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A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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30-year mortality after venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257922
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2014
Author
Kirstine Kobberøe Søgaard
Morten Schmidt
Lars Pedersen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. kks@clin.au.dk.
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Date
Sep-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on long-term mortality after venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse.
Using Danish medical databases, we conducted a 30-year nationwide population-based cohort study of 128 223 patients with first-time VTE (1980-2011) and a comparison cohort of 640 760 people from the general population (without VTE) randomly matched by sex, year of birth, and calendar period. The mortality risks for patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were markedly higher than for the comparison cohort during the first year, especially within the first 30 days (3.0% and 31% versus 0.4%). Using Cox regression, we assessed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall 30-year MRR was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.53-1.57) for DVT and 2.77 (95% CI, 2.74-2.81) for PE. The 30-day MRR was 5.38 (95% CI, 5.00-5.80) for DVT and 80.87 (95% CI, 76.02-86.02) for PE. Over time, the 30-day MRR was consistently 5- to 6-fold increased for DVT, whereas it improved for PE from 138 (95% CI, 125-153) in 1980 to 1989 to 36.08 (95% CI, 32.65-39.87) in 2000 to 2011. The 1- to 10-year and 11- to 30-year MRRs remained 25% to 40% increased after both DVT and PE but were 3- to 5-fold increased after DVT and 6- to 11-fold increased after PE when VTE was considered the immediate cause of death.
Patients with VTE are at increased risk of dying, especially within the first year after diagnosis, but also during the entire 30 years of follow-up, with VTE as an important cause of death. Although 30-day mortality after DVT remained fairly constant over the last 3 decades, it improved markedly for PE.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49625027484
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49725027486
PubMed ID
24970783 View in PubMed
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Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72190
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Lindencrona
A. Ek
Author Affiliation
Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 236, SE-462 23, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75+ years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.
PubMed ID
10760543 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral regimens in HIV patients: a Danish nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137186
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Jul;72(1):116-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Tonny S Petersen
Stig E Andersen
January Gerstoft
Kristina Thorsteinsson
Carsten S Larsen
Gitte Pedersen
Court Pedersen
Niels Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen, Denmark. tsp@person.dk
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Jul;72(1):116-24
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - methods - standards
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Guideline Adherence
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Regression Analysis
State Medicine
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To determine the adherence to the national guidelines for start of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in HIV infected patients.
We used a Danish nationwide cohort of HIV infected patients to calculate the fraction of patients who in the period 1997-2006 started HAART according to the guidelines from The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases. We used Kaplan-Meier tables to estimate time from fulfilling the criteria for start of HAART to initiation of the treatment. Cox regression and logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for delayed initiation of treatment and chance of being included in clinical trials.
The study included 3223 patients, 74% of whom initiated HAART in the study period. Ninety-four% fulfilled the criteria for start of HAART, with minor differences over calendar periods. Ninety-four% initiated a recommended regimen or were included in a clinical trial. Intravenous drug use predicted initiation of a non-recommended regimen and delay in start of HAART, while non-Caucasians were less likely to be included in clinical trials.
In a Western world setting, the adherence to national guidelines for start of HAART can be high. We suggest that simplicity of the guidelines, centralization of treatment and involvement of local clinicians in the development of guidelines are of major importance for high adherence to treatment guidelines.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21306418 View in PubMed
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Admission hyperglycemia predicts a worse outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153259
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Apr;32(4):617-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Alexandre Y Poppe
Sumit R Majumdar
Thomas Jeerakathil
William Ghali
Alastair M Buchan
Michael D Hill
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. alexander.poppe@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Apr;32(4):617-22
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Cerebral Hemorrhage - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Admission hyperglycemia has been associated with worse outcomes in ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia (glucose >8.0 mmol/l) in the hyperacute phase would be independently associated with increased mortality, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), and poor functional status at 90 days in stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA).
