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Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism among hospital nurses: an idiographic-longitudinal analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230791
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989
Author
R D Hackett
P. Bycio
R M Guion
Source
Acad Manage J. 1989 Jun;32(2):424-53
Date
Jun-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Attitude of Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
United States
Abstract
For several months, nurses completed ratings of the degree to which certain events relevant to absence were present during each of their scheduled workdays. The event ratings for days when the nurses decided to be absent were then compared with those for days when the nurses attended. As expected, certain events, such as ill health and tiredness, tended to covary and proved to be consistently related to absenteeism across nurses. Also as expected, some events that were not especially relevant for the nurses as a whole, like having a sick family member or friend and concerns about previous poor attendance, nonetheless emerged as being relevant to the absence behavior of certain individuals. Finally, some events were consistently related to the nurses' expressed desire to be absent but not to actual absences. We discuss these differences from two perspectives, one emphasizing the role of attribution bias and the other, a two-stage process in which such bias has no major role.
PubMed ID
10293533 View in PubMed
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Acute impacts of extreme temperature exposure on emergency room admissions related to mental and behavior disorders in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256377
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiang Wang
Eric Lavigne
Hélène Ouellette-kuntz
Bingshu E Chen
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Environmental Issues Division, Canada; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Canada. Electronic address: wanqus@gmail.com.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2014 Feb;155:154-61
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cities
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Extreme Cold - adverse effects
Extreme Heat - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Nonlinear Dynamics
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extreme ambient temperature on hospital emergency room visits (ER) related to mental and behavioral illnesses in Toronto, Canada.
A time series study was conducted using health and climatic data from 2002 to 2010 in Toronto, Canada. Relative risks (RRs) for increases in emergency room (ER) visits were estimated for specific mental and behavioral diseases (MBD) after exposure to hot and cold temperatures while using the 50th percentile of the daily mean temperature as reference. Poisson regression models using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) were used. We adjusted for the effects of seasonality, humidity, day-of-the-week and outdoor air pollutants.
We found a strong association between MBD ER visits and mean daily temperature at 28?C. The association was strongest within a period of 0-4 days for exposure to hot temperatures. A 29% (RR=1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.53) increase in MBD ER vists was observed over a cumulative period of 7 days after exposure to high ambient temperature (99th percentile vs. 50th percentile). Similar associations were reported for schizophrenia, mood, and neurotic disorers. No significant associations with cold temperatures were reported.
The ecological nature and the fact that only one city was investigated.
Our findings suggest that extreme temperature poses a risk to the health and wellbeing for individuals with mental and behavior illnesses. Patient management and education may need to be improved as extreme temperatures may become more prevalent with climate change.
PubMed ID
24332428 View in PubMed
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Admission hyperglycemia predicts a worse outcome in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153259
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Apr;32(4):617-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Alexandre Y Poppe
Sumit R Majumdar
Thomas Jeerakathil
William Ghali
Alastair M Buchan
Michael D Hill
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. alexander.poppe@albertahealthservices.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Apr;32(4):617-22
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Cerebral Hemorrhage - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stroke - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Admission hyperglycemia has been associated with worse outcomes in ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia (glucose >8.0 mmol/l) in the hyperacute phase would be independently associated with increased mortality, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), and poor functional status at 90 days in stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA).
Using data from the prospective, multicenter Canadian Alteplase for Stroke Effectiveness Study (CASES), the association between admission glucose >8.0 mmol/l and mortality, SICH, and poor functional status at 90 days (modified Rankin Scale >1) was examined. Similar analyses examining glucose as a continuous measure were conducted.
Of 1,098 patients, 296 (27%) had admission hyperglycemia, including 18% of those without diabetes and 70% of those with diabetes. After multivariable logistic regression, admission hyperglycemia was found to be independently associated with increased risk of death (adjusted risk ratio 1.5 [95% CI 1.2-1.9]), SICH (1.69 [0.95-3.00]), and a decreased probability of a favorable outcome at 90 days (0.7 [0.5-0.9]). An incremental risk of death and SICH and unfavorable 90-day outcomes was observed with increasing admission glucose. This observation held true for patients with and without diabetes.
