Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Emotion regulation group therapy for deliberate self-harm: a multi-site evaluation in routine care using an uncontrolled open trial design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292219
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Oct 05; 7(10):e016220
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-05-2017
Author
Hanna Sahlin
Johan Bjureberg
Kim L Gratz
Matthew T Tull
Erik Hedman
Jonas Bjärehed
Jussi Jokinen
Lars-Gunnar Lundh
Brjánn Ljótsson
Clara Hellner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Oct 05; 7(10):e016220
Date
Oct-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Behavior Therapy - methods
Borderline Personality Disorder - complications
Emotions
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Regression Analysis
Self-Injurious Behavior - therapy
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Emotion regulation group therapy (ERGT) has shown promising results in several efficacy trials. However, it has not been evaluated outside a research setting. In order to increase the availability of empirically supported treatments for individuals with borderline personality disorder and deliberate self-harm, an evaluation of ERGT in routine clinical care was conducted with therapists of different professional backgrounds who had received brief intensive training in ERGT prior to trial onset.
Multi-site evaluation, using an uncontrolled open trial design with assessments at pretreatment, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up.
14 adult outpatient psychiatric clinics across Sweden.
Ninety-five women (mean age=25.1 years) with borderline personality disorder (both threshold and subthreshold) and repeated self-harm were enrolled in the study. Ninety-three per cent of participants completed the post-treatment assessment and 88% completed the follow-up assessment.
Primary outcome was self-harm frequency as measured with the Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory. Secondary outcomes included self-harm versatility, emotion dysregulation, other self-destructive behaviours, depression, anxiety, stress symptoms and interpersonal and vocational difficulties.
ERGT is an adjunctive, 14-week, acceptance-based behavioural group treatment that directly targets both self-harm and its proposed underlying mechanism of emotion dysregulation.
At post-treatment, intent-to-treat analyses revealed a significant improvement associated with a moderate effect size on the primary outcome of self-harm frequency (51%, reduction; Cohen's d=0.52, p
Notes
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;165(4):468-78 PMID 18281407
Cites: Arch Suicide Res. 2013;17(4):397-415 PMID 24224673
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1999 Jan;156(1):5-10 PMID 9892291
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2011 Jan;49(1):4-10 PMID 20970117
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2009 Nov;120(5):373-7 PMID 19807718
Cites: Br J Clin Psychol. 2012 Jun;51(2):121-41 PMID 22574799
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2010 Aug;30(6):768-78 PMID 20619943
Cites: Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1998 Oct;68(4):609-20 PMID 9809120
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 May;72(5):475-82 PMID 25806661
Cites: J Ment Health. 2012 Dec;21(6):548-55 PMID 22958107
Cites: J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2003 Sep-Dec;34(3-4):313-24 PMID 14972676
Cites: Personal Disord. 2011 Oct;2(4):316-26 PMID 22448804
Cites: Am Psychol. 1992 Dec;47(12):1578-85 PMID 1476328
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1998;59 Suppl 20:22-33;quiz 34-57 PMID 9881538
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2000 Mar;20(2):235-53 PMID 10721499
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;166(12):1365-74 PMID 19755574
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1999 Oct;156(10):1563-9 PMID 10518167
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Jul;63(7):757-66 PMID 16818865
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 1998 Nov;54(7):973-83 PMID 9811134
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2014 Oct;61:12-22 PMID 25113523
Cites: Psychother Psychosom Med Psychol. 2001 May;51(5):201-11 PMID 11417358
Cites: J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2000 Jun;31(2):73-86 PMID 11132119
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 May;123(5):327-38 PMID 21166785
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;168(12):1266-77 PMID 22193671
Cites: J Psychopathol Behav Assess. 2016 Jun;38(2):284-296 PMID 27239096
Cites: Personal Disord. 2014 Jan;5(1):97-107 PMID 24588066
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2011 Sep;133(1-2):257-64 PMID 21463900
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 May;168(5):495-501 PMID 21285141
Cites: Curr Opin Psychol. 2015 Jun 1;3:85-90 PMID 25859561
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Jul;44(10):2099-112 PMID 23985088
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;50(8):772-81 PMID 21784297
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 1995 Mar;33(3):335-43 PMID 7726811
Cites: Cogn Behav Ther. 2010;39(4):239-50 PMID 20972912
Cites: J Pers Disord. 2012 Aug;26(4):568-82 PMID 22867507
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2007 Dec;45(12):3060-8 PMID 17559803
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2014 Jun;44(3):273-303 PMID 24422986
Cites: Behav Ther. 2006 Mar;37(1):25-35 PMID 16942958
Cites: J Anxiety Disord. 2004;18(6):825-39 PMID 15474855
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2014 Jun;34(4):282-97 PMID 24742496
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2012 Aug;32(6):482-95 PMID 22717336
ErratumIn: BMJ Open. 2017 Nov 3;7(11):e016220corr1 PMID 29101154
PubMed ID
28982814 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of cervical, oral, and anal human papillomavirus infection in women living with HIV in Denmark - The SHADE cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299750
Source
J Clin Virol. 2018 08; 105:64-71
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2018
Author
Kristina Thorsteinsson
Merete Storgaard
Terese L Katzenstein
Steen Ladelund
Frederikke F Rönsholt
Isik Somuncu Johansen
Gitte Pedersen
Anne Gaardsting
Lars Nørregård Nielsen
Jesper Bonde
Anne-Mette Lebech
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Electronic address: Kristina.thorsteinsson@regionh.dk.
Source
J Clin Virol. 2018 08; 105:64-71
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anal Canal - virology
Cervix Uteri - virology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Genotype
HIV Infections - complications - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Middle Aged
Mouth - virology
Papillomaviridae - genetics - isolation & purification
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
Women living with HIV (WLWH) have elevated risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) related cancers.
To assess prevalence, distribution and concordance of cervical, oral, and anal HPV infection, and predictors of oral and anal HPV in WLWH in Denmark.
WLWH followed in the Study on HIV, cervical Abnormalities and infections in women in Denmark (SHADE) were enrolled and examined for cervical, oral, and anal HPV infection. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of anal and oral HPV.
A total of 214 of 334 WLWH had sufficient DNA for analysis at all three anatomical sites and were included in analyses. Cervical, oral, and anal high-risk (hr) HPV prevalence were 28.0%, 3.7% and 39.3%. Most frequent i) cervical, ii) oral and iii) anal hrHPV genotypes were i) hrHPV58 (8.4%), 52 (5.1%), 16 (5.1%) and 51 (5.1%); ii) 52 (1.4%) and iii) 51 (9.3%), 58 (8.9%), 16 (7.0%) and 18 (7.0%). Among present cervical, oral, and anal hrHPV genotypes, 6.7%, 12.5% and 17.9% were targeted by the 2-or 4-valent HPV vaccines, whereas 50.0%, 50.0% and 42.9% of hrHPV genotypes were covered by the 9-valent HPV vaccine. Anal HPV infection was predicted by cervical HPV infection (adjusted OR 4.47 (95%CI 2.25-8.89)).
Cervical and anal HPV infection were highly prevalent in WLWH. Non-16/18 hrHPV genotypes were predominant at all anatomical sites. Almost half of all hrHPV infections at the three anatomical sites could have been prevented by childhood/adolescent vaccination with the 9-valent HPV vaccine.
PubMed ID
29906660 View in PubMed
Less detail