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Acute health effects common during graffiti removal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50823
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S. Langworth
H. Anundi
L. Friis
G. Johanson
M L Lind
E. Söderman
B A Akesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Occupational Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden. sven.langworth@pharmacia.com
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2001 Apr;74(3):213-8
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Data Collection - methods
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Irritants - adverse effects - analysis
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solvents - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify possible health effects caused by different cleaning agents used in graffiti removal. METHODS: In 38 graffiti removers working 8-h shifts in the Stockholm underground system, the exposure to organic solvents was assessed by active air sampling, biological monitoring, and by interviews and a questionnaire. Health effects were registered, by physical examinations, porta7ble spirometers and self-administered questionnaires. The prevalence of symptoms was compared with 49 controls working at the underground depots, and with 177 population controls. RESULTS: The 8-h time-weighted average exposures (TWA) were low, below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents. The short-term exposures occasionally exceeded the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL), especially during work in poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators. The graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of tiredness and upper airway symptoms compared with the depot controls, and significantly more tiredness, headaches and symptoms affecting airways, eyes and skin than the population controls. Among the graffiti removers, some of the symptoms increased during the working day. On a group basis, the lung function registrations showed normal values. However, seven workers displayed a clear reduction of peak expiratory flow (PEF) over the working shift. CONCLUSIONS: Though their average exposure to organic solvents was low, the graffiti removers reported significantly higher prevalence of unspecific symptoms such as fatigue and headache as well as irritative symptoms from the eyes and respiratory tract, compared with the controls. To prevent adverse health effects it is important to inform the workers about the health risks, and to restrict use of the most hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, it is important to develop good working practices and to encourage the use of personal protective equipment.
PubMed ID
11355296 View in PubMed
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Adjustment for misclassification in studies of familial aggregation of disease using routine register data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187750
Source
Stat Med. 2002 Dec 15;21(23):3595-607
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2002
Author
Elisabeth Wreford Andersen
Per Kragh Andersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. eo@biostat.ku.dk
Source
Stat Med. 2002 Dec 15;21(23):3595-607
Date
Dec-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bias (epidemiology)
Case-Control Studies
Cluster analysis
Computer simulation
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Mothers
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - classification - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper discusses the misclassification that occurs when relying solely on routine register data in family studies of disease clustering. A register study of familial aggregation of schizophrenia is used as an example. The familial aggregation is studied using a regression model for the disease in the child including the disease status of the parents as a risk factor. If all the information is found in the routine registers then the disease status of the parents is only known from the time when the register started and if this information is used unquestioningly the parents who have had the disease before this time are misclassified as disease-free. Two methods are presented to adjust for this misclassification: regression calibration and an EM-type algorithm. These methods are used in the schizophrenia example where the large effect of having a schizophrenic mother hardly shows any signs of bias due to misclassification. The methods are also studied in simulations showing that the misclassification problem increases with the disease frequency.
PubMed ID
12436458 View in PubMed
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Adolescent turning points: the association between meaning-making and psychological well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129295
Source
Dev Psychol. 2012 Jul;48(4):1058-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Royette Tavernier
Teena Willoughby
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, L2S 3A1. rt09la@brocku.ca
Source
Dev Psychol. 2012 Jul;48(4):1058-68
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Concept Formation
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Research findings indicate that the ability to create meaning out of turning points (i.e., significant life experiences) is related to psychological well-being. It is not clear, however, whether individuals who report meaning-making and higher well-being are better adjusted prior to the experience of their turning point event. This study examined whether meaning-making and timing of turning points would be associated with higher scores on well-being. Participants were 418 Grade 12 students (209 of whom reported having had a turning point event and a matched group of 209 adolescents who did not report having had a turning point event). This subset of participants was taken from a larger longitudinal study of 803 (52% female) Grade 12 Canadian students (M age = 17 years). All participants completed well-being measures 3 years prior, when they were in Grade 9. Meaning-making was significantly associated with higher psychological well-being, controlling for Grade 9 scores on well-being. Importantly, adolescents who reported meaning-making in Grade 12 did not differ on well-being prior to the experience of their turning point event, when they were in Grade 9, from adolescents who did not report meaning-making. These findings highlight the importance of examining meaning-making in relation to positive adjustment among adolescents reporting a significant life-changing event. Limitations regarding the use of survey measures and the generalizability of the results to a culturally diverse group of adolescents are discussed.
