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The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin is related with carotid artery intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilatation in young adults--the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140840
Source
Ann Med. 2010 Dec;42(8):603-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Liisa A Saarikoski
Risto K Huupponen
Jorma S A Viikari
Jukka Marniemi
Markus Juonala
Mika Kähönen
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 2010 Dec;42(8):603-11
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Biological Markers - blood
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Elasticity Imaging Techniques
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Regional Blood Flow
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
Adiponectin may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We investigated the relation of adiponectin on early functional and structural markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large population-based cohort of young men and women.
We measured serum adiponectin using radioimmunoassay in 2,147 young adults (ages 24-39 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. The subjects had ultrasound data on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid artery elasticity (n = 2,139) and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) (n = 1,996). In univariate analysis, adiponectin was inversely associated with IMT (r = -0.16, P
PubMed ID
20839916 View in PubMed
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Adoption of new antiglaucoma drugs in Finland: impact of changes in copayment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159654
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Nov;29(11):2468-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Jaana E Martikainen
Unto Häkkinen
Hannes Enlund
Author Affiliation
Research Department, The Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.martikainen@kela.fi
Source
Clin Ther. 2007 Nov;29(11):2468-76
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Drug Utilization
Finland - epidemiology
Glaucoma - drug therapy - economics - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement
Models, Statistical
Prostaglandins - economics - therapeutic use
Prostaglandins F, Synthetic - economics - therapeutic use
Regression Analysis
Sulfonamides - economics - therapeutic use
Thiophenes - economics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Copayments are common measures intended to control drug expenditures and promote rational prescribing. In Finland, new antiglaucoma drugs start with a high copayment, but once sufficient clinical experience is available, they are reevaluated and can receive a lower copayment status.
This study assessed the effect of changes in copayment level on the adoption of 2 antiglaucoma drugs.
A retrospective analysis was performed from 1997 to 2001 using the Finnish national register of reimbursed drug purchases, which covers approximately 98% of all antiglaucoma drug purchases in the country. There were 172,293 purchases of dorzolamide (plain or combined with timolol) and 281,377 purchases of latanoprost. An interrupted time-series design from approximately 30 months before and 20 months after the change in copayment was used in the analysis. The main outcome measures were the numbers of defined daily doses (DDDs) purchased and the monthly numbers of patients who purchased the study drugs for the first time before and after the change in copayment.
A substantial increase in consumption of both dorzolamide and latanoprost was seen immediately after the introduction of the lower copayment. The monthly consumption of dorzolamide was 60,713 DDDs higher and the monthly consumption of latanoprost was 49,330 DDDs higher than expected according to the utilization trend during the higher copayment period. Twelve months later, the observed consumption of dorzolamide was 109% higher and that of latanoprost was 21% higher than if the copayment had remained the same. The number of new patients using the study drugs peaked within 2 months of the lower copayment, but the amount consumed per patient per day remained quite stable.
Decreasing the copayment of a new antiglaucoma drug to the same level as the copayments of alternative drugs accelerated the adoption of these new products in Finland.
PubMed ID
18158088 View in PubMed
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Age and meanings of violence: women's experiences of partner violence in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182328
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jan;19(1):30-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Minna Piispa
Author Affiliation
Statistics Finland.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2004 Jan;19(1):30-48
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Chi-Square Distribution
Culture
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Emotions - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Change Events
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Self Disclosure
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The first survey carried out in Finland specifically to study men's violence against women showed that partner violence is quite common in Finland and it is directed especially toward young women. The statistical findings don't support the idea that violence has become more widespread in Finland. Life situation factors that are usually viewed as making women vulnerable to spousal violence, such as having children, cohabiting, low educational level, and financial dependency on the male partner, failed to explain partnership violence against women in Finland as such, too. The author's objective is to find out whether meanings of violence have changed and whether this could be one reason why young women report in a survey such cases of violence that other women would not. This could explain why violence in partnerships is so common among young women in Finland.
PubMed ID
14680528 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and coronary heart disease risk--is there an unknown confounder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173661
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Kari Poikolainen
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Anne Linna
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland. kari.poikolainen@stakes.fi
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
To evaluate whether confounding by several known or suspected coronary heart disease risk factors are likely to explain the lower coronary heart disease risk among light alcohol drinkers compared with never-drinkers.
A population-based cross-sectional study.