Using data from the prospective, multicenter Canadian Alteplase for Stroke Effectiveness Study (CASES), the association between admission glucose >8.0 mmol/l and mortality, SICH, and poor functional status at 90 days (modified Rankin Scale >1) was examined. Similar analyses examining glucose as a continuous measure were conducted.
Of 1,098 patients, 296 (27%) had admission hyperglycemia, including 18% of those without diabetes and 70% of those with diabetes. After multivariable logistic regression, admission hyperglycemia was found to be independently associated with increased risk of death (adjusted risk ratio 1.5 [95% CI 1.2-1.9]), SICH (1.69 [0.95-3.00]), and a decreased probability of a favorable outcome at 90 days (0.7 [0.5-0.9]). An incremental risk of death and SICH and unfavorable 90-day outcomes was observed with increasing admission glucose. This observation held true for patients with and without diabetes.
In this cohort of IV-tPA-treated stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia was independently associated with increased risk of death, SICH, and poor functional status at 90 days. Treatment trials continue to be urgently needed to determine whether this is a modifiable risk factor for poor outcome.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19131465 View in PubMed
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Adult body height of twins compared with that of singletons: a register-based birth cohort study of Norwegian males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115100
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Willy Eriksen
Jon M Sundet
Kristian Tambs
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2013 May 1;177(9):1015-9
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth Certificates
Body Height - genetics
Cohort Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Regression Analysis
Siblings
Twins
Young Adult
Abstract
In the present study, we evaluated whether childhood differences in body height between singletons and twins persist into adulthood. Data from the Medical Birth Register of Norway were linked with data from the Norwegian National Conscript Service. This study used data on the 457,999 males who were born alive and without physical anomalies in single or twin births in Norway during 1967-1984 and who were examined at the mandatory military conscription (age 18-20 years; 1985-2003). For sibling comparisons, the authors selected the 1,721 sibships of full brothers that included at least 1 male born in a single birth and at least 1 male born in a twin birth (4,520 persons, including 2,493 twins and 2,027 singletons). An analysis of the total study population using generalized estimating equations showed that the twins were 0.6 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.4, 0.7) shorter than were the singletons after adjustment for a series of background factors. The fixed-effects regression analysis of the sibships that included both twins and singletons showed that the twins were 0.9 cm (95% confidence interval: 0.6, 1.2) shorter than were their singleton brothers. The study suggests that male twins born in Norway during 1967-1984 were slightly shorter in early adulthood than were singletons.
PubMed ID
23543161 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of psychosocial stress on gonadal function and insulin levels in middle-aged males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11406
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 May;237(5):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
P M Nilsson
L. Møller
K. Solstad
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Centre, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1995 May;237(5):479-86
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
C-Peptide - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Genitalia, Male - physiopathology
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Insulin Resistance
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Stress, Psychological - blood - physiopathology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. To investigate the relationship between gonadal function, insulin and psychosocial stress in middle-aged men. DESIGN. A population-based, cross-sectional, observational study. SETTING. Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS. Four hundred and thirty-nine males, all aged 51 years. MAIN VARIABLES. Body-mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), insulin, C-peptide, free testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), lipids, fibrinogen, lung function tests (FVC, FEV1, PEF), blood pressure, a self-administered questionnaire with questions on psychosocial variables, lifestyle and self-rated health. RESULTS. Free testosterone correlated inversely (P
PubMed ID
7738488 View in PubMed
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Age as a determinant for dissemination of seasonal and pandemic influenza: an open cohort study of influenza outbreaks in Östergötland County, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126516
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Toomas Timpka
Olle Eriksson
Armin Spreco
Elin A Gursky
Magnus Strömgren
Einar Holm
Joakim Ekberg
Orjan Dahlström
Lars Valter
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Östergötland County Council, Linköping, Sweden. toomas.timpka@liu.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e31746
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
