Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Cancer survival in Estonian migrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21976
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Aug;51(4):418-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
B. Nilsson
E. Gustavson-Kadaka
T. Hakulinen
T. Aareleid
M. Rahu
T. Dyba
S. Rotstein
Author Affiliation
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Aug;51(4):418-23
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality
Comparative Study
Estonia - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Ovarian Neoplasms - mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To quantify the eventual extra loss of life incurred to cancer patients in Estonia compared with those in Sweden that was possibly attributable to differences in society. DESIGN: Population based survival of cancer patients in Estonia was compared with that of Estonian immigrants to Sweden and that of all cancer patients in Sweden. The cancer sites studied were female breast and ovary, male lung and prostate, and male and female stomach and colon. SETTING: Data on incident cases of cancer were obtained from the population based Swedish and Estonian cancer registries. PARTICIPANTS: Data from Estonian patients in Sweden, Estonian patients in Estonia, and patients from the total Swedish population were included in the study. MAIN RESULTS: Differences in survival among the three populations, controlling for follow-up time and age at diagnosis, were observed in breast, colon, lung, ovarian, and prostate cancers. The survival rates of Estonians living in Sweden and the total population of Sweden were better than that of the Estonians living in Estonia. For cancers of the breast and prostate, the excess mortality in the older age group (75 and above) was much greater in Estonia than in the other populations. CONCLUSIONS: Most differences in cancer survival between Estonian and Swedish populations studied could be attributed to a longer delay in diagnosis, and also to inferior treatment (including access to treatment) in Estonia compared with Sweden. Estonia's lag in socioeconomic development, particularly in its public health organisation and funding, is probably the main source of the differences observed.
PubMed ID
9328550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Drinking water chlorination and cancer-a historical cohort study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22167
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Mar;8(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
M. Koivusalo
E. Pukkala
T. Vartiainen
J J Jaakkola
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Mar;8(2):192-200
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlorine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Drinking
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mutagens - adverse effects - analysis - chemistry
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Water - chemistry
Water Purification - methods
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Chlorination of water rich in organic material is known to produce a complex mixture of organochlorine compounds, including mutagenic and carcinogenic substances. A historical cohort study of 621,431 persons living in 56 towns in Finland was conducted in order to assess the relation between historical exposure to drinking water mutagenicity and cancer. Exposure to quantity of mutagenicity was calculated on the basis of historical information of raw water quality and water treatment practices using an empirical equation relating mutagenicity and raw water pH, KMnO4 value and chlorine dose. Cancer cases were derived from the population-based Finnish Cancer Registry and follow-up time in the study started in 1970. Age, gender, time period, social class, and urban residence were taken into account in Poisson regression analysis of the observed numbers of cases using expected numbers of cases standardized for age and gender as a basis. Excess risks were calculated using a continuous variable for mutagenicity for 3,000 net rev/l exposure representing an average exposure in a town using chlorinated surface water. After adjustment for confounding, a statistically significant excess risk was observed for women in cancers of the bladder (relative risk [RR] = 1.48, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-2.18), rectum (RR = 1.38, CI = 1.03-1.85), esophagus (RR = 1.90, CI = 1.02-3.52), and breast (RR = 1.11, CI = 1.01-1.22). These results support the magnitude of excess risks for rectal and bladder cancers found in earlier epidemiologic studies on chlorination by-products and give additional information on exposure-response concerning the mutagenic compounds. Nevertheless, due to the public health importance of water chlorination, uncertainty related to the magnitude of observed risks, and the fact that excess risks were observed only for women, the results of the study should be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
9134243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of the effect on breast cancer mortality of population based mammography screening programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23603
Source
J Med Screen. 1994 Jul;1(3):184-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
S. Törnberg
J. Carstensen
T. Hakulinen
P. Lenner
T. Hatschek
B. Lundgren
Author Affiliation
Oncologic Centre, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Med Screen. 1994 Jul;1(3):184-7
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
Confidence Intervals
Demography
Female
Humans
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate, by analysis of breast cancer mortality data from all the 26 Swedish counties for the years 1971 to 1990, whether the effect of the introduction of mammography screening in Sweden can be assessed by observation from existing mortality data. METHODS: A Poisson regression model was used to study whether a decrease in breast cancer mortality among women aged 50-74 years was associated with the extent of mammography screening in different counties and periods. RESULTS: In regions where mammography screening had been introduced, breast cancer mortality tended to be decreased, on average, compared with regions without screening. If a 10 year time lag between the start of screening and its full effect on mortality is assumed then the estimated reduction in breast cancer mortality associated with introduction of screening was 19% with a 95% confidence interval ranging from -3% to 37%. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the effect of mammography screening may be studied using existing routine mortality data and appropriate statistical modelling. This way of assessing the outcome of the screening is valuable when continuously monitoring a screening programme that has become a public health routine.
