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1642 records – page 1 of 165.

A 2-year follow-up of 120 Swedish female alcoholics treated early in their drinking career: prediction of drinking outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10097
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
B. Haver
L. Dahlgren
A. Willander
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Alcohol and Drug Research Section, Stockholm, Sweden. brit.haver@psyk.uib.no
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1586-93
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - therapy
Biological Markers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: One hundred twenty women alcoholics recruited to a treatment program called EWA (Early Treatment for Women With Alcohol Addiction) were studied. The selected women were not previously treated for alcohol abuse. METHODS: The women were followed up by use of a structured personal interview, biomarkers sensitive for alcohol abuse (i.e., glutamyl transpeptidase), and questionnaires, by using defined criteria for abstinence, social drinking, satisfactory drinking outcome, and unsatisfactory drinking outcome. RESULTS: Drinking outcome was good (i.e., total abstinence, social drinking, or satisfactory drinking outcome) for 67% of the women during the total follow-up time, by use of strict criteria for relapse. The results were corroborated by the biomarkers. Similar results were reported from two previously studied groups of women from the same department. However, the frequency of abstinence was higher and social drinking was significantly lower among this sample of women. Daily drinking, the use of sedatives, and a long duration of pretreatment alcohol abuse predicted an unfavorable outcome. However, a long duration of outpatient treatment predicted a good outcome, whereas treatment dropout was related to an unsatisfactory drinking outcome. A majority of the women (96%) rated the treatment experience and the treatment program favorably. The overall good results might reflect the selection of the subjects studied. CONCLUSIONS: Improving treatment program adherence would probably improve outcome for the women with an unsatisfactory drinking outcome.
PubMed ID
11707633 View in PubMed
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10 year follow up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9689
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-12-2003
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Nina Wandall-Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Bispebjerg Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. merete.nordentoft@dadlnet.dk
Source
BMJ. 2003 Jul 12;327(7406):81
Date
Jul-12-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, and to identify predictors of death such as conditions during upbringing, mental illness, and misuse of alcohol and drugs. DESIGN: Register based follow up study. SETTING: Two hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen, Denmark PARTICIPANTS: 579 people who stayed in one hostel in Copenhagen in 1991, and a representative sample of 185 people who stayed in the original hostel and one other in Copenhagen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cause specific mortality. RESULTS: The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for both sexes was 3.8 (95% confidence interval 3.5 to 4.1); 2.8 (2.6 to 3.1) for men and 5.6 (4.3 to 6.9) for women. The age and sex standardised mortality ratio for suicide for both sexes was 6.0 (3.9 to 8.1), for death from natural causes 2.6 (2.3 to 2.9), for unintentional injuries 14.6 (11.4 to 17.8), and for unknown cause of death 62.9 (52.7 to 73.2). Mortality was comparatively higher in the younger age groups. It was also significantly higher among homeless people who had stayed in a hostel more than once and stayed fewer than 11 days, compared with the rest of the study group. Risk factors for early death were premature death of the father and misuse of alcohol and sedatives. CONCLUSION: Homeless people staying in hostels, particularly young women, are more likely to die early than the general population. Other predictors of early death include adverse experiences in childhood, such as death of the father, and misuse of alcohol and sedatives.
PubMed ID
12855527 View in PubMed
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[10-year follow-up study of mortality among users of hostels for homeless people in Copenhagen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Apr 26;166(18):1679-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2004

A 10-year prospective study of tobacco smoking and periodontal health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67464
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
J. Bergström
S. Eliasson
J. Dock
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Periodontol. 2000 Aug;71(8):1338-47
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Music
Observer Variation
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date only a few studies have evaluated the long-term influence of smoking and smoking cessation on periodontal health. The present study, therefore, was undertaken with the aim to prospectively investigate the influence of smoking exposure over time on the periodontal health condition in a targeted population before and after a follow-up interval of 10 years. METHODS: The primary study base consisted of a population of occupational musicians that was investigated the first time in 1982 and scheduled for reinvestigation in 1992 and 2002. The 1992 investigation included 101 individuals from the baseline study constituting a prospective cohort including 16 smokers, who had continued to smoke throughout the entire length of the 10-year period; 28 former smokers who had ceased smoking an average of approximately 9 years before the commencement of the baseline study; 40 non-smokers, who denied ever having smoked tobacco; and 17 individuals whose smoking pattern changed or for whom incomplete data were available. The clinical and radiographic variables used for the assessment of the periodontal health condition of the individual were frequency of periodontally diseased sites (probing depth > or =4 mm), gingival bleeding (%), and periodontal bone height (%). The oral hygiene standard was evaluated by means of a standard plaque index. RESULTS: The changes over the 10 years with respect to frequency of diseased sites indicated an increased frequency in continuous smokers versus decreased frequencies in former smokers and non-smokers. Controlling for age and frequency of diseased sites at baseline, the 10-year change was significantly associated with smoking (P
PubMed ID
10972650 View in PubMed
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30-year mortality after venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257922
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2014
Author
Kirstine Kobberøe Søgaard
Morten Schmidt
Lars Pedersen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. kks@clin.au.dk.
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Date
Sep-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on long-term mortality after venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse.
