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The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
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Academic success across the transition from primary to secondary schooling among lower-income adolescents: understanding the effects of family resources and gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108330
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Lisa A Serbin
Dale M Stack
Danielle Kingdon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Centre for Research in Human Development, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West PY-170, Montreal, QC, H4B 1R6, Canada. Lisa.Serbin@Concordia.CA
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Educational Measurement
Family
Female
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Psychological
Models, Statistical
Parent-Child Relations
Poverty
Prospective Studies
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Schools
Sex Factors
Abstract
Successful academic performance during adolescence is a key predictor of lifetime achievement, including occupational and social success. The present study investigated the important transition from primary to secondary schooling during early adolescence, when academic performance among youth often declines. The goal of the study was to understand how risk factors, specifically lower family resources and male gender, threaten academic success following this "critical transition" in schooling. The study involved a longitudinal examination of the predictors of academic performance in grades 7-8 among 127 (56 % girls) French-speaking Quebec (Canada) adolescents from lower-income backgrounds. As hypothesized based on transition theory, hierarchical regression analyses showed that supportive parenting and specific academic, social and behavioral competencies (including spelling ability, social skills, and lower levels of attention problems) predicted success across this transition among at-risk youth. Multiple-mediation procedures demonstrated that the set of compensatory factors fully mediated the negative impact of lower family resources on academic success in grades 7-8. Unique mediators (social skills, spelling ability, supportive parenting) also were identified. In addition, the "gender gap" in performance across the transition could be attributed statistically to differences between boys and girls in specific competencies observed prior to the transition, as well as differential parenting (i.e., support from mother) towards girls and boys. The present results contribute to our understanding of the processes by which established risk factors, such as low family income and gender impact development and academic performance during early adolescence. These "transitional" processes and subsequent academic performance may have consequences across adolescence and beyond, with an impact on lifetime patterns of achievement and occupational success.
PubMed ID
23904002 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of two dental and one skeletal age estimation method in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35120
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1995 Oct 30;75(2-3):225-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
L. Kullman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Oral Radiology and Forensic Odontology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 1995 Oct 30;75(2-3):225-36
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Determination by Skeleton - methods
Age Determination by Teeth - methods
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Molar - radiography
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The paper concerns the accuracy of two dental methods of age estimation based on the radiographic appearance of the root of the lower third molar. The first dental method tested was traditional with a subjective assessment of the root development stage and the second was a new method with a metric measurement of formed root length. Since previous studies have shown a relatively low precision for dentally based age estimation methods during adolescence, an additional independent indicator of chronological age was employed, namely skeletal maturity according to the atlas and method of Greulich and Pyle (Radiographic Atlas of Skeletal Development of the Hand and Wrist Stanford University Press, CA, 1959). The material was Swedish adolescents aged 12-19 years. It was found that all methods gave an overestimation of chronological age, with the highest overestimation, more than 1 year, for the two dental methods. A stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that skeletal age alone explains 48% of the variation in estimated chronological age. It may be concluded that the accuracy of age estimations based on the lower third molars is quite uncertain during adolescence. Up to 18 years, it is preferable to use skeletal age alone as a predictor. Only a small increase in the explanation coefficient of age variation (3-4%) could be seen if digitized or subjectively estimated root lengths were added as predictors to the skeletal estimation.
PubMed ID
8586347 View in PubMed
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Active and uncontrolled asthma among children exposed to air stack emissions of sulphur dioxide from petroleum refineries in Montreal, Quebec: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124918
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leylâ Deger
Céline Plante
Louis Jacques
Sophie Goudreau
Stéphane Perron
John Hicks
Tom Kosatsky
Audrey Smargiassi
Author Affiliation
Direction de santé publique de l' Agence de las sante services sociaux de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Respir J. 2012 Mar-Apr;19(2):97-102
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - chemically induced - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Infant
Male
Petroleum Pollution - adverse effects
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Little attention has been devoted to the effects on children's respiratory health of exposure to sulphur dioxide (SO2) in ambient air from local industrial emissions. Most studies on the effects of SO(2) have assessed its impact as part of the regional ambient air pollutant mix.
To examine the association between exposure to stack emissions of SO(2) from petroleum refineries located in Montreal's (Quebec) east-end industrial complex and the prevalence of active asthma and poor asthma control among children living nearby.
The present cross-sectional study used data from a respiratory health survey of Montreal children six months to 12 years of age conducted in 2006. Of 7964 eligible households that completed the survey, 842 children between six months and 12 years of age lived in an area impacted by refinery emissions. Ambient SO(2) exposure levels were estimated using dispersion modelling. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% CIs for the association between yearly school and residential SO(2) exposure estimates and asthma outcomes. Adjustments were made for child's age, sex, parental history of atopy and tobacco smoke exposure at home.
The adjusted PR for the association between active asthma and SO(2) levels was 1.14 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.39) per interquartile range increase in modelled annual SO(2). The effect on poor asthma control was greater (PR=1.39 per interquartile range increase in modelled SO(2) [95% CI 1.00 to 1.94]).