PubMed ID
8790514 View in PubMed
Less detail

Joint effects of different human papillomaviruses and Chlamydia trachomatis infections on risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17765
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 May;40(7):1058-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
T. Luostarinen
M. Lehtinen
T. Bjørge
V. Abeler
M. Hakama
G. Hallmans
E. Jellum
P. Koskela
P. Lenner
A K Lie
J. Paavonen
E. Pukkala
P. Saikku
E. Sigstad
S. Thoresen
L D Youngman
J. Dillner
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Box 169, FIN-00171 Helsinki, Finland. tapio.luostarinen@cancer.fi
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2004 May;40(7):1058-65
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - virology
Case-Control Studies
Cervix Uteri - microbiology - virology
Chlamydia Infections - complications - epidemiology
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - microbiology - virology
Abstract
This case-control study based in Nordic serum banks evaluated the joint effects of infections with genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, and Chlamydia trachomatis in the aetiology of cervical squamous cell carcinoma. Through a linkage with the cancer registries, 144 cases were identified and 420 controls matched to them. Exposure to past infections was defined by the presence of specific IgG antibodies. The odds ratio (OR) for the second-order interaction of HPV16, HPV6/11 and C. trachomatis was small (1.0) compared to the expected multiplicative OR, 57, and the additive OR, 11. The interactions were not materially different among HPV16 DNA-positive squamous cell carcinomas. When HPV16 was replaced with HPV18/33 in the analysis of second-order interactions with HPV6/11 and C. trachomatis, there was no evidence of interaction, the joint effect being close to the expected additive OR. Possible explanations for the observed antagonism include misclassification, selection bias or a true biological phenomenon with HPV6/11 and C. trachomatis exposures antagonizing the carcinogenic effects of HPV16.
PubMed ID
15093583 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term survival of 1986 patients with intracranial meningioma diagnosed from 1953 to 1984 in Finland. Comparison of the observed and expected survival rates in a population-based series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223077
Source
Cancer. 1992 Sep 15;70(6):1568-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1992
Author
R. Sankila
M. Kallio
J. Jääskeläinen
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer. 1992 Sep 15;70(6):1568-76
Date
Sep-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Meningeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Meningioma - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Middle Aged
Registries
Regression Analysis
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Intracranial meningioma was diagnosed and histologically verified in 1986 patients, 597 men and 1389 women, between 1953 and 1984 in Finland. The closing date of this survival study was December 31, 1987, and the follow-up was complete. Meningiomas, usually slowly growing and surgically curable benign tumors, caused considerable short-term mortality, with a relative survival rate (RSR) of 83% at 1 year, and slight but continual long-term mortality, with RSR of 71% at 15 years. From 1979 to 1984, when computed tomography (CT) was available, the mortality at 3 months for the patients who had surgical procedures was 2% in those younger than 45 years and 10% in those older than 64 years; patients who did not have operations had 1-year mortality of 61%. The short-term and long-term excess mortalities are associated significantly with old age, no surgical procedure, and the period of diagnosis; the long-term excess mortality also is associated with male gender.
Notes
Erratum In: Cancer 1993 Feb 15;71(4):1394
PubMed ID
1516008 View in PubMed
Less detail

Measuring social class differences in cancer patient survival: is it necessary to control for social class differences in general population mortality? A Finnish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201594
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Nov;52(11):727-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
P W Dickman
A. Auvinen
E T Voutilainen
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Nov;52(11):727-34
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Regression Analysis
Social Class
Survival Rate
Abstract
Estimation of cancer patient survival by social class has been performed using observed, corrected (cause specific), and relative (with expected survival based on the national population) survival rates. Each of these measures are potentially biased and the optimal method is to calculate relative survival rates using social class specific death rates to estimate expected survival. This study determined the degree to which the choice of survival measure affects the estimation of social class differences in cancer patient survival.