PubMed ID
22122472 View in PubMed
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Adrenal steroid dysregulation in dystrophia myotonica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201897
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Apr;245(4):345-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
A. Johansson
A. Henriksson
B O Olofsson
T. Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1999 Apr;245(4):345-51
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-alpha-Hydroxyprogesterone - blood
Adult
Androstenedione - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Circadian Rhythm
Cognition
Dehydroepiandrosterone - blood
Humans
Hydrocortisone - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Myotonic Dystrophy - blood - psychology
Regression Analysis
Saliva - metabolism
Abstract
To evaluate circulating adrenal steroid hormones, cortisol diurnal rhythm and the negative feedback function of the cortisol axis in patients with dystrophia myotonica (DyM), a disease where metabolic disturbances, peripheral insulin insensitivity and cognitive dysfunction are common features.
Morning serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, 17 alpha-hydroxy progesterone and cortisol; morning serum levels of testosterone and insulin; diurnal rhythm of saliva cortisol; and an overnight dexamethasone suppression test, together with a cognitive screening test in men with DyM and in controls.
Outpatient clinic in co-operation with Umeå University Hospital.
Fifteen men with DyM and 13 age-matched controls.
Adrenal steroid hormone levels, diurnal rhythm of saliva cortisol, dexamethasone suppression test and Mini Mental State Examination scores.
Morning serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione and 17 alpha-hydroxy progesterone were significantly decreased in DyM after inclusion of age and body mass index in multiple regression analyses (48, 26 and 32% decreases, respectively). An abnormal diurnal rhythm of saliva cortisol was present in all patients, mean saliva cortisol levels being significantly increased (33%) in DyM patients. Dexamethasone suppressibility did not differ between groups. DyM patients scored significantly lower on the Mini Mental State Examination (P
PubMed ID
10356596 View in PubMed
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Airflow limitation and changes in pulmonary function among bleachery workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174038
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
A J Mehta
P K Henneberger
K. Torén
A-C Olin
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2005 Jul;26(1):133-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Airway Resistance
Case-Control Studies
Chlorine Compounds - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Industry
Lung Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oxides - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Paper
Probability
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Spirometry - methods
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated whether chronic airflow limitation and rapid decline in pulmonary function were associated with peak exposures to ozone and other irritant gases in pulp mills. Bleachery workers potentially exposed to irritant gassings (n = 178) from three Swedish pulp mills, and a comparison group of workers not exposed to irritant gassings (n = 54) from two paper mills, were studied. Baseline surveys occurred in 1995-1996, with follow-up surveys in 1998-1999. Participants performed spirometry and answered questions regarding ozone, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gassings. From regression models controlling for potential confounders, declines in both the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-24 mL x yr(-1)) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) (-19 mL x yr(-1)) were associated with ClO2/SO2 gassings. At follow-up, the prevalence of chronic airflow limitation (i.e. FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal) was elevated for participants with only pre-baseline ozone gassings and with both pre-baseline and interval ozone gassings, after controlling for potential confounders. These findings suggest that obstructive effects among bleachery workers are associated with ozone gassings, and that adverse effects on spirometry might also accompany chlorine dioxide/sulphur dioxide gassings. Peak exposures to irritant gases in pulp mills should be prevented.
