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Alcohol consumption among Alaskan drug users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3010
Source
Pages 447-453 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
- nificantly. No other main effects or interac- tions were found. In Table 4, a stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed five variables to be signifi- cantly related (p < .05) to alcohol consumption. accounting for 9% of the variance. Positively related were: (a) greater perceived risk of get- ting
  1 document  
Author
Turner, S.J.
Paschane, D.M.
Johnson, M.E.
Fisher, D.G.
Fenaughty, A.M.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage, USA.
Source
Pages 447-453 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alaska - epidemiology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Data Collection
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated predictors of alcohol consumption among drug users not currently in treatment in Anchorage, Alaska. Data were collected from 114 female and 269 male drug users via structured interviews. Alcohol consumption was defined as estimated number of drinks consumed in the last 30 days. Results revealed a high proportion consuming alcohol within the last 48 hours and 30 days (73% and 96%, respectively). Stepwise multiple regression revealed that five variables, accounting for 9% of the variance, were significantly related to alcohol consumption. Positively related were greater perceived risk of getting AIDS; obtaining income from spouse, family, or friend; living on the streets or in a shelter; or living in a hotel or boarding house. Negatively related was having an education level greater than high school. For those participants who reported having sex during the last 30 days, two variables were positively related to alcohol consumption and accounted for 17% of the variance: numberof times used alcohol with sex and frequency of sex without a condom. In addition to identifying several demographic variables that are significantly related to alcohol consumption, the results document the relationship between alcohol consumption and unsafe sexual practices.
PubMed ID
10093323 View in PubMed
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Cancer disparities among Alaska native people, 1970-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266903
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2014;11:E221
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
men and women were found for 1985–1995, 10 or more years earlier than the decline among ANs. Figure 1. Joinpoint regression analysis to detect changes in incidence trends among Alaska Native people, 1970–2011. A, All cancer sites combined, men and women. B, Breast cancer, women. C, Lung cancer, men
  1 document  
Author
Janet J Kelly
Anne P Lanier
Teresa Schade
Jennifer Brantley
B Michael Starkey
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2014;11:E221
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
499669
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
Neoplasm Invasiveness - diagnosis
Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
SEER Program
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death among Alaska Native people. The objective of this study was to examine cancer incidence data for 2007-2011, age-specific rates for a 15-year period, incidence trends for 1970-2011, and mortality trends for 1990-2011.
US data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program SEER*Stat database and from the SEER Alaska Native Tumor Registry. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates among Alaska Native people and US whites were compared using rate ratios. Trend analyses were performed using the Joinpoint Regression Program. Mortality data were from National Center for Health Statistics.
During 2007-2011 the cancer incidence rate among Alaska Native women was 16% higher than the rate among US white women and was similar among Alaska Native men and US white men. Incidence rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for nasopharyngeal, stomach, colorectal, lung, and kidney cancer. A downward trend in colorectal cancer incidence among Alaska Native people occurred from 1999 to 2011. Significant declines in rates were not observed for other frequently diagnosed cancers or for all sites combined. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people during 2 periods, 1990-2000 and 2001-2011, did not decline. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for all cancers combined; for cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas, kidney, and cervix; and for colorectal cancer.
Increases in colorectal screening among Alaska Native people may be responsible for current declines in colorectal cancer incidence; however; improvements in treatment of colon and rectal cancers may also be contributing factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25523352 View in PubMed
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Comparisons of total serum cholesterol and triglycerides between town and farm dwelling Icelandic youths

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76554
Source
Pages 268-275 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
  1 document  
Author
Way, A.
Axelsson, J.
Pétursdóttir, G.
Sigfússon, N.
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, School of Medicine, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Source
Pages 268-275 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cardiovascular risk factors
Cholesterol
Multiple regression analysis
Triglycerides
Documents
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Source
Pages 161-164 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
  1 document  
Author
Lepp�¤luoto, J
Sikkil�¤, K
Meyer-Rochow, VB
Hassi, J
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland. juhani.leppaluoto@oulu.fi
Source
Pages 161-164 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Biorhythm
Humans
Light
Male
Melatonin - secretion - urine
Periodicity
Radioimmunoassay
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Solar irradiance
Visual perception
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We set out to find out in which way seasonal changes of environmental luminosity could affect melatonin secretion in humans. STUDY DESIGN: For an entire year we collected every two months nocturnal urine samples from 20 male outdoor workers who lived and worked in an area of the circumpolar region from which exact data solar irradiance and temperature were available. METHODS: Melatonin secretion rates were assessed with our melatonin-specific radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Melatonin secretion was twice as high in December as in April, 0.88 +/- 16 nmol/12 h (mean +/- SE) vs. 0.43 +/- 9 nmol/12 h, p
PubMed ID
15762020 View in PubMed
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