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The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal social organization, contemporary experience and American Indian adolescent alcohol use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9665
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Paul Spicer
Douglas K Novins
Christina M Mitchell
Janette Beals
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, P.O. Box 6508, Mailstop F800, Aurora, Colorado 80045, USA. paul.spicer@uchsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Jul;64(4):450-7
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
United States - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Anthropologists with an interest in American Indian alcohol use have long held that how native people drink has been conditioned by aspects of the social organization of their societies prior to the disruptive influences of European colonialism. Our goal in this article was to explicitly test the importance of these factors in four contemporary American Indian cultural groups. METHOD: Using data on adolescent alcohol use drawn from the first full wave of the longitudinal Voices of Indian Teens Project (N = 1,651, 51% female), we tested whether patterns of quantity-frequency of alcohol use and the negative consequences of alcohol use predicted by social organzational variables were found among contemporary adolescents and, subsequently, whether these differences persisted when other, more proximal, variables were included. RESULTS: Cultural differences appeared to account for a small percentage of the variance in both quantity-frequency of alcohol use and negative consequences in the initial steps of our analyses, but the pattern in these data was not consistent with the predictions of existing theories regarding aboriginal social organization. Moreover, these cultural differences were no longer significant in the final step of our analyses, suggesting that the cultural differences that did exist were better explained by other factors, at least among these adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: Although these analyses did not indicate that culture was irrelevant in understanding adolescent alcohol use in American Indian communities, classic formulations of these effects were of limited utility in understanding the experiences of contemporary American Indian adolescents.
Notes
Erratum In: J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jan;65(1):153
PubMed ID
12921186 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48242
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
Z. Trajanoski
G A Brunner
R J Gfrerer
P. Wach
T R Pieber
Author Affiliation
Department of Biophysics, Graz University of Technology, Austria. trajanoski@ibmt.tu-graz.ac.at
Source
Diabetes Care. 1996 Dec;19(12):1412-5
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Glucose - analysis
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring - instrumentation - standards
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Glucose Clamp Technique
Humans
Hypoglycemia - blood - diagnosis
Reference Standards
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of home blood glucose meters during hypoglycemia. METHODS: Six blood glucose meters-One Touch II (LifeScan, Milpitas, CA), Companion II (Medisense, Cambridge, U.K.), Reflolux (Boehringer Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany), Accutrend (Boehringer Mannheim), Elite (Bayer, Munich, Germany), and HemoCue (HemoCue, Angelholm, Sweden)-were compared with a reference method (Beckman Glucose Analyzer 2). Glucose concentrations from arterialized venous blood samples were measured using all glucose meters (whole blood) and the reference method (plasma) during hypoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In total, 663 blood glucose monitor readings and 119 reference values ranging from 2.28 to 3.89 mmol/l were analyzed. The correlation coefficients and the percentage of measurements within 20% and outside 40% of the reference values for each glucose meter were as follows: One Touch II: 0.91, 99.2% and 0%; Companion II: 0.81, 88.2% and 2.5%; Reflolux: 0.78, 85.0% and 0.9%; Accutrend: 0.88, 46.0% and 6.6%; Elite: 0.78, 75.6% and 4.2%; and HemoCue: 0.93, 96.6% and 0% (P
Notes
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1204-5; author reply 1206-79203465
Comment In: Diabetes Care. 1997 Jul;20(7):1205-79203466
PubMed ID
8941473 View in PubMed
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Aclarubicin plus cytosine arabinoside versus daunorubicin plus cytosine arabinoside in previously untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia: a Danish national phase III trial. The Danish Society of Hematology Study Group on AML, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24824
Source
Leukemia. 1991 Jun;5(6):510-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
O P Hansen
J. Pedersen-Bjergaard
J. Ellegaard
H. Brincker
A M Boesen
B E Christensen
A. Drivsholm
E. Hippe
H. Jans
K B Jensen
Author Affiliation
Finsen Institute-Rigshospitalet, Department of Hematology L, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Leukemia. 1991 Jun;5(6):510-6
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aclarubicin - administration & dosage
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Amsacrine - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cytarabine - administration & dosage
Daunorubicin - administration & dosage
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Etoposide - administration & dosage
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Remission Induction
Survival Rate
Abstract
A regimen of aclarubicin (ACR) of 75 mg/m2 daily for 3 days plus a continuous intravenous infusion of cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) of 100 mg/m2 per day for 7 days was compared with daunorubicin (DNR) 45 mg/m2/day for 3 days plus ara-C for 7 days as first-line chemotherapy of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a randomized, nationwide Danish study. A total of 180 patients aged between 17 and 65 years were entered onto the protocol. Patients who achieved complete remission (CR) were given five courses of intensive consolidation therapy consisting of two courses of high dose ara-C, two courses of amsacrine plus etoposide, and one course of DNR plus ara-C. Of 174 evaluable patients, 99 achieved CR. The rate of CR was significantly higher on ACR plus ara-C than on DNR plus ara-C [66% versus 50% (p = 0.043)] and decreased significantly with increasing age. The hematological toxicity was identical for the two regimens. A total of 83 patients entered consolidation therapy. At 4 years, 37% of patients with CR following ACR were still in remission compared with 33% following DNR (p = 0.48), and the total survival at 4 years was 29% versus 20% (p = 0.26). The duration of remission and total survival both decreased with increasing age. ACR plus ara-C seem at least as good or better than DNR plus ara-C as first-line chemotherapy of AML.