Hypertension, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, depression, sleep disturbances, smoking, physical activity, life satisfaction, psychological distress, trait anxiety, independent and dependent life events, length of working hours, job control, job strain and effort-reward imbalance were compared between never-drinkers and light drinkers (
PubMed ID
16042645 View in PubMed
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Alcohol sales and fatal alcohol poisonings: a time-series analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189225
Source
Addiction. 2002 Aug;97(8):1037-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Kari Poikolainen
Kalervo Leppänen
Erkki Vuori
Author Affiliation
Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland. kari.poikolainen@stakes.fi
Source
Addiction. 2002 Aug;97(8):1037-40
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Alcoholic Beverages - supply & distribution
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Central Nervous System Depressants - poisoning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethanol - poisoning
Finland - epidemiology
Holidays - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To discover whether the number of fatal alcohol peaks during festivities characterized by unrestrained drinking and relates to sales of alcoholic beverages.
Time-series and cross-sectional.
Fatal alcohol poisonings and retail alcohol sales in Finland in 1983-99.
Fatal alcohol poisonings were found to peak during weekends and in the May Day, Midsummer Day and Christmas celebrations. Regression analysis of quarterly series lead to a model showing that 1% increase in the sales of spirits increases the number of fatal alcohol poisonings by 0.4%.
At the population level, increases in the sales of spirits and periods of hard drinking seem to increase deaths from alcohol poisoning. The findings could be of use in efforts to decrease hard drinking.
Notes
Comment In: Addiction. 2004 Oct;99(10):1356-815369578
Comment In: Addiction. 2002 Aug;97(8):92912144590
PubMed ID
12144606 View in PubMed
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Angina pectoris: relation of epidemiological survey to registry data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135757
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2011 Aug;18(4):621-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Tea Lallukka
Kristiina Manderbacka
Ilmo Keskimäki
Harry Hemingway
Ossi Rahkonen
Eero Lahelma
Reunanen Antti
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. tea.lallukka@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2011 Aug;18(4):621-6
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angina Pectoris - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Agents - economics
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Self-reported angina symptoms are collected in epidemiological surveys. We aimed at validating the angina symptoms assessed by the Rose Questionnaire against registry data on coronary heart disease. A further aim was to examine the sex paradox in angina implying that women report more symptoms, whereas men have more coronary events.
Angina symptoms of 6601 employees of the City of Helsinki were examined using the postal questionnaire survey data combined with coronary heart disease registries.
The self-reported angina was classified as no symptoms, atypical pain, exertional chest pain, and stable angina symptoms. Reimbursed medications and hospital admissions were available from registries 10 years before the survey. Binomial regression analysis was used.
Stable angina symptoms were associated with hospital admissions and reimbursed medications [prevalence ratio (PR), 6.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 4.56-9.99]. In addition, exertional chest pain (PR, 5.31; 95% CI, 3.45-8.18) was associated with coronary events. All events were more prevalent among men than women (PR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.72-3.25).
The Rose Questionnaire remains a valid tool to distinguish healthy people from those with coronary heart disease. However, a notable part of those reporting symptoms have no confirmation of coronary heart disease in the registries. The female excess of symptoms and male excess of events may reflect inequality or delay in access to treatment, problems in identification and diagnosis, or more complex issues related to self-reported angina symptoms.
PubMed ID
21450561 View in PubMed
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Are mortality differences and trends by education any better or worse in New Zealand? A comparison study with Norway, Denmark and Finland, 1980-1990s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83281
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(8):683-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Fawcett Jackie
Blakely Tony
Kunst Anton
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago, Mein Street, PO Box 7343, Wellington, Newtown, New Zealand. jackie.fawcett@wnmeds.ac.nz
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(8):683-91
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
New Zealand - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Abstract
During the 1980s and early 1990s New Zealand experienced major social and economic change, decreasing all-cause mortality rates for the majority ethnic group, and high (but falling) cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates. This paper explores whether inequalities in mortality by education were greater, and increased more, in New Zealand than in Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway), and determines the contribution of CVD to these differences and trends. METHODS: We used mortality rates for 30-59 year olds by education, and slope (SII) and relative (RII) indices of inequality, calculated from comparable linked census mortality data. RESULTS: Mortality inequalities in New Zealand were at the high end of the Nordic range when standardised by age only, but were mid-range when also standardised by ethnicity. Over time, relative inequalities in all-cause mortality increased similarly in all countries. In New Zealand a large increase in inequality for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality was the major contributor. In contrast both CVD and other causes of death were important drivers of increasing inequalities in Nordic countries. Absolute inequalities in all-cause mortality were stable over time among males across all countries, and increased modestly among females. The contribution of CVD to absolute inequality was stable or decreasing over time in all countries. CONCLUSION: Overall, inequalities in mortality in New Zealand did not widen more rapidly than in northern European countries. However, rapid social and economic change may have affected trends in CVD mortality among low educated men and women, and especially the ethnic minority groups.