All Finnish residents diagnosed with at least one of 10 common malignant neoplasms during the period 1977-1985 were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry and followed up for deaths to the end of 1992.
Survival rates were calculated by site, sex, and age at 5, 10, and 15 years subsequent to diagnosis for each of three measures of survival; relative survival, corrected (cause specific) survival, and relative survival adjusted for social class differences in general mortality. Regression models were fitted to each set of rates for the first five years of follow up.
The degree of variation in relative survival resulting from social class decreased, although did not disappear, after controlling for social class differences in general mortality. The results obtained using corrected survival were close to those obtained using relative survival with a social class correction. The differences between the three measures were largest when the proportion of deaths from other causes was large, for example, in cancers with high survival, among older patients, and for longer follow up times.
Although each of the three measures gave comparable results, it is recommended that relative survival rates are used with expected survival adjusted for social class when studying social class variation in cancer patient survival. If this is not an available option, it is recommended that corrected survival rates are used. Relative survival rates without the social class correction overestimate social class differences and should be used with caution.
Notes
Cites: Cancer. 1977 Feb;39(2):467-77837332
Cites: Cancer. 1985 Jul 1;56(1):210-74005791
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1982;35(8):675-837096531
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1984;37(3):183-936699124
Cites: Med J Aust. 1984 Nov 24;141(11):705-96094994
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1985 Aug;75(2):207-173860679
Cites: Comput Programs Biomed. 1985;19(2-3):197-2073839736
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1986 Dec;76(12):1400-33777285
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(9):857-643597687
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1987 Sep;41(3):204-93443812
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1988 Jun;42(2):138-433221162
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1988;10:87-1213066632
Cites: Cancer. 1990 Aug 15;66(4):819-262386909
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1990 Dec;44(4):265-702277246
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1990 Dec;44(4):293-62277250
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 1991;(95):159-761894319
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1991 Jun;20(2):339-451917232
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1991;44(8):807-151941032
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Jan 18;304(6820):165-81637372
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Mar 15;135(6):609-181580237
Cites: Cancer. 1992 Jul 15;70(2):402-91617590
Cites: Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1969 Feb;59(2):267-745812928
Cites: Jpn J Clin Oncol. 1992 Aug;22(4):270-71434026
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1993 Feb;67(2):351-78431365
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Jul 8;329(2):103-98510686
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Oct;83(10):1425-88214232
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1993 Dec;47(6):491-68120506
Cites: Med Clin (Barc). 1994 Feb 5;102(4):129-358121199
Cites: Acta Oncol. 1994;33(4):365-98018367
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Oct 22;344(8930):1120-47934494
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Oct;48(5):441-67964352
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1994 Aug;47(8):903-97730894
Cites: Cancer. 1995 Jun 15;75(12):2946-537773946
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1995 Sep;72(3):738-437669587
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Nov 15;142(10):1089-1027485054
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1995 Nov 3;63(3):324-97591225
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 1995 Sep;31A(10):1660-47488421
Cites: Milbank Q. 1996;74(2):215-388632735
Cites: Cancer. 1995 Nov 15;76(10):1687-88625034
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Sep 11;276(10):792-78769588
Cites: Cancer. 1955 Nov-Dec;8(6):1126-913270227
Cites: Proc Staff Meet Mayo Clin. 1950 May 24;25(11):270-8615417650
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1970 Aug;23(2):105-155455352
Cites: Cancer. 1985 Apr 1;55(7):1552-53978549
Cites: Br Med Bull. 1984 Oct;40(4):309-146398099
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1985 Mar;39(1):1-83989429
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Mar;71(3):242-507468855
PubMed ID
10396505 View in PubMed
Less detail

Mixture models for cancer survival analysis: application to population-based data with covariates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202928
Source
Stat Med. 1999 Feb 28;18(4):441-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1999
Author
R. De Angelis
R. Capocaccia
T. Hakulinen
B. Soderman
A. Verdecchia
Author Affiliation
Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Roma, Italy.
