Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does clinical remission lead to normalization of EQ-5D in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and is selection of remission criteria important?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98338
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):285-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Louise Linde
Jan Sørensen
Mikkel Østergaard
Kim Hørslev-Petersen
Merete Lund Hetland
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. louiselinde@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):285-90
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Remission Induction
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to that of the general population and to investigate the association with disease activity, focusing on different clinical remission criteria. METHODS: EQ-5D data from 3156 patients with RA from 11 Danish centers were compared with Danish EQ-5D population norms (n = 16,136). The Disease Activity Score (DAS28) and the Clinical Disease Activity Index score (CDAI) were used as definitions of disease activity and clinical remission. The score difference (DeltaEQ-5D) was calculated in each patient as the difference from the age and sex-matched general population and adjusted for age, marital status, education, body mass index, smoking, exercise habits, disease duration, IgM-rheumatoid factor status, joint surgery, extraarticular features, treatment, and comorbidity in multiple linear regression models. RESULTS: 37% vs 22% fulfilled the DAS28 and CDAI remission criteria, respectively. The DeltaEQ-5D values for women/men in clinical remission were DAS28 0.05/0.06 vs CDAI 0.01/0.02; low disease activity: DAS28 0.12/0.13 vs CDAI 0.11/0.14; moderate disease activity: DAS28 0.18/0.20 vs CDAI 0.20/0.23; and high disease activity: DAS28 0.38/0.28 vs CDAI 0.33/0.26. Adjusting for confounders reduced the DeltaEQ-5D values between 0 and 0.04 units. CONCLUSION: Patients with RA had worse EQ-5D scores than the general population, and the difference was strongly associated with disease activity. The EQ-5D score for patients in clinical remission approached that of the general population, suggesting that strict treatment goals are critical in order to achieve near-normal HRQOL in patients with RA.
Notes
RefSource: J Rheumatol. 2010 Feb;37(2):223-5
PubMed ID
20080905 View in PubMed
Less detail

Education reduces the effects of genetic susceptibilities to poor physical health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98807
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):406-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Wendy Johnson
Kirsten Ohm Kyvik
Erik L Mortensen
Axel Skytthe
G David Batty
Ian J Deary
Author Affiliation
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. wendy.johnson@ed.ac.uk
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):406-14
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Social Class
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Greater education is associated with better physical health. This has been of great concern to public health officials. Most demonstrations show that education influences mean levels of health. Little is known about the influence of education on variance in health status, or about how this influence may impact the underlying genetic and environmental sources of health problems. This study explored these influences. METHODS: In a 2002 postal questionnaire, 21 522 members of same-sex pairs in the Danish Twin Registry born between 1931 and 1982 reported physical health in the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental variance in physical health differed with level of education, adjusting for birth-year effects. RESULTS: and Conclusions As expected, greater education was associated with better physical health. Greater education was also associated with smaller variance in health status. In both sexes, 2 standard deviations (SDs) above mean educational level, variance in physical health was only about half that among those 2 SDs below. This was because fewer highly educated people reported poor health. There was less total variance in health primarily because there was less genetic variance. Education apparently reduced expression of genetic susceptibilities to poor health. The patterns of genetic and environmental correlations suggested that this might take place because more educated people manage their environments to protect their health. If so, fostering the personal charactieristics associated with educational attainment could be important in reducing the education-health gradient.
Notes
RefSource: Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):415-6
PubMed ID
19861402 View in PubMed
Less detail

A population-based registry study of infant mortality in the Arctic: Greenland and Denmark, 1973-1997

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30480
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Mar;94(3):452-457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
  1 website  
Author
Friborg, J
Koch, A
Stenz, F
Wohlfahrt, J
Melbye, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. jfr@ssi.dk
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Mar;94(3):452-457
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Birth Order
Birth weight
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine precise estimates of infant mortality rates and to describe overall trends in infant mortality in Greenland and Denmark from 1973 to 1997. METHODS: We analyzed data from population-based registries of all live-born infants in Greenland and Denmark to calculate infant mortality rates from 1973 to 1997. RESULTS: Between the periods of 1973-1977 and 1993-1997, neonatal mortality rates in Greenland declined from 20.9 per 1000 live-born infants to 15.7, and postneonatal mortality rates declined from 20.9 per 1000 to 5.9. Infant mortality rates were significantly higher in Greenland than in Denmark, and the excess mortality was uniformly distributed over all birthweight percentiles. In Greenland, the risk of infant death was significantly lower if the mother was born outside Greenland. CONCLUSIONS: Postneonatal mortality rates in Greenland have decreased significantly during the past 25 years, but little progress has been made in decreasing neonatal mortality rates. Disparities exist among children with different maternal origins.
PubMed ID
14998813 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail

Seasonal variation in objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time, cardio-respiratory fitness and sleep duration among 8-11 year-old Danish children: a repeated-measures study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107423
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:808
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mads F Hjorth
Jean-Philippe Chaput
Kim Michaelsen
Arne Astrup
Inge Tetens
Anders Sjödin
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Copenhagen, Denmark. madsfiil@life.ku.dk.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:808
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Cardiovascular System
Child
Child Welfare
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory System
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Sleep
Time Factors
Abstract
Understanding fluctuations in lifestyle indicators is important to identify relevant time periods to intervene in order to promote a healthy lifestyle; however, objective assessment of multiple lifestyle indicators has never been done using a repeated-measures design. The primary aim was, therefore, to examine between-season and within-week variation in physical activity, sedentary behaviour, cardio-respiratory fitness and sleep duration among 8-11 year-old children.
A total of 1021 children from nine Danish schools were invited to participate and 834 accepted. Due to missing data, 730 children were included in the current analytical sample. An accelerometer was worn for 7 days and 8 nights during autumn, winter and spring, from which physical activity, sedentary time and sleep duration were measured. Cardio-respiratory fitness was assessed using a 10-min intermittent running test.
The children had 5% more sedentary time, 23% less time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and 2% longer sleep duration during winter compared to spring and cardio-respiratory fitness was 4% higher during spring compared to autumn (P?
Notes
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Apr;39(4):622-917414799
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jul;43(7):1360-821131873
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Aug;14(4):526-3117667643
Cites: Pediatrics. 2007 Oct;120(4):e769-7617908734
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2007 Nov;92(11):963-917855437
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2007;24(5):875-8817994343
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2007 Sep;85(9):660-718026621
Cites: Sleep. 2008 Jan;31(1):71-818220080
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Feb 4;170(6):448-5118252179
Cites: J Pediatr Psychol. 2008 May;33(4):406-718310663
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2008 Jun;18(3):298-30817555541
Cites: Sleep. 2008 May;31(5):619-2618517032
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2008 Jun;79(2):256-6018664049
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Jul 15;174(2):173-8421467152
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2011 Aug;21(4):424-3120650946
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e2295821886770
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):369-7422032104
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Feb 15;307(7):704-1222337681
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2012 Mar;9(3):336-4321934156
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2012 Jun;7(3):251-822461356
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Dec;40(8):693-70323108477
Cites: Pediatr Obes. 2013 Feb;8(1):42-5122962067
Cites: BMJ. 2000 May 6;320(7244):1240-310797032
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2003 Jun;37(3):197-206; discussion 20612782543
Cites: Naturwissenschaften. 1984 Jun;71(6):316-96472481
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 1993 Jun;64(2):127-338341835
Cites: Sleep. 1994 Apr;17(3):201-77939118
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1998 Jan;8(1):56-639465995
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2005;65(1):65-7615859028
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 2006 Sep;77(3):391-517020083
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2008 Dec;48(4):434-718997644
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Feb;19(1):10-818248534
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Feb;19(1):30-518248540
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2009 Mar;19(3):180-619217000
Cites: Ann Hum Biol. 2009 Jul-Aug;36(4):363-7819437171
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2009 Aug;38(4):1082-9319377098
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Oct;107(3):251-7119609553
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2008 Dec;26(14):1557-6518949660
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 May;42(5):928-3419996997
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Feb;36(1):59-64; 65-7121326378
Cites: Sleep Med Rev. 2011 Aug;15(4):259-6721237680
Cites: BMJ. 2007 Jul 28;335(7612):19417591624
PubMed ID
24010811 View in PubMed
Less detail