PubMed ID
15994400 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake: a risk factor for psoriasis in young and middle aged men?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12202
Source
BMJ. 1990 Mar 24;300(6727):780-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-1990
Author
K. Poikolainen
T. Reunala
J. Karvonen
J. Lauharanta
P. Kärkkäinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1990 Mar 24;300(6727):780-3
Date
Mar-24-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - physiology
Alcoholic Intoxication - complications
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Case-Control Studies
Coffee - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psoriasis - enzymology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To clarify the nature of the association between alcohol intake and psoriasis. DESIGN--Case-control study of men aged 19-50 with onset of skin disease in 1976 or later. SETTING--Outpatient clinics of the departments of dermatology of the university central hospitals in Helsinki, Oulu, and Tampere from September 1987 to April 1989. SUBJECTS--144 Patients with psoriasis and 285 unmatched controls with other skin diseases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of clinical examination and self administered questionnaire assessing lifestyle and alcohol intake during two specified periods--namely, 12 months before the onset of skin disease and 12 months before the date of examination. RESULTS--Recalled mean alcohol intake before the onset of skin diseases was 42.9 g/day among the patients with psoriasis and 21.0 g/day among the controls. In logistic regression analysis psoriasis was associated with alcohol intake but not with coffee consumption, smoking, age, marital state, or social group. The odds ratio for psoriasis at an alcohol intake of 100 g/day compared with no intake was 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 3.9). The controls decreased their alcohol intake after the onset of the disease but the group with psoriasis did not. Analysis of serum enzyme values showed that gamma-glutamyltransferase activity was significantly correlated with alcohol intake (r = 0.35), the mean activity being 75.0 U/l among patients with psoriasis and 41.9 U/l among controls. CONCLUSIONS--Alcohol is a risk factor for psoriasis in young and middle aged men, and psoriasis may sustain drinking.
PubMed ID
1969757 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorders in schizophrenia: a national cohort study of 12,653 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133164
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;72(6):775-9; quiz 878-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Roland M Jones
Paul Lichtenstein
Martin Grann
Niklas Långström
Seena Fazel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. jonesrm6@cf.ac.uk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;72(6):775-9; quiz 878-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcoholism - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Marital status
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Comorbid alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in schizophrenia are associated with increased morbidity, more inpatient treatment, and violent offending. It is of clinical importance to identify those with schizophrenia who may go on to develop an alcohol use disorder; however, the risk factors are not well understood. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for the development of an AUD in patients after they had been diagnosed with schizophrenia.
We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 12,653 individuals diagnosed with ICD-defined schizophrenia in Sweden in 1973-2004, using data from national registers. We tested the associations between individual factors (marital status, immigrant status, and previous violent offending), sociodemographic factors (income and education), and parental risk factors (AUDs, psychosis, and violent offending) ICD-defined and AUD development using logistic regression modeling.
Over a median follow-up of 17.3 years, 7.6% of patients had at least 1 hospital diagnosis of AUD. After adjustment for gender and age at diagnosis in a multivariate regression model, previous violent offending (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.8-2.5), low education (OR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5), maternal AUD (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.7), and paternal AUD (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.5-2.3) remained independently associated with increased risk of patient AUD.
AUDs are a common sequela of schizophrenia. Risk factors that could be identified at the time of first presentation include low educational attainment, previous violent offending, and parental history of AUDs and may inform clinical treatment and follow-up of those most at risk.
PubMed ID
21733478 View in PubMed
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ALOX5AP gene and the PDE4D gene in a central European population of stroke patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176042
Source
Stroke. 2005 Apr;36(4):731-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Elin Lõhmussaar
Andreas Gschwendtner
Jakob C Mueller
Tõnis Org
Erich Wichmann
Gerhard Hamann
Thomas Meitinger
Martin Dichgans
Author Affiliation
Institutes of Human Genetics, GSF-National Research Institute for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
Source
Stroke. 2005 Apr;36(4):731-6
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3',5'-Cyclic-AMP Phosphodiesterases - genetics
5-Lipoxygenase-Activating Proteins
Aged
Alleles
Carrier Proteins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 3
Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases, Type 4
Edetic Acid - chemistry
Europe, Eastern
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic markers
Genotype
Haplotypes
Humans
Iceland
Ischemia
Linkage Disequilibrium
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Microsatellite Repeats
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Regression Analysis
Risk
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stroke - genetics
Abstract
Recent evidence has implicated the genes for 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (ALOX5AP) and phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) as susceptibility genes for stroke in the Icelandic population. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of these genes in a central European population of stroke patients.
A total of 639 consecutive stroke patients and 736 unrelated population-based controls that had been matched for age and sex were examined using a case-control design. Twenty-two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering ALOX5AP were genotyped. For PDE4D, microsatellite AC008818-1 and 12 SNPs, which tag all common haplotypes in previously identified linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks, were analyzed.
