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183 records – page 1 of 19.

Acculturation status and hypertension among Asian immigrants in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190204
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2002 Jun;56(6):455-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002

Affective and cognitive correlates of gambling behavior in university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139012
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Sep;27(3):401-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Antonio Pascual-Leone
Kevin Gomes
Emily S Orr
Kristen A Kaploun
Christopher A Abeare
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4, Canada. apl@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Gambl Stud. 2011 Sep;27(3):401-8
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cognition
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Gambling - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Motivation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk-Taking
Self Concept
Social Environment
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the following study was to explore certain affective and cognitive components and their relationships to gambling behavior in an undergraduate population. Specifically, the aim was to predict gambling severity using depression scores on the BDI-II, the dependency and self-criticism subscales on the DEQ, emotional awareness scores on the LEAS, cognitive flexibility scores from the STROOP, and a creativity subtests from the TTCT. Participants were 200 undergraduate students and 3.5-7.5% of individuals reported some level of problematic gambling behavior. Multiple regression analysis indicated that self-criticism and creative originality were significant predictors of gambling behavior, explaining 7.6% of the variance. Further analyses reveal a non-linear trend in the creative originality of those who gamble; only the at-risk gamblers were high in creativity whereas abstainers and problematic gamblers display similarly lower levels of creativity. Results are discussed in regards to Blaszczynski and Nower's Addiction 97:487-499 (2002) subtypes of gambling vulnerability.
PubMed ID
21113732 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia and health behaviors in healthy male volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199587
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1999 Dec;47(6):635-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
K F Helmers
A. Mente
Author Affiliation
Graduate Department of Kinesiology and Health Science, Bethune College, York University, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 1999 Dec;47(6):635-45
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sampling Studies
Sexual Behavior
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
The association between alexithymia and maladaptive health behaviors was evaluated in 118 young, healthy men, aged 18-45 years. Subjects completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26), and a health behaviors questionnaire, measuring alcohol and drug use, sedentary lifestyle, poor nutritional consumption, and risky sexual practices. In forced hierarchical regression analyses, the association between alexithymia and health behaviors was evaluated after adjusting for age, body mass index, social support, ambivalence over expression of emotion, and the expression of emotion. Results indicated that: (1) the TAS-26 and difficulty identifying feelings was associated with poor nutritional consumption; (2) difficulty identifying feelings was associated with greater alcohol and drug use; and (3) difficulty communicating feelings was associated with a more sedentary lifestyle. There was no association between risky sexual practices and alexithymia. These results suggest that, in young men, difficulties with identifying emotions and communicating emotions are associated with maladaptive nutritional habits, a sedentary lifestyle, and substance abuse, even after adjusting for other psychosocial and demographic variables. Such maladaptive health behaviors may help explain the association between alexithymia and premature mortality.
PubMed ID
10661609 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia as a mediator between childhood trauma and self-injurious behaviors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180738
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Mar;28(3):339-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Sandra C Paivio
Chantal R McCulloch
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ont., Canada N9B 3P4.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Mar;28(3):339-54
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Self-Assessment
Self-Injurious Behavior - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test whether alexithymia mediates the relationship between childhood maltreatment and self-injurious behaviors (SIB) in college women.
The sample was comprised of 100 female undergraduate students. Measures were the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire [D. Bernstein, L. Fink, Manual for the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, The Psychological Corporation, New York, 1998], the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 [Journal of Psychosomatic Research 38 (1994) 23; Journal of Psychosomatic Research 38 (1994) 33], and the Self-Injurious Behaviors Questionnaire which assessed the lifetime frequency of six methods of superficial self-injury (hair pulling, head banging, punching, scratching, cutting, and burning). Regression analyses were used to test the proposed mediational model.
Forty-one percent of respondents reported having engaged in SIB; most engaged in multiple methods, and self-cutting was the most frequently endorsed method. Results of regression analyses supported the proposed mediational model for all types of maltreatment except sexual abuse. Sexual abuse, considered alone, was not significantly associated with alexithymia which precluded testing for mediational effects.
Results support a link between a history of childhood maltreatment and SIB among college women and the hypothesis that alexithymia mediates this relationship.