An understanding of the occurrence and comparative timing of influenza infections in different age groups is important for developing community response and disease control measures. This study uses data from a Scandinavian county (population 427.000) to investigate whether age was a determinant for being diagnosed with influenza 2005-2010 and to examine if age was associated with case timing during outbreaks. Aggregated demographic data were collected from Statistics Sweden, while influenza case data were collected from a county-wide electronic health record system. A logistic regression analysis was used to explore whether case risk was associated with age and outbreak. An analysis of variance was used to explore whether day for diagnosis was also associated to age and outbreak. The clinical case data were validated against case data from microbiological laboratories during one control year. The proportion of cases from the age groups 10-19 (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22384066 View in PubMed
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Age, education and dementia related deaths. The Norwegian Counties Study and The Cohort of Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263219
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2014 Oct 15;345(1-2):75-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2014
Author
Bjørn Heine Strand
Ellen Melbye Langballe
Tor A Rosness
Astrid Liv Mina Bergem
Knut Engedal
Per Nafstad
Grethe S Tell
Heidi Ormstad
Kristian Tambs
Espen Bjertness
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2014 Oct 15;345(1-2):75-82
Date
Oct-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Death
Dementia - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
An inverse relationship between educational level and dementia has been reported in several studies. In this study we investigated the relationship between educational level and dementia related deaths for cohorts of people all born during 1915-39. The cohorts were followed up from adulthood or old age, taking into account possible confounders and mediating paths. Our study population comprised participants in Norwegian health examination studies in the period 1974-2002; The Counties Study and Cohort of Norway (CONOR). Dementia related deaths were defined as deaths with a dementia diagnosis on the death certificate and linked using the Cause of Death Registry to year 2012. The study included 90,843 participants, 2.06 million person years and 2440 dementia related deaths. Cox regression was used to assess the association between education and dementia related deaths. Both high and middle educational levels were associated with lower dementia related death risk compared to those with low education when follow-up started in adulthood (35-49 years, high versus low education: HR=0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.93; 50-69 years, high versus low education: HR=0.52, 95% CI 0.34-0.80). However, when follow-up started at old age (70-80 years) there was no significant association between education and dementia related death. Restricting the study population to those born during a five-year period 1925-29 (the birth cohort overlapping all three age groups), gave similar main findings. The protective effects found for both high and middle educational level compared to low education were robust to adjustment for cardiovascular health and life style factors, suggesting education to be a protective factor for dementia related death. Both high and middle educational levels were associated with decreased dementia related death risk compared with low educational level when follow-up started in adulthood, but no association was observed when follow-up started at old age.
PubMed ID
25034053 View in PubMed
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Airflow limitation and changes in pulmonary function among bleachery workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174038
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A J Mehta
P K Henneberger
K. Torén
A-C Olin
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Airway Resistance
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine Compounds - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Industry
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oxides - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Paper
Probability
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Spirometry - methods
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether chronic airflow limitation and rapid decline in pulmonary function were associated with peak exposures to ozone and other irritant gases in pulp mills. Bleachery workers potentially exposed to irritant gassings (n = 178) from three Swedish pulp mills, and a comparison group of workers not exposed to irritant gassings (n = 54) from two paper mills, were studied. Baseline surveys occurred in 1995-1996, with follow-up surveys in 1998-1999. Participants performed spirometry and answered questions regarding ozone, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gassings. From regression models controlling for potential confounders, declines in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-24 mL x yr(-1)) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) (-19 mL x yr(-1)) were associated with ClO2/SO2 gassings. At follow-up, the prevalence of chronic airflow limitation (i.e. FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal) was elevated for participants with only pre-baseline ozone gassings and with both pre-baseline and interval ozone gassings, after controlling for potential confounders. These findings suggest that obstructive effects among bleachery workers are associated with ozone gassings, and that adverse effects on spirometry might also accompany chlorine dioxide/sulphur dioxide gassings. Peak exposures to irritant gases in pulp mills should be prevented.
PubMed ID
15994400 View in PubMed
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578 records – page 1 of 58.