A nominally significant association with stroke was observed with several SNPs from ALOX5AP, including SNP SG13S114, which had been part of the Icelandic at-risk haplotype. Associations were stronger in males than in females, with SG13S114 (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.55; P=0.017) and SG13S100 (odds ratio, 1.26; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54; P=0.024) showing the strongest associations. No significant associations were detected with single markers and haplotypes in PDE4D. The frequencies of single-marker alleles and haplotypes differed largely from those in the Icelandic population.
The present study suggests that sequence variants in the ALOX5AP gene are significantly associated with stroke, particularly in males. Variants in the PDE4D gene are not a major risk factor for stroke in individuals from central Europe. Population differences in allele and haplotype frequencies as well as LD structure may contribute to the observed differences between populations.
PubMed ID
15731479 View in PubMed
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An epidemiologic study of bronchial asthma and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15904
Source
Epidemiology. 1995 Sep;6(5):503-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
U. Flodin
P. Jönsson
J. Ziegler
O. Axelson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiology. 1995 Sep;6(5):503-5
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The role of smoking and air pollution in bronchial asthma in otherwise healthy adults is still unclear. We compared 79 cases of asthma, diagnosed between ages 20 and 65 years, with 304 randomly drawn population controls of similar age from the same catchment area as the cases. The comparison involved questionnaire information on smoking habits, occupational exposures, dwelling conditions, various suspect allergenic exposures, and atopy. Those who had smoked for 3 years or more, present or past, were at increased risk for bronchial asthma (odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3). Adjustment by multiple logistic regression for age and gender as well as atopy and air pollution at work did not change the relative risk estimate. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, or passive smoking, at work involved a slightly greater risk.
PubMed ID
8562626 View in PubMed
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Angiotensinogen mutations and risk for ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Six case-control studies from the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53929
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 15;134(10):941-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2001
Author
A A Sethi
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
M L Grønholdt
R. Steffensen
P. Schnohr
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry 54M1, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 15;134(10):941-54
Date
May-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensinogen - genetics
Brain Ischemia - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Myocardial Infarction - genetics
Myocardial Ischemia - genetics
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The M235T and T174M angiotensinogen mutations have been linked to increased risk for ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether angiotensinogen mutations are associated with ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. DESIGN: Six case-control studies from the Copenhagen City Heart Study. SETTING: Copenhagen, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study and patients from the same hospital with ischemic heart disease (n = 866 and n = 943, respectively), myocardial infarction (n = 519 and n = 493, respectively), or ischemic cerebrovascular disease (n = 489 and n = 434, respectively) and 7975 controls without these conditions. MEASUREMENTS: Genotypes for the M235T and T174M angiotensinogen mutations were compared between controls and Copenhagen City Heart Study participants with ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease (studies 1a, 1b, and 1c) and patients from Copenhagen University Hospital with the same conditions (studies 2a, 2b, and 2c). RESULTS: Relative allele frequencies of 235T and 174M in the general population were 0.41 and 0.12, respectively. Genotype was not associated with increased risk for ischemic heart or ischemic cerebrovascular disease in studies of either mutation alone or combined in women or men. Among compound heterozygotes (235MT /174TM ), women in case-control study 2a had decreased risk for ischemic heart disease in age-adjusted analysis; however, this decreased risk was not seen in multifactorial-adjusted or matched analyses, in men, or in case-control study 1a. Among double homozygotes (235TT /174MM ), women in case-control study 2b had increased risk for myocardial infarction in matched analysis; however, this increased risk was not seen in age- or multifactorial-adjusted analyses, in men, or in case-control study 1b. Among single homozygotes (235TT /174TT ), men in case-control study 2b had increased risk for myocardial infarction in multifactorial-adjusted and matched analyses. This risk was not present in age-adjusted analysis, in women, or in case-control study 1b. In addition, male single homozygotes had decreased risk for ischemic cerebrovascular disease in case-control study 2c in age- and multifactorial-adjusted analyses, but this finding was not seen in matched analysis, in women, or in case-control study 1c. CONCLUSIONS: In six large case-control studies, the M235T and T174M angiotensinogen mutations were not consistently associated with increased (or decreased) risk for ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, or ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Statistically significant associations may represent chance findings rather than real phenomena.
PubMed ID
11352695 View in PubMed
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258 records – page 1 of 26.