PubMed ID
15066350 View in PubMed
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Association between ambient carbon monoxide levels and hospitalizations for congestive heart failure in the elderly in 10 Canadian cities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209090
Source
Epidemiology. 1997 Mar;8(2):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
R T Burnett
R E Dales
J R Brook
M E Raizenne
D. Krewski
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Epidemiology. 1997 Mar;8(2):162-7
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects - analysis
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Health Care Surveys
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Male
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Abstract
We examined the role that ambient air pollution plays in exacerbating cardiac disease by relating daily fluctuations in admissions to 134 hospitals for congestive heart failure in the elderly to daily variations in ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone, and the coefficient of haze in Canada's 10 largest cities for the 11-year period 1981-1991 inclusive. We adjusted the hospitalization time series for seasonal, subseasonal, and weekly cycles and for hospital usage patterns. The logarithm of the daily high-hour ambient carbon monoxide concentration recorded on the day of admission displayed the strongest and most consistent association with hospitalization rates among the pollutants, after stratifying the time series by month of year and adjusting simultaneously for temperature, dew point, and the other ambient air pollutants. The relative risk for a change from 1 ppm to 3 ppm, the 25th and 75th percentiles of the exposure distribution, was 1.065 (95% confidence interval = 1.028-1.104). The regression coefficients of the other air pollutants were much more sensitive to simultaneous adjustment for either multiple pollutant or weather model specifications.
PubMed ID
9229208 View in PubMed
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Association between corticosteroids and infection, sepsis, and infectious death in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML): results from the Canadian infections in AML research group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120927
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Dec;55(12):1608-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
David Dix
Sonia Cellot
Victoria Price
Biljana Gillmeister
Marie-Chantal Ethier
Donna L Johnston
Victor Lewis
Bruno Michon
David Mitchell
Kent Stobart
Rochelle Yanofsky
Carol Portwine
Mariana Silva
Lynette Bowes
Shayna Zelcer
Josée Brossard
Jeffrey Traubici
Upton Allen
Joseph Beyene
Lillian Sung
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Dec;55(12):1608-14
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications - epidemiology
Bacterial Infections - complications - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Graft vs Host Disease - drug therapy - prevention & control
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute - epidemiology - microbiology - surgery - therapy
Male
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Infection continues to be a major problem for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Objectives were to identify factors associated with infection, sepsis, and infectious deaths in children with newly diagnosed AML.
We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study that included children = 18 years of age with de novo, non-M3 AML diagnosed between January 1995 and December 2004, treated at 15 Canadian centers. Patients were monitored for infection from initiation of AML treatment until recovery from the last cycle of chemotherapy, conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relapse, persistent disease, or death (whichever occurred first). Consistent trained research associates abstracted all information from each site.
341 patients were included. Median age was 7.1 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2.0-13.5) and 29 (8.5%) had Down syndrome. In sum, 26 (7.6%) experienced death as a first event. There were 1277 courses of chemotherapy administered in which sterile site microbiologically documented infection occurred in 313 courses (24.5%). Sepsis and infectious death occurred in 97 (7.6%) and 16 (1.3%) courses, respectively. The median days of corticosteroid administration was 2 per course (IQR, 0-6). In multiple regression analysis, duration of corticosteroid exposure was significantly associated with more microbiologically documented sterile site infection, bacteremia, fungal infection, and sepsis. The only factor significantly associated with infectious death was days of corticosteroid exposure (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.08; P = .001).
In pediatric AML, infection, sepsis, and infectious death were associated with duration of corticosteroid exposure. Corticosteroids should be avoided when possible for this population.
PubMed ID
22955431 View in PubMed
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The association between depression and epilepsy in a nationally representative sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152860
Source
Epilepsia. 2009 May;50(5):1051-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Esme Fuller-Thomson
Sarah Brennenstuhl
Author Affiliation
Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work & Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. esme.fuller.thomson@utoronto.ca
Source
Epilepsia. 2009 May;50(5):1051-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Epilepsy - complications - epidemiology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To determine the: (1) national prevalence of epilepsy and depression; (2) prevalence of depression among those with epilepsy; (3) odds ratio of depression among those with epilepsy compared to those without, controlling for demographic characteristics; (4) demographic correlates of depression among those with epilepsy and those without; and, (5) health services utilization of those with epilepsy and depression.
The full sample of the nationally representative 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (n = 130,880) was used to determine prevalence of epilepsy and depression. A subsample of 781 individuals reporting an epilepsy diagnosis and with complete depression data was used to determine prevalence and correlates of depression, and health service utilization patterns. Correlates of depression among those without epilepsy (n = 126,104) were also determined. Chi-square analyses, t-tests, prevalence ratios, and a logistic regression were conducted.