PubMed ID
16151882 View in PubMed
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Association between duration of untreated psychosis and brain morphology in schizophrenia within the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140885
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Nov;123(2-3):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Matti Penttilä
Erika Jääskeläinen
Marianne Haapea
Päivikki Tanskanen
Juha Veijola
Khanum Ridler
Graham K Murray
Anna Barnes
Peter B Jones
Matti Isohanni
Hannu Koponen
Jouko Miettunen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. mattipen@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Nov;123(2-3):145-52
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - pathology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Functional Laterality
Hippocampus - pathology
Humans
Limbic System - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Psychotic Disorders - etiology - pathology
Regression Analysis
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - pathology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) has been linked with poor prognosis and changes in the brain structure in schizophrenia at least at the beginning of the disease, but it is still unknown whether DUP relates to brain morphometry in the longer term. Our aim was to analyze the relation between DUP and the brain structure in schizophrenia in the general population, after several years of illness.
Brains of subjects with psychosis from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (NFBC 1966) were scanned with MRI during 1999-2001 after an 11-year follow-up. DUP was assessed from medical records and regressed against global and local tissue density measurements. The brain morphometric and the DUP information were available for 46 subjects with DSM-III-R schizophrenia.
The DUP did not correlate with volumes of the total gray or white matter or the cerebrospinal fluid. The length of DUP associated positively with reduced densities of the right limbic area and the right hippocampus.
Long DUP was slightly associated with reductions of gray matter densities in the limbic area and especially the hippocampus after several years follow-up, supporting the hypothesis that, compared to short DUP, long DUP might be a marker of different disease trajectories including subtle morphometric changes.
PubMed ID
20832996 View in PubMed
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Association between mid-life marital status and cognitive function in later life: population based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149912
Source
BMJ. 2009;339:b2462
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Krister HÃ¥kansson
Suvi Rovio
Eeva-Liisa Helkala
Anna-Riitta Vilska
Bengt Winblad
Hilkka Soininen
Aulikki Nissinen
Abdul H Mohammed
Miia Kivipelto
Author Affiliation
School of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Växjö University, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 2009;339:b2462
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - blood - epidemiology - psychology
Apolipoprotein E4 - metabolism
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To evaluate whether mid-life marital status is related to cognitive function in later life.
Prospective population based study with an average follow-up of 21 years.
Kuopio and Joensuu regions in eastern Finland.
Participants were derived from random, population based samples previously investigated in 1972, 1977, 1982, or 1987; 1449 individuals (73%), aged 65-79, underwent re-examination in 1998.
Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.
People cohabiting with a partner in mid-life (mean age 50.4) were less likely than all other categories (single, separated, or widowed) to show cognitive impairment later in life at ages 65-79. Those widowed or divorced in mid-life and still so at follow-up had three times the risk compared with married or cohabiting people. Those widowed both at mid-life and later life had an odds ratio of 7.67 (1.6 to 40.0) for Alzheimer's disease compared with married or cohabiting people. The highest increased risk for Alzheimer's disease was in carriers of the apolipoprotein E e4 allele who lost their partner before mid-life and were still widowed or divorced at follow-up. The progressive entering of several adjustment variables from mid-life did not alter these associations.
Living in a relationship with a partner might imply cognitive and social challenges that have a protective effect against cognitive impairment later in life, consistent with the brain reserve hypothesis. The specific increased risk for widowed and divorced people compared with single people indicates that other factors are needed to explain parts of the results. A sociogenetic disease model might explain the dramatic increase in risk of Alzheimer's disease for widowed apolipoprotein E e4 carriers.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2009;339:b169019574311
PubMed ID
19574312 View in PubMed
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247 records – page 1 of 25.