In this cohort of IV-tPA-treated stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia was independently associated with increased risk of death, SICH, and poor functional status at 90 days. Treatment trials continue to be urgently needed to determine whether this is a modifiable risk factor for poor outcome.
Notes
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Cites: Cerebrovasc Dis. 2002;13(2):89-9411867881
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Cites: Circulation. 2007 May 22;115(20):e478-53417515473
PubMed ID
19131465 View in PubMed
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Adolescent turning points: the association between meaning-making and psychological well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129295
Source
Dev Psychol. 2012 Jul;48(4):1058-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Royette Tavernier
Teena Willoughby
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, L2S 3A1. rt09la@brocku.ca
Source
Dev Psychol. 2012 Jul;48(4):1058-68
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Concept Formation
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Research findings indicate that the ability to create meaning out of turning points (i.e., significant life experiences) is related to psychological well-being. It is not clear, however, whether individuals who report meaning-making and higher well-being are better adjusted prior to the experience of their turning point event. This study examined whether meaning-making and timing of turning points would be associated with higher scores on well-being. Participants were 418 Grade 12 students (209 of whom reported having had a turning point event and a matched group of 209 adolescents who did not report having had a turning point event). This subset of participants was taken from a larger longitudinal study of 803 (52% female) Grade 12 Canadian students (M age = 17 years). All participants completed well-being measures 3 years prior, when they were in Grade 9. Meaning-making was significantly associated with higher psychological well-being, controlling for Grade 9 scores on well-being. Importantly, adolescents who reported meaning-making in Grade 12 did not differ on well-being prior to the experience of their turning point event, when they were in Grade 9, from adolescents who did not report meaning-making. These findings highlight the importance of examining meaning-making in relation to positive adjustment among adolescents reporting a significant life-changing event. Limitations regarding the use of survey measures and the generalizability of the results to a culturally diverse group of adolescents are discussed.
PubMed ID
22122472 View in PubMed
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Age, education and occupation differentials in interregional migration: some evidence for Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256292
Source
Demography. 1971 May;8(2):195-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1971

The ageing of lung function: cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3559
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Sep;7(9):1653-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
A. Rode
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1994 Sep;7(9):1653-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Aging - physiology
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - ethnology
Smoking - physiopathology
Abstract
Three surveys (1969/1970, 1979/1980 and 1989/1990) have examined the impact of acculturation to a sedentary lifestyle on the pulmonary function of a circumpolar native Inuit community. The sample comprised more than 50% of those aged 20-60 yrs, most recently 119 males and 92 females. Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF) were measured by standard spirometric techniques, and information was obtained on smoking habits and health. Multiple regression equations showed that lung function was affected by height and age, but usually not by age squared. Cross-sectional age coefficients for FVC and FEV1 increased over the period 1969/1970 to 1989/1990. Parallel longitudinal trends were seen in FEV1 (males only). Multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed age-decade*cohort effects for FVC and FEV1 (males but not females). Almost all of the population now smoke (mean +/- SD males 13 +/- 8 cigarettes.day-1; females 11 +/- 7 cigarettes.day-1). However, smoking bears little relationship to lung function perhaps due to limited variance in consumption. About a third of the community have physician-diagnosed and/or radiographically visible chest disease, but with little effect upon pulmonary function. We conclude that an apparent secular trend to a faster ageing of lung function in men is not explained by disease or domestic air pollution. Possible factors include increased lung volumes in young adults, greater pack-years of cigarette exposure, nonspecific respiratory disease, increased inspiration of cold air or altered chest mechanics due to operation of high-speed snowmobiles, and loss of physical fitness.