Thirteen percent of those with epilepsy were depressed, in comparison to 7% of those without (p
PubMed ID
19183219 View in PubMed
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Association between perceived security of the neighbourhood and small-for-gestational-age birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155264
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 Sep;22(5):467-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Nathalie Auger
Mark Daniel
Robert W Platt
Yuquan Wu
Zhong-Cheng Luo
Robert Choinière
Author Affiliation
Unité Etudes et Analyses de l'Etat de Santé de la Population, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. nathalie.auger@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2008 Sep;22(5):467-77
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Crime - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Models, Statistical
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Evidence points to an association between a mother's place of residence and her newborn's health, independent of individual characteristics. Neighbourhood constructs such as immigrant density, deprivation and crime have all been separately associated with birth outcomes. Little research has considered the joint influence of variables representing a spectrum of neighbourhood constructs. Subjective vs. objective measures of neighbourhood constructs (e.g. reported vs. perceived crime) are often not considered. We sought to evaluate the relationship between neighbourhood measures of reported crime, neighbourhood perceived security, immigrant density, material/social deprivation, residential stability and the odds of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth in an urban setting in Canada. Neighbourhood was defined as police districts (n = 49). We linked Montreal livebirths 1997-2001 (n = 98 330) to police district crime measures, survey data on perceived security, and 2001 census data. We used multi-level analysis to calculate odds ratios (OR) for neighbourhood effects on SGA birth accounting for individual characteristics. Mothers residing in neighbourhoods with the most favourable perception had a lower odds of SGA birth than neighbourhoods with the least favourable perception [OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77, 0.97]. Mothers in neighbourhoods with lower proportions of immigrants had lower odds of SGA birth relative to neighbourhoods with the highest proportion of immigrants. Reported crime, residential stability and material/social deprivation (accounting for neighbourhood perception) were not associated with SGA birth. Immigrant density and subjective perceptions of neighbourhood security are associated with SGA birth. Public health strategies to improve fetal growth should target neighbourhoods with low perceived security and high immigrant density.
PubMed ID
18782253 View in PubMed
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The association of housing density, isolation and tuberculosis in Canadian First Nations communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6436
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;31(5):940-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Michael Clark
Peter Riben
Earl Nowgesic
Author Affiliation
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Michael_Clark@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;31(5):940-5
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility
Housing - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Population Density
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: First Nations communities in Canada experience disproportionately high levels of overcrowded housing, degree of isolation, and rates of tuberculosis (TB). A study was done to assess the association between housing density, isolation, and the occurrence of TB in First Nations communities. METHODS: Average persons per room (ppr), isolation type, average household income, population, and TB cases (1997-1999) at the community level were entered into a database. Tuberculosis notification rates and 95% CI were calculated for different strata of ppr and isolation. Two multiple logistic regression models were developed to examine the association of ppr, isolation, income, and population with the occurrence of >/=1, or >/=2, TB cases in a community. RESULTS: The rate was 18.9 per 100,000 (95% CI: 13.3-24.6) in communities with an average of 0.4-0.6 ppr, while communities with 1.0-1.2 ppr had a rate of 113.0 per 100,000 (95% CI: 95.4-130.5). An increase of 0.1 ppr in a community was associated with a 40% increase in risk of >/=2 TB cases occurring, while an increase of $10,000 in community household income was associated with 0.25 the risk, and being an isolated community increased risk by 2.5 times. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a significant association between housing density, isolation, income levels, and TB. Overcrowded housing has the potential to increase exposure of susceptible individuals to infectious TB cases, and isolation from health services may increase the likelihood of TB.
PubMed ID
12435764 View in PubMed
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Association of mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders with occupational status and disability in a community sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163899
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2007 May;58(5):659-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Nady el-Guebaly
Shawn Currie
Jeanne Williams
JianLi Wang
Jilian Wang
Cynthia A Beck
Colleen Maxwell
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 2T9. nady.el-guebaly@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2007 May;58(5):659-67
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Disabled Persons
Employment
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
This study examined associations between mood disorders, anxiety disorders, substance dependence or harmful alcohol use, and occupational status and disability in a general population sample.
Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 1.2-Mental Health and Well-Being (CCHS-1.2), a representative cross-sectional survey, were analyzed. The total sample was narrowed to individuals between the ages of 18 and 64 years, the age range most likely to be working.
Of the 27,332 persons surveyed, 946 had a mood disorder only, 831 had an anxiety disorder only, 730 had substance dependence only, and 966 had more than one disorder. Twenty-three percent reported that during the previous week they were not at a job or were permanently unable to work (27% with mood disorder only, 30% with anxiety disorder only, and 20% with substance dependence only, and 34% with more than one disorder). In unadjusted analyses, mood and anxiety disorders were associated with absence from work during the week preceding the interview, whereas substance dependence was not. After adjustment for other variables using logistic regression, an association of substance dependence and work absence emerged. Each category of disorder was strongly associated with a greater likelihood of disability days or days spent in bed for mental health reasons.
On a population level, mood and anxiety disorders and substance dependence were associated both with not working during the week preceding the interview as well as an increase in reported disability or bed days. The strength of association appears to be stronger for mood and anxiety disorders.
Notes
Erratum In: Psychiatr Serv. 2007 Jun;58(6):863Wang, Jilian [corrected to Wang, JianLi]
PubMed ID
17463347 View in PubMed
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183 records – page 1 of 19.