Using Danish medical databases, we conducted a 30-year nationwide population-based cohort study of 128 223 patients with first-time VTE (1980-2011) and a comparison cohort of 640 760 people from the general population (without VTE) randomly matched by sex, year of birth, and calendar period. The mortality risks for patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were markedly higher than for the comparison cohort during the first year, especially within the first 30 days (3.0% and 31% versus 0.4%). Using Cox regression, we assessed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall 30-year MRR was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.53-1.57) for DVT and 2.77 (95% CI, 2.74-2.81) for PE. The 30-day MRR was 5.38 (95% CI, 5.00-5.80) for DVT and 80.87 (95% CI, 76.02-86.02) for PE. Over time, the 30-day MRR was consistently 5- to 6-fold increased for DVT, whereas it improved for PE from 138 (95% CI, 125-153) in 1980 to 1989 to 36.08 (95% CI, 32.65-39.87) in 2000 to 2011. The 1- to 10-year and 11- to 30-year MRRs remained 25% to 40% increased after both DVT and PE but were 3- to 5-fold increased after DVT and 6- to 11-fold increased after PE when VTE was considered the immediate cause of death.
Patients with VTE are at increased risk of dying, especially within the first year after diagnosis, but also during the entire 30 years of follow-up, with VTE as an important cause of death. Although 30-day mortality after DVT remained fairly constant over the last 3 decades, it improved markedly for PE.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49625027484
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49725027486
PubMed ID
24970783 View in PubMed
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1913 men study - a longitudinal study of the development of stroke in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250389
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
R. Adolfsson
K. Svärdsudd
G. Tibblin
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1977;14:122-7
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Sedimentation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk
Smoking
Abstract
Risk factors for the development of stroke was studied in a prospective long-term investigation of 855 male in a random population sampled of the same age. After 13 years of follow-up 25 participants had suffered from stroke, which gives an incidence of 19/10,000 annually. At the 1963 year investigation several parametras were studied. The stroke-prone person had higher values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and had a significant greater total heart volume. Blood parametras as the fasting of serum cholesterole, triglyceride and erytrocyte sedimentation rate were significantly elevated in those who developed stroke. They also tended to consume more coffee and showed a higher tobacco consumption. By applying the multiple regression model it was disclosed that the most predective risk-variables were diastolic blood pressure, erytrocyte sedimentation rate and smoking habits.
PubMed ID
298994 View in PubMed
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Abdominal massage for people with constipation: a cost utility analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142788
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Kristina Lämås
Lars Lindholm
Birgitta Engström
Catrine Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. kristina.lamas@nurs.umu.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2010 Aug;66(8):1719-29
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Constipation - economics - physiopathology - therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Laxatives - economics - therapeutic use
Male
Massage - economics - nursing
Middle Aged
Patient Dropouts
Patient Education as Topic
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Self Care - economics
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study conducted to evaluate change in health-related quality of life for people with constipation receiving abdominal massage and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two alternative scenarios developed from the original trial.
Constipation is a common problem and is associated with decrease in quality of life. Abdominal massage appears to decrease the severity of gastrointestinal symptoms, but its impact on health-related quality of life has not been assessed.
A randomized controlled trial including 60 participants was conducted in Sweden between 2005 and 2007. The control group continued using laxatives as before and the intervention group received additional abdominal massage. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D and analyzed with linear regression. Two scenarios were outlined to conduct a cost utility analysis. In the self-massage scenario patients learned to give self-massage, and in the professional massage scenario patients in hospital received abdominal massage from an Enrolled Nurse.
Linear regression analysis showed that health-related quality of life was statistically significantly increased after 8 weeks of abdominal massage. About 40% were estimated to receive good effect. For 'self-massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro75,000 for the first 16 weeks. For every additional week of abdominal massage, the average dropped and eventually approached euro8300. For 'professional massage', the cost per quality adjusted life year was euro60,000 and eventually dropped to euro28,000.
Abdominal massage may be cost-effective in the long-term and it is relevant to consider it when managing constipation. A crucial aspect will be to identify those who will benefit.
PubMed ID
20557387 View in PubMed
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Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
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Ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly people in a health district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72190
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
O. Söderhamn
C. Lindencrona
A. Ek
Author Affiliation
Vänersborg University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 236, SE-462 23, Vänersborg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2000 Aug;37(4):361-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Care
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe the ability for self-care among home dwelling elderly in the community in a health district in western Sweden. Two self-report instruments plus a number of self-care related questions were distributed by mail to an age stratified random sample and finally completed by a total of 125 subjects. Bivariate and multivariate statistical methods were used in the analyses. The results showed that self-care ability and self-care agency decreased for respondents 75+ years of age. Self-care ability was predicted by three productive means for self-care and four risk factors.
PubMed ID
10760543 View in PubMed
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Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125355
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Barfod
Marlene Mauson Pankoke Lauritzen
Jakob Klim Danker
György Sölétormos
Jakob Lundager Forberg
Peter Anthony Berlac
Freddy Lippert
Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm
Kristian Antonsen
Kai Henrik Wiborg Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hillerød Hospital, Denmark. cbar@hih.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Triage - methods - statistics & numerical data
Vital Signs
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT) system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures.
The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT) and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, T(vitals), and presenting complaint, T(complaint). The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, T(final). We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures.
The covariates, T(vitals), T(complaint) and T(final) were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), systolic blood pressure (BP) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5%) and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%). More than half of the patients had a T(complaint) more urgent than T(vitals), the opposite was true in just 6% of the patients.
The HAPT system is valid in terms of predicting in-hospital mortality and ICU admission in the adult acute population. Abnormal vital signs are strongly associated with adverse outcome, while including the presenting complaint in the triage model may result in over-triage.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22490208 View in PubMed
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1642 records – page 1 of 165.