life (HRQOL), physical fitness, and physical activity in older patients after recent discharge from hospital. One hundred fifteen independent-living older adults (ages 70-92 years) were included. HRQOL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey), physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly), and physical fitness (Senior Fitness Test) were measured 2-4 weeks after discharge. Higher levels of physical activity and physical fitness were correlated with higher self-reported HRQOL. Although cause and effect cannot be determined from this study, the results suggest that a particular focus on the value of physical activity and physical fitness while in hospital and when discharged from hospital may be important to encourage patients to actively preserve independence and HRQOL. It may be especially important to target those with lower levels of physical activity, poorer physical fitness, and multiple comorbidities.
PubMed ID
23981441 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between prevalent neck pain and health-related quality of life: a cross-sectional analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154122
Source
Eur Spine J. 2009 Mar;18(3):371-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Mana Rezai
Pierre Côté
J David Cassidy
Linda Carroll
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. mrezai@uhnresearch.ca
Source
Eur Spine J. 2009 Mar;18(3):371-81
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health status
Humans
Illness Behavior
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Quality of Life - psychology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Selection Bias
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the association between grades of neck pain severity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), using a population-based, cross-sectional mailed survey. The literature suggests that physical and mental HRQoL is worse for individuals with neck pain compared to those without neck pain. However, the strength of the association varies across studies. Discrepancies in study results may be attributed to the use of different definitions and measures of neck pain and differences in the selection of covariates used as control variables in the analyses. The Saskatchewan Health and Back Pain Survey was mailed to 2,184 randomly selected Saskatchewan adults of whom 1,131 returned the questionnaire. Neck pain was measured with the Chronic Pain Questionnaire and categorized into four increasing grades of severity. We measured HRQoL with the SF-36 Health Survey and computed the physical and mental component summary scores. We built separate multiple linear regression models to examine the association between grades of neck pain and physical and mental summary scores while controlling for sociodemographic, general health and comorbidity covariates. Our crude analysis suggests that a gradient exists between the severity of neck pain and HRQoL. Compared to individuals without neck pain, those with Grades III-IV neck pain have significantly lower physical (mean difference = -13.9/100; 95% CI = -16.4, -11.3) and mental (mean difference = -10.8/100; 95% CI = -13.6, -8.1) HRQoL. Controlling for covariates greatly reduced the strength of association between neck pain and physical HRQoL and accounted for the observed association between neck pain and mental HRQoL. In the comorbidity model, the strength of association between Grades III-IV neck pain and PCS decreased by more than 50% (mean difference = -4.5/100; 95% CI = -6.9, -2.0). In the final PCS model, Grades III-IV neck pain coefficients changed only slightly from the comorbidity model (mean difference = -4.4/100; 95% CI = -6.9, -1.9). This suggests that comorbid conditions account for most of the association between neck pain and PCS score. It was concluded that prevalent neck pain is weakly associated with physical HRQoL, and that it is not associated with mental HRQoL. Our cross-sectional analysis suggests that most of the observed association between prevalent neck pain and HRQoL is attributable to comorbidities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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