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Cadmium exposure in pregnancy and lactation in relation to iron status

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63737
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Feb;92(2):284-287
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
  1 website  
Author
Akesson, A
Berglund, M
Schütz, A
Bjellerup, P
Bremme, K
Vahter, M
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Metals and Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.akesson@imm.ki.se
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2002 Feb;92(2):284-287
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cadmium - metabolism - pharmacokinetics
Cadmium Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Iron - deficiency
Lactation - metabolism
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Parity
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of iron status on cadmium dose among pregnant women. METHODS: Iron status and cadmium concentration in blood, urine, and placenta were determined among women followed for 2 years from early pregnancy. RESULTS: Blood cadmium and urinary cadmium were correlated with iron status throughout the study period. Urinary cadmium increased longitudinally among women with exhausted iron stores during their pregnancy. The increase in urinary cadmium with age was more pronounced in multiparous than in nulliparous women. CONCLUSIONS: Iron deficiency during pregnancy leads to increased cadmium absorption and body burden. Multiparous women exhibit additional increases with increasing age.
PubMed ID
11818307 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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A comparison of prenatal care use in the United States and Europe

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64869
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1993 Jan;83(1):31-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1993
  1 website  
Author
Buekens, P
Kotelchuck, M
Blondel, B
Kristensen, FB
Chen, JH
Masuy-Stroobant, G
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1993 Jan;83(1):31-36
Date
Jan-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Europe
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marital status
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - utilization
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. We sought to describe prenatal care use in the United States and in three European countries where accessibility to prenatal care has been reported to be better than it is in the United States. METHODS. We analyzed the 1980 US National Natality Survey, the 1981 French National Natality Survey, a 1979 sample of Danish births, and a survey performed from 1979 to 1980 in one Belgian province. RESULTS. The proportion of women who began prenatal care late (after 15 weeks) is highest in the United States (21.2%) and lowest in France (4.0%). This contrasts with the median number of visits, which is greater in the United States (11) than in Denmark (10) or in France (7). Across all maternal ages, parities, and educational levels, late initiation of prenatal care is more frequent in the United States, and median number of visits in the United States is equal to or higher than that in the other countries. CONCLUSIONS. In countries that offer nearly universal access to prenatal care, women begin care earlier during pregnancy and have fewer visits than women in the United States.
PubMed ID
8417603 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Maternal cigarette smoking during pregnancy and infant ponderal index at birth in the Swedish Medical Birth Register, 1991-1992

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58796
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2000 Mar;90(3):420-423
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
  1 website  
Author
Lindley AA
Gray RH
Herman AA
Becker S
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, National Center for Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md., USA. aal5@po.cwru.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2000 Mar;90(3):420-423
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Crown-Rump Length
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study examined the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy on infant body proportion. METHODS: The ponderal index, defined as birthweight divided by crown-heel length cubed, was examined in 207,607 infants from the Swedish Medical Birth Register for 1991 and 1992. RESULTS: Infant ponderal index was used as the outcome variable in an ordinary least squares continuous regression, which included early pregnancy smoking status, gestational age, and birthweight among the predictors. Ponderal index increased by 0.030 (+/- 0.0014) among infants of moderate smokers and by 0.040 (+/- 0.0017) among infants of heavy smokers, showing a dose response. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking differentially alters the trajectory of weight vs length growth in the fetus.
PubMed ID
10705863 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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A population-based registry study of infant mortality in the Arctic: Greenland and Denmark, 1973-1997

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30480
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Mar;94(3):452-457
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
  1 website  
Author
Friborg, J
Koch, A
Stenz, F
Wohlfahrt, J
Melbye, M
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. jfr@ssi.dk
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2004 Mar;94(3):452-457
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Birth Order
Birth weight
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Registries
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine precise estimates of infant mortality rates and to describe overall trends in infant mortality in Greenland and Denmark from 1973 to 1997. METHODS: We analyzed data from population-based registries of all live-born infants in Greenland and Denmark to calculate infant mortality rates from 1973 to 1997. RESULTS: Between the periods of 1973-1977 and 1993-1997, neonatal mortality rates in Greenland declined from 20.9 per 1000 live-born infants to 15.7, and postneonatal mortality rates declined from 20.9 per 1000 to 5.9. Infant mortality rates were significantly higher in Greenland than in Denmark, and the excess mortality was uniformly distributed over all birthweight percentiles. In Greenland, the risk of infant death was significantly lower if the mother was born outside Greenland. CONCLUSIONS: Postneonatal mortality rates in Greenland have decreased significantly during the past 25 years, but little progress has been made in decreasing neonatal mortality rates. Disparities exist among children with different maternal origins.
PubMed ID
14998813 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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