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Alcohol consumption among Alaskan drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3010
Source
Pages 447-453 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
- nificantly. No other main effects or interac- tions were found. In Table 4, a stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed five variables to be signifi- cantly related (p < .05) to alcohol consumption. accounting for 9% of the variance. Positively related were: (a) greater perceived risk of get- ting
  1 document  
Author
Turner, S.J.
Paschane, D.M.
Johnson, M.E.
Fisher, D.G.
Fenaughty, A.M.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, USA.
Source
Pages 447-453 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Data Collection
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated predictors of alcohol consumption among drug users not currently in treatment in Anchorage, Alaska. Data were collected from 114 female and 269 male drug users via structured interviews. Alcohol consumption was defined as estimated number of drinks consumed in the last 30 days. Results revealed a high proportion consuming alcohol within the last 48 hours and 30 days (73% and 96%, respectively). Stepwise multiple regression revealed that five variables, accounting for 9% of the variance, were significantly related to alcohol consumption. Positively related were greater perceived risk of getting AIDS; obtaining income from spouse, family, or friend; living on the streets or in a shelter; or living in a hotel or boarding house. Negatively related was having an education level greater than high school. For those participants who reported having sex during the last 30 days, two variables were positively related to alcohol consumption and accounted for 17% of the variance: numberof times used alcohol with sex and frequency of sex without a condom. In addition to identifying several demographic variables that are significantly related to alcohol consumption, the results document the relationship between alcohol consumption and unsafe sexual practices.
PubMed ID
10093323 View in PubMed
Documents
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Menstrual cycle characteristics in fertile women from Greenland, Poland and Ukraine exposed to perfluorinated chemicals: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302411
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Feb;29(2):359-67. doi: 10.1093/humrep/det390. Epub 2013 Oct 25.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lyngsø J
Ramlau-Hansen CH
Høyer BB
Støvring H
Bonde JP
Jönsson BA
Lindh CH
Pedersen HS
Ludwicki JK
Zviezdai V
Toft G
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Feb;29(2):359-67. doi: 10.1093/humrep/det390. Epub 2013 Oct 25.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
PFOA
Alkanesulfonic Acids
Adverse effects
Body mass index
Caprylates
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fluorocarbons
Greenland
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Drug effects
Menstruation Disturbances
Etiology
Poland
Prenatal Care
Regression Analysis
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Ukraine
PFOS
Abstract
STUDY QUESTION: Does perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanate (PFOA) exposure disrupt the menstrual cyclicity?
SUMMARY ANSWER: The female reproductive system may be sensitive to PFOA exposure, with longer menstrual cycle length at higher exposure.
WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: PFOS and PFOA are persistent man-made chemicals. Experimental animal studies suggest they are reproductive toxicants but epidemiological findings are inconsistent.
STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: A cross-sectional study including 1623 pregnant women from the INUENDO cohort enrolled during antenatal care visits between June 2002 and May 2004 in Greenland, Poland and Ukraine.
PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Information on menstrual cycle characteristics was obtained by questionnaires together with a blood sample from each pregnant woman. Serum concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were measured by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple imputations were performed to account for missing data. The association between PFOS/PFOA and menstrual cycle length (short cycle: =24 days, long cycle: =32 days) and irregularities (=7 days in difference between cycles) was analyzed using logistic regression with tertiles of exposure. Estimates are given as adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Higher exposure levels of PFOA were associated with longer menstrual cycles in pooled estimates of all three countries. Compared with women in the lowest exposure tertile, the adjusted OR of long cycles was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.0; 3.3) among women in the highest tertile of PFOA exposure. No significant associations were observed between PFOS exposure and menstrual cycle characteristics. However, we observed a tendency toward more irregular cycles with higher exposure to PFOS [OR 1.7 (95% CI: 0.8; 3.5)]. The overall response rate was 45.3% with considerable variation between countries (91.3% in Greenland, 69.1% in Poland and 26.3% in Ukraine).
LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Possible limitations in our study include varying participation rates across countries; a selected study group overrepresenting the most fertile part of the population; retrospective information on menstrual cycle characteristics; the determination of cut-points for all three outcome variables; and lacking information on some determinants of menstrual cycle characteristics, such as stress, physical activity, chronic diseases and gynecological disorders, thus confounding cannot be excluded.
WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: The generalizability of the study results is restricted to fertile women who manage to conceive and women who do not use oral contraceptives when getting pregnant or within 2 months before getting pregnant. To our knowledge only one previous epidemiological study has addressed the possible association between perfluorinated chemical exposure and menstrual disturbances. Though pointing toward different disturbances in cyclicity, both studies suggest that exposure to PFOA may affect the female reproductive function. This study contributes to the limited knowledge on effects of exposure to PFOA and PFOS on female reproductive function and suggests that the female reproductive system may be affected by environmental exposure to PFOA.
STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): Supported by a scholarship from Aarhus University Research Foundation. The collection of questionnaire data and blood samples was part of the INUENDO project supported by The European Commission (Contract no. QLK4-CT-2001-00 202), www.inuendo.dk. The Ukrainian part of the study was possible by a grant from INTAS (project 012 2205). Determination of PFOA and PFOS in serum was part of the CLEAR study (www.inuendo.dk/clear) supported by the European Commission's 7th Framework Program (FP7-ENV-2008-1-226217). No conflict of interest declared.
PubMed ID
24163265 View in PubMed
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Phthalates, perfluoroalkyl acids, metals and organochlorines and reproductive function: a multipollutant assessment in Greenlandic, Polish and Ukrainian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302415
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Jun;72(6):385-93. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2014-102264. Epub 2014 Sep 10.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lenters V
Portengen L
Smit LA
Jönsson BA
Giwercman A
Rylander L
Lindh CH
Spanò M
Pedersen HS
Ludwicki JK
Chumak L
Piersma AH
Toft G
Bonde JP
Heederik D
Vermeulen R
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Jun;72(6):385-93. doi: 10.1136/oemed-2014-102264. Epub 2014 Sep 10.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants
toxicity
Gonadal Hormones
Greenland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Biomarkers
Male
Metals
Phthalic Acids
Poland
Regression Analysis
Reproduction
Drug effects
Semen Analysis
Sperm Motility
Ukraine
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Numerous environmental contaminants have been linked to adverse reproductive health outcomes. However, the complex correlation structure of exposures and multiple testing issues limit the interpretation of existing evidence. Our objective was to identify, from a large set of contaminant exposures, exposure profiles associated with biomarkers of male reproductive function.
METHODS: In this cross-sectional study (n=602), male partners of pregnant women were enrolled between 2002 and 2004 during antenatal care visits in Greenland, Poland and Ukraine. Fifteen contaminants were detected in more than 70% of blood samples, including metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) and diisononyl phthalates (DEHP, DiNP), perfluoroalkyl acids, metals and organochlorines. Twenty-two reproductive biomarkers were assessed, including serum levels of reproductive hormones, markers of semen quality, sperm chromatin integrity, epididymal and accessory sex gland function, and Y:X chromosome ratio. We evaluated multipollutant models with sparse partial least squares (sPLS) regression, a simultaneous dimension reduction and variable selection approach which accommodates joint modelling of correlated exposures.
RESULTS: Of the over 300 exposure-outcome associations tested in sPLS models, we detected 10 associations encompassing 8 outcomes. Several associations were notably consistent in direction across the three study populations: positive associations between mercury and inhibin B, and between cadmium and testosterone; and inverse associations between DiNP metabolites and testosterone, between polychlorinated biphenyl-153 and progressive sperm motility, and between a DEHP metabolite and neutral a-glucosidase, a marker of epididymal function.
CONCLUSIONS: This global assessment of a mixture of environmental contaminants provides further indications that some organochlorines and phthalates adversely affect some parameters of male reproductive health.
PubMed ID
25209848 View in PubMed
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