PubMed ID
2056774 View in PubMed
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Adrenal medullary overactivity in lean, borderline hypertensive young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9447
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2004 Jul;17(7):611-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Henrik M Reims
Eigil Fossum
Aud Høieggen
Andreas Moan
Ivar Eide
Sverre E Kjeldsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Hypertens. 2004 Jul;17(7):611-8
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Gland Diseases - blood - physiopathology
Adrenal Medulla - metabolism - physiopathology
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Hypertension - blood - physiopathology
Insulin - metabolism
Male
Norepinephrine - blood
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - blood - physiopathology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rest
Statistics
Stress, Psychological - blood
Thinness - blood - physiopathology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There may be a link among stress, adrenal medullary activation, and the development of hypertension. Obesity is characterized by sympathetic activation and predisposes to hypertension, but may be associated with low or normal adrenal medullary activity. We hypothesized that plasma epinephrine (E) levels and adrenal medullary responsiveness to mental stress are lower in overweight than in lean borderline hypertensive subjects. METHODS: We compared groups of lean (n = 62) and overweight (n = 29) borderline hypertensive young men as well as lean (n = 36) and overweight (n = 7) normotensive young men from the same population. Plasma catecholamines and heart rate (HR) were measured at rest during a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp and during mental arithmetic-induced stress. RESULTS: Plasma norepinephrine (NE) and E, HR, and responses to stress were increased in borderline hypertensive subjects. Our results showed that NE was increased only in lean borderline hypertensive subjects at rest, but in overweight subjects as well during stress, with DeltaNE being similar in lean and overweight subjects. We found that E was higher in lean than in overweight borderline hypertensive subjects at rest and during stress (both P
PubMed ID
15233980 View in PubMed
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The ageing of lung function: cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3559
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Sep;7(9):1653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
A. Rode
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Sep;7(9):1653-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Aging - physiology
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - ethnology
Smoking - physiopathology
Abstract
Three surveys (1969/1970, 1979/1980 and 1989/1990) have examined the impact of acculturation to a sedentary lifestyle on the pulmonary function of a circumpolar native Inuit community. The sample comprised more than 50% of those aged 20-60 yrs, most recently 119 males and 92 females. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) were measured by standard spirometric techniques, and information was obtained on smoking habits and health. Multiple regression equations showed that lung function was affected by height and age, but usually not by age squared. Cross-sectional age coefficients for FVC and FEV1 increased over the period 1969/1970 to 1989/1990. Parallel longitudinal trends were seen in FEV1 (males only). Multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed age-decade*cohort effects for FVC and FEV1 (males but not females). Almost all of the population now smoke (mean +/- SD males 13 +/- 8 cigarettes.day-1; females 11 +/- 7 cigarettes.day-1). However, smoking bears little relationship to lung function perhaps due to limited variance in consumption. About a third of the community have physician-diagnosed and/or radiographically visible chest disease, but with little effect upon pulmonary function. We conclude that an apparent secular trend to a faster ageing of lung function in men is not explained by disease or domestic air pollution. Possible factors include increased lung volumes in young adults, greater pack-years of cigarette exposure, nonspecific respiratory disease, increased inspiration of cold air or altered chest mechanics due to operation of high-speed snowmobiles, and loss of physical fitness.
PubMed ID
7995396 View in PubMed
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Age patterns of mortality and cause-of-death structures in Sweden, Japan, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68504
Source
Demography. 1994 Nov;31(4):633-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
C L Himes
Author Affiliation
Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, University Park 16802.