Source
Stat Med. 1999 Feb 28;18(4):441-54
Date
Feb-28-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biometry
Colonic Neoplasms - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life expectancy
Likelihood Functions
Probability
Registries
Regression Analysis
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The interest in estimating the probability of cure has been increasing in cancer survival analysis as the curability of many cancer diseases is becoming a reality. Mixture survival models provide a way of modelling time to death when cure is possible, simultaneously estimating death hazard of fatal cases and the proportion of cured case. In this paper we propose an application of a parametric mixture model to relative survival rates of colon cancer patients from the Finnish population-based cancer registry, and including major survival determinants as explicative covariates. Disentangling survival into two different components greatly facilitates the analysis and the interpretation of the role of prognostic factors on survival patterns. For example, age plays a different role in determining, from one side, the probability of cure, and, from the other side, the life expectancy of fatal cases. The results support the hypothesis that observed survival trends are really due to a real prognostic gain for more recently diagnosed patients.
PubMed ID
10070685 View in PubMed
Less detail

A population-based study on the incidence and survival rates of 3857 glioma patients diagnosed from 1953 to 1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225686
Source
Cancer. 1991 Sep 15;68(6):1394-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1991
Author
M. Kallio
R. Sankila
J. Jääskeläinen
S. Karjalainen
T. Hakulinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Cancer. 1991 Sep 15;68(6):1394-400
Date
Sep-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glioma - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Regression Analysis
Survival Rate
Abstract
Intracranial glioma was diagnosed during the patient's life and histologically verified in 3857 patients between 1953 and 1984 in Finland. Their survival up to the end of 1987 was analyzed, the follow-up being complete. The treatment was by operation in 1193 cases, radiation in 459 cases, both operation and radiation in 1486 cases, and neither operation nor radiation in 719 cases. The 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, and 15-year cumulative relative survival rates were 0.53, 0.29, 0.20, and 0.18, respectively. The newborn to 14-year-olds lost 56% of their life expectancy; the 15-year-olds to 44-year-olds, 71%; the 45-year-olds to 64-year-olds, 88%; and the 65-year-olds to 99-year-olds, 91%. According to the model with the best fit in regression analysis the prognosis was significantly better among young, recently diagnosed patients who had undergone both operation and radiation.
PubMed ID
1873791 View in PubMed
Less detail

The survival pattern in male breast cancer. An analysis of 1429 patients from the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25447
Source
Cancer. 1989 Sep 15;64(6):1177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-1989
Author
H O Adami
T. Hakulinen
M. Ewertz
S. Tretli
L. Holmberg
S. Karjalainen
Author Affiliation
Swedish Cancer Registry, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm.
Source
Cancer. 1989 Sep 15;64(6):1177-82
Date
Sep-15-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Denmark
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prognosis
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
A joint Nordic study was conducted to elucidate the survival pattern in male breast cancer by means of regression analysis of annual relative survival rates. A total of 1429 (98.4%) of all patients diagnosed during a 25-year to 30-year period and reported to the Nordic cancer registries were available for follow-up through 1982. The relative survival rate was lower in older patients; the relative excess risk of dying (from breast cancer) during the first 5 years of observation, calculated by multiple regression modelling, increased in a regular fashion more than three-fold from patients younger than 40 years at diagnosis to those aged 80 years or older. Significantly lower rates were found among males in Denmark and Finland, the relative excess risks of dying (compared with Sweden) being 1.39 (1.06-1.80) and 1.73 (1.22-2.45), respectively, during the first 5 years. The authors concluded first that important differences exist between male and female patients with breast cancer in the relation between survival and age at diagnosis, and secondly that a later stage at presentation or national differences in the natural history are the most likely explanations for the worse prognosis in Denmark and Finland.
PubMed ID
2766215 View in PubMed
Less detail

Thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for skin hemangioma in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23459
Source
Radiat Res. 1994 Dec;140(3):334-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
M. Lundell
T. Hakulinen
L E Holm
Author Affiliation
Department of Hospital Physics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Radiat Res. 1994 Dec;140(3):334-9
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemangioma - radiotherapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Radium - adverse effects
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Sweden
Thyroid Neoplasms - etiology
Abstract
A Swedish cohort of 14,351 infants exposed to ionizing radiation for skin hemangioma was analyzed with respect to thyroid cancer risk. The subjects were irradiated during the period 1920-1959 and radiotherapy was given with beta particles, gamma rays and/or X rays. The mean absorbed dose to the thyroid was 0.26 Gy (range
PubMed ID
7972685 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.