Results of the present study suggest a relationship between exposure to refinery stack emissions of SO(2) and the prevalence of active and poor asthma control in children who live and attend school in proximity to refineries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22536578 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Acute illnesses in children. A description and analysis of parents' perception of illness threat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35879
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Mar;12(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
B W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Department of General Practice, Odense.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Mar;12(1):15-9
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Parents - psychology
Perception
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sampling Studies
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--To identify families in which the parents reported the child's illness as particularly stressful (high perception of illness threat), and to find out which health problems the parents perceive as particularly threatening. DESIGN--The parents registered the diagnosis and perception of illness threat in relation to the child's latest illness within a four-week retrospective period. Selected psychosocial conditions of the families were recorded in the same questionnaire. SETTING--18,949 families with at least one child under the age of 8 years, resident in the County of Ringkøbing in western Denmark at 1 March 1988. SUBJECTS--An age-stratified random sample of 1982 families was entered in the study. 85% of the families returned the questionnaire. RESULTS--There was a considerable variation in the parents' perception of illness threat. On the basis of a score it was possible to group parents with a high, medium, and low perception of illness threat. Every fourth family reported a high perception of illness threat. A multivariate analysis, with a high perception of illness threat as dependent and selected psychosocial conditions and the diagnosis as independent variables, led to the following main results: 1) parents with a high perception of the general health threat ("worried" parents) most frequently reported a high perception of illness threat, 2) the diagnoses were decisive; in particular, inflammation in the middle ear, bronchitis, pneumonia, and accidents led to the parents' reporting a high perception of illness threat, 3) parents without experience of children and children's illnesses more frequently perceived an actual illness as a high illness threat than parents with this experience, 4) parents more frequently perceive an illness in girls as a high illness threat. CONCLUSIONS--"Worried" parents, without experience of children and children's illnesses, perceive the child's latest illness as a high illness threat. These families need special care.
PubMed ID
8009094 View in PubMed
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Acute illnesses in children. A description and analysis of the cumulative incidence proportion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36143
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Sep;11(3):202-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
B W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Health, Department of General Practice, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1993 Sep;11(3):202-6
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Models, Statistical
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Conditions
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--To describe parent-reported morbidity in relation to the psycho-social conditions of the families and to characterize families whose children are frequently ill. DESIGN--The parent-reported morbidity in a two-month prospective period, and the psychosocial conditions of the families were registered by means of a questionnaire. The conditioned probability of parents' reporting an episode of illness was estimated by means of logistic regression analysis, taking the psycho-social conditions into consideration. SETTING--18,949 families with at least one child under the age of 8 years, resident in the County of Ringkjøbing in western Denmark at 1 March 1988. SUBJECTS--An age-stratified random sample of 1982 families was entered in the study. 1588 (82%) families returned the questionnaire. RESULTS--The parents reported considerable morbidity in their children. The cumulative incidence proportion (CIP) for the period was 48%. The multivariate analysis of the parent-reported morbidity led to the following main results: 1) the morbidity was greatest for children aged 6 to 18 months, after which it decreased with age, 2) there was interaction between the care conditions and the child's age--CIP for children up to two years was largest for the children who were cared for in daycare, while the CIP for the older children was largest for the children who were cared for at home, 3) if the parents reported that the child's siblings suffered from chronic or frequently recurring morbidity, the child's morbidity rate was significantly increased, 4) mothers with higher education reported more morbidity in their children than mothers without this education, and 5) parents with a high perception of the general health threat ("worried" parents) reported more morbidity than did parents with a low perception. CONCLUSIONS--The results made it possible to characterize families whose children were frequently reported ill.
PubMed ID
8272653 View in PubMed
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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Adiposity, aerobic fitness, muscle fitness, and markers of inflammation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119134
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Elin Kolle
Lars Bo Andersen
Sigmund A Anderssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sports, Faculty of Teacher Education and Sports, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Sogndal, Norway. jostsj@hisf.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Apr;45(4):714-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - physiology
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Inflammation - blood - diagnosis
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Muscle Strength - physiology
Norway
Physical Fitness - physiology
Regression Analysis
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe levels of inflammation markers in Norwegian children and to examine the associations of adiposity, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness with markers of inflammation.
In 2005-2006, 1467 nine-year-olds were randomly selected from all regions in Norway. The participation rate was 89%. The inflammatory markers evaluated included C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-a, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, and interleukin-6. We assessed muscular strength by measuring explosive, isometric, and endurance strength. Aerobic fitness was measured directly during a maximal cycle ergometer test. Adiposity was expressed as waist circumference (WC).
The girls had significantly higher levels of CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin and lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-a compared with the boys. We observed a graded association of CRP and leptin levels across quintiles of WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness (P = 0.001 for all participants). The regression analyses revealed that WC, aerobic fitness, and muscle fitness were independently associated with the CRP (WC ß = 0.158, P
PubMed ID
23135365 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of parental employment and parenting: connections to adolescents' well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179988
Source
J Adolesc. 2004 Jun;27(3):221-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Marjukka Sallinen
Ulla Kinnunen
Anna Rönkä
Author Affiliation
Family Research Unit, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box. 35, Agora 40014, Finland. marjukka.sallinen@psyka.jyu.fi
Source
J Adolesc. 2004 Jun;27(3):221-37
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Depression - psychology
Educational Status
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Perception
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
This paper examines whether the relationship between parental work and adolescents' well-being would be mediated through parenting behaviour. The primary focus was on the experiences of adolescents. Questionnaire-based data from families (both parents and one children, n = 77) and adolescents (n = 126) were collected in Finland in 2000 and 2001, respectively. The adolescents were on average 14 years old. Results showed that the relationships between parents' negative work experiences and adolescents' depression (all perceived by adolescents) were partially mediated by adolescents' experience of lessened autonomy granting in parenting and increased conflicts between parents and adolescents. In addition, the relations between fathers' negative work experiences and adolescents' negative attitude regarding school (all reported by adolescents) were mediated by adolescents' perceptions of increased conflicts between fathers and adolescents.
PubMed ID
15159085 View in PubMed
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603 records – page 1 of 61.