Source
Demography. 1994 Nov;31(4):633-50
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disease - classification
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Japan - epidemiology
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Suicide
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper uses a new standard model of adult mortality to compare the mortality patterns of Swedes, Japanese, and U.S. whites between 1950 and 1985. It examines changes in the age patterns of mortality and the cause-of-death structures within the populations, and the relationships between those two factors. As Japan has reached a level of mortality similar to that in Sweden, the age patterns of mortality in the two populations have become more similar despite distinct differences in causes of death. The United States has a cause-of-death structure similar to that of Sweden, but the age pattern of mortality is very different. High mortality in the middle age range in the United States results in approximately a one-year loss of life expectancy at age 45 in comparison with Sweden.
PubMed ID
7890097 View in PubMed
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Airways symptoms, immunological response and exposure in powder painting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15090
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Mar;78(2):123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Anna Blomqvist
Meltem Düzakin-Nystedt
Carl-Göran Ohlson
Lennart Andersson
Bo Jönsson
Jörn Nielsen
Hans Welinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2005 Mar;78(2):123-31
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aerosols - toxicity
Aged
Anhydrides - blood - immunology - urine
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Immunoglobulin G
Industry
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Lung Volume Measurements
Mass Fragmentography
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Paint - toxicity
Powders - toxicity
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Powder painting is an alternative to solvent-based spray painting. Powder paints may contain organic acid anhydrides (OAAs), which are irritants to the airways and may cause sensitisation. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and immunological response among powder painters and to describe the exposure to OAAs. METHODS: In all, 205 subjects in 32 enterprises participated: 93 exposed and 26 formerly exposed workers in 25 powder paint shops and 86 unexposed workers. They completed a questionnaire about working conditions and symptoms and took part in a medical examination, which included a lung function test. Urine samples, for determination of two OAAs, and blood samples, for analysis of specific antibodies against the OAAs, were taken. In addition, 33 paint samples were analysed for nine OAAs. RESULTS: The powder painters reported more work-related respiratory symptoms than unexposed subjects did. The prevalence of three or more symptoms was 24% in subjects with low exposure, 44% in highly exposed individuals, 46% in formerly exposed subjects and 19% in unexposed workers. Asthma symptoms were frequent, 7%, 40%, 15% and 2%, respectively. Regression analyses of the lung volumes did not show any influence of exposure. IgG, but not IgE, against the OAAs and metabolites of OAAs was found in some subjects, but no associations with the exposure could be observed. OAAs were found in only small amounts in the paint samples. CONCLUSIONS: The exposure to organic acid anhydrides was estimated to be low, and yet, IgG antibodies to OAA were observed in some subjects. The prevalence of work-related symptoms from the eyes and the airways was relatively high among the powder painters, and these symptoms, but not the lung volumes, were clearly related to exposure. The symptoms were probably caused by irritative properties of the powder paint dust.
PubMed ID
15726393 View in PubMed
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American and Icelandic parents' perceptions of the health status of their young children with chronic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15207
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdóttir
Mary Kay Rayens
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, Eirbergi, Eiriksgata 34, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. eks@hi.is
Source
J Nurs Scholarsh. 2003;35(4):351-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Welfare
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost of Illness
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Iceland
Male
Midwestern United States
Models, Psychological
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Workload
Abstract
PURPOSE: To identify factors that influence American and Icelandic parents' health perceptions among families of infants or young children with asthma. DESIGN: A cross-sectional research design of 76 American families and 103 Icelandic families. Data were collected mainly in the Midwest of the United States (US) and in Iceland from August 1996 through January 2000. METHOD: Parents in these two countries who had children aged 6 or younger with chronic asthma completed questionnaires regarding family demands, caregiving demands, family hardiness, sense of coherence, and health perceptions. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and t tests were compiled. Multiple regression analysis was used to test path models and for mediation. FINDINGS: American parents differed from their Icelandic counterparts in family hardiness. In both countries, significant differences were found in caregiving demands and health perceptions between mothers and fathers. Illness severity and caregiving demands affected health perceptions of both mothers and fathers. Sense of coherence mediated the relationship between family demands and parents' perceptions for both parents. For mothers only, family hardiness mediated the relationship between family demands and health perceptions. CONCLUSIONS: The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation was useful for building knowledge on parents' health perceptions in two Western cultures for families of young children with asthma. Interventions emphasizing family and individual resiliency and strengths have the potential to affect parents' views of their children's health.
PubMed ID
14735678 View in PubMed
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236 records – page 1 of 24.