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Adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98176
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
D. Iggman
J. Arnlöv
B. Vessby
T. Cederholm
P. Sjögren
U. Risérus
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):850-7
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Aged
Chromatography, Gas
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - etiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Docosahexaenoic Acids - analysis
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - analysis
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Health Surveys
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Palmitic Acid - analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Dietary fatty acids may affect insulin sensitivity. Adipose tissue fatty acid composition partly reflects long-term dietary intake, but data from large studies regarding relationships with insulin sensitivity are lacking. We aimed to determine the association between adipose tissue fatty acids and insulin sensitivity in elderly Swedish men. METHODS: In a cross-sectional analysis of the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 795, mean age 71 years), adipose tissue biopsies were obtained and fatty acid composition was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. Insulin sensitivity was measured directly by a euglycaemic clamp. RESULTS: Palmitic acid (16:0), the major saturated fatty acid (SFA) in the diet and in adipose tissue, was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.14), as were 16:1 n-7 (r = -0.15), 20:3 n-6 (r = -0.31), 20:4 n-6 (r = -0.38), 22:4 n-6 (r = -0.37) and 22:5 n-3 (r = -0.24; p
Notes
RefSource: Diabetologia. 2010 May;53(5):799-801
PubMed ID
20127308 View in PubMed
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Cadmium exposure in pregnancy and lactation in relation to iron status

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63737
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Feb;92(2):284-287
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
  1 website  
Author
Akesson, A
Berglund, M
Schütz, A
Bjellerup, P
Bremme, K
Vahter, M
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Metals and Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.akesson@imm.ki.se
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Feb;92(2):284-287
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadmium - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Cadmium Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Lactation - metabolism
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Parity
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of iron status on cadmium dose among pregnant women. METHODS: Iron status and cadmium concentration in blood, urine, and placenta were determined among women followed for 2 years from early pregnancy. RESULTS: Blood cadmium and urinary cadmium were correlated with iron status throughout the study period. Urinary cadmium increased longitudinally among women with exhausted iron stores during their pregnancy. The increase in urinary cadmium with age was more pronounced in multiparous than in nulliparous women. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deficiency during pregnancy leads to increased cadmium absorption and body burden. Multiparous women exhibit additional increases with increasing age.
PubMed ID
11818307 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and infant ponderal index at birth in the Swedish Medical Birth Register, 1991-1992

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58796
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2000 Mar;90(3):420-423
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
  1 website  
Author
Lindley AA
Gray RH
Herman AA
Becker S
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, National Center for Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md., USA. aal5@po.cwru.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2000 Mar;90(3):420-423
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Crown-Rump Length
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy on infant body proportion. METHODS: The ponderal index, defined as birthweight divided by crown-heel length cubed, was examined in 207,607 infants from the Swedish Medical Birth Register for 1991 and 1992. RESULTS: Infant ponderal index was used as the outcome variable in an ordinary least squares continuous regression, which included early pregnancy smoking status, gestational age, and birthweight among the predictors. Ponderal index increased by 0.030 (+/- 0.0014) among infants of moderate smokers and by 0.040 (+/- 0.0017) among infants of heavy smokers, showing a dose response. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking differentially alters the trajectory of weight vs length growth in the fetus.
PubMed ID
10705863 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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