PubMed ID
7995396 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and blood pressure: analysis of data from the Canada Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239402
Source
Prev Med. 1985 Jan;14(1):1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1985
Author
R A Coates
P N Corey
M J Ashley
C A Steele
Source
Prev Med. 1985 Jan;14(1):1-14
Date
Jan-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Canada
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - etiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Recent epidemiologic studies report a significant association between alcohol consumption and elevations in both systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a multivariate analysis of physical examination and other data on 721 men and 697 women aged 20 or more collected during the Canada Health Survey in 1978-1979. SBP and DBP were considered as separate dependent variables in multiple regression models with the following independent variables: age, alcohol consumption (measured as a 7-day recall history and as an average frequency of consumption), serum cholesterol, plasma glucose, physical activity, Quetelet index, parental history of hypertension, cigarette consumption, income, education, and exogenous hormonal use in women. In both weighted and unweighted multiple regression analyses, we could not demonstrate for either sex, a significant association between alcohol consumption (as recorded and following quadratic and logarithmic transformations) and either SBP or DBP. For both sexes, only age and Quetelet index were highly significantly (P less than 0.0001) and consistently associated with both SBP and DBP. No other independent variables were consistently associated, for either sex, with SBP and DBP. Further, the dose-response patterns noted by other investigators suggesting either a positive and linear relationship or a curvilinear relationship were not found in either our univariate or multivariate analyses. Rather, the alcohol-blood pressure curves showed no consistent patterns of any kind in either sex. These findings do not support recent claims that alcohol consumption is a determinant of elevations in either SBP or DBP.
PubMed ID
4034510 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic beverage type, recall period effects and functional disability: evidence from the 1983 NHIS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228954
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1990 Jun;25(3):257-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
R G Laforge
G D Williams
D A Parker
T C Harford
Author Affiliation
Brown University, Providence, RI.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1990 Jun;25(3):257-72
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Alcoholic Beverages - classification
Beer
Canada
Data Collection - instrumentation - methods
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Memory
Mental Recall
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
United States
Wine
Abstract
To replicate a Canada Health Survey (CHS) study that found beer drinking was associated with lower morbidity, National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data for 19,462 persons were used to examine associations between functional disability and beverage specific ethanol consumption. A functional disability index consisting of morbidity and symptom coping events reported for 2 weeks prior to the NHIS interview was constructed. Alcohol consumption was reported for the same period as disability (coincident recall), or for the 2 weeks prior to the respondent's last drink during the past year (antecedent recall). The analysis controlled for confounders using direct standardization and multiple logistic regression. The results of this investigation were not consistent with the CHS study. Former drinkers and antecedent recall drinkers reported greater disability rates than either non-drinkers or coincident recall drinkers. Antecedent recall drinkers exhibiting a preference for beer and wine were, respectively, 40 and 80 percent more likely to be disabled than non-drinkers. Further, this study found no evidence of a protective effect among any subgroup of drinkers. The finding of a significant interaction between alcohol consumption and alcohol recall period suggests that epidemiologic studies should give greater attention to the classification of drinker groups by proximity of alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
2347290 View in PubMed
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Altitude-related hypoxia: risk assessment and management for passengers on commerical aircraft.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183594
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 Sep;74(9):922-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Amir Mortazavi
Mark J Eisenberg
David Langleben
Pierre Ernst
Renee L Schiff
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 Sep;74(9):922-7
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine
Altitude Sickness - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aviation - organization & administration
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology
Humans
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk Management
Abstract
Individuals with pulmonary and cardiac disorders are particularly at risk of developing hypoxemia at altitude. Our objective is to describe the normal and maladaptive physiological responses to altitude-related hypoxia, to review existing methods and guidelines for preflight assessment of air travelers, and to provide recommendations for treatment of hypoxia at altitude.
Falling partial pressure of oxygen with altitude results in a number of physiologic adaptations including hyperventilation, pulmonary vasoconstriction, altered ventilation/perfusion matching, and increased sympathetic tone. According to three guideline statements, the arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) should be maintained above 50 to 55 mm Hg at all altitudes. General indicators such as oxygen saturation and sea level blood gases may be useful in predicting altitude hypoxia. More specialized techniques for estimation of altitude PaO2, such as regression equations, hypoxia challenge testing, and hypobaric chamber exposure have also been examined. A regression equation using sea level PaO2 and spirometric parameters can be used to estimate PaO2 at altitude. Hypoxia challenge testing, performed by exposing subjects to lower inspired FIO2 at sea level may be more precise. Hypobaric chamber exposure, the gold standard, mimics lower barometric pressure, but is mainly used in research.
Oxygen supplementation during air travel is needed for individuals with an estimated PaO2 (8000 ft) below 50 mmHg. There are a number of guidelines for the pre-flight assessment of patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac diseases. However, these data are based on small studies in patients with a limited group of diseases.
PubMed ID
14503669 View in PubMed
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407 records – page 1 of 41.