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Adverse effects on risk of ischaemic heart disease of adding sugar to hot beverages in hypertensives using diuretics. A six year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11267
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Righospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Blood Press. 1996 Mar;5(2):91-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Coffee
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tea
Abstract
Non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and essential hypertension (EH) are two of several manifestations of the insulin resistance syndrome. Although subjects with NIDDM and subjects with EH share a common defect in carbohydrate metabolism, only diabetics are advised to avoid sugar. We tested the theory that an adverse effect of diuretics treatment in men with EH with respect to risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) would depend on the intake of dietary sugar using sugar in hot beverages as a marker. The cohort consisted of 2,899 men from the Copenhagen Male Study aged 53-74 years (mean 63) who were without overt cardiovascular disease. Potential confounders were: age, alcohol,smoking, physical activity, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipids, cotinine, NIDDM,and social class. A total of 340 men took antihypertensives; 211 took diuretics (95% thiazides and related agents), and 129 used other antihypertensives. During 6 years, 179 men (6.2%) had a first IHD event. Among the 340 men taking antihypertensives, the incidence rate was 11%. Diuretics use was associated with a high risk of IHD in hypertensive men with a relatively high intake of dietary sugar; the cumulative incidence rate was 22%; in diuretics treated men with a low intake of sugar, the rate was 7%. After controlling for potential confounders, relative risk (95% ci.) was 3.1(1.3-7.6), p = 001. Among the 129 men who took other forms of antihypertensive drugs, the IHD incidence rate was 8%, and independent of the intake of sugar. The results indicate that the risk of IHD in hypertensives using diuretics is associated with intake of dietary sugar, which may explain at least some of the discouraging effects of antihypertensive agents on the reduction of risk of IHD.
PubMed ID
8860097 View in PubMed
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Cross-sectional study of health effects of cryolite production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67967
Source
J Soc Occup Med. 1989;39(4):133-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
H. Friis
J. Clausen
F. Gyntelberg
Source
J Soc Occup Med. 1989;39(4):133-5
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - poisoning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects
Fluoride Poisoning - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
A cross-sectional health study of 101 cryolite workers was performed, using spirometry and a questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the index of smoking and a decrease in FEV1 (per cent). There was no significant correlation between work-related exposure and lung function. Many cryolite workers described a group of symptoms appearing after 15 to 30 min of heavy dust exposure: nausea, followed by epigastric pain with relief after spontaneous or provoked vomiting. Thirty-four (33.6 per cent) workers complained of nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea in relation to work, compared to 3.8 per cent of 1752 men participating in the Copenhagen Male Study.
PubMed ID
2622142 View in PubMed
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Determinants of long-term neuropsychological symptoms. The Danish Gulf War Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52517
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Nov;46(5):423-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
P. Suadicani
T. Ishøy
B. Guldager
M. Appleyard
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, København NV.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1999 Nov;46(5):423-7
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Military Personnel
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Persian Gulf Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Compared with controls, up to six years after their return, Danish Gulf War Veterans have a significantly higher prevalence of self-reported neuropsychological symptoms. Independent associations are found for concentration or memory problems, repeated fits of headache, balance disturbances or fits of dizziness, abnormal fatigue not caused by physical activity, and problems sleeping all night. We investigated whether psychosocial, physical, chemical or biological exposures were associated with these symptoms. METHODOLOGY: This study is a prevalence study using retrospective data on exposure. Some 686 subjects who had been deployed in the Persian Gulf within the period August 2 1990 until December 31 1997 were included; the control group comprised 257 subjects matched according to age, gender and profession. All participants underwent clinical and paraclinical examinations, and were interviewed by a physician based on a completed questionnaire. RESULTS: A clustering of three to five of the above symptoms were found in 21.4% of Gulf War Veterans vs. 6.2% in controls, p
PubMed ID
10605622 View in PubMed
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Disruptive behavior in childhood and socioeconomic position in adulthood: a prospective study over 27 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120832
Source
Int J Public Health. 2013 Apr;58(2):247-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Saija Alatupa
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Mirka Hintsanen
Marko Elovainio
Sari Mullola
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Author Affiliation
IBS, Unit of Personality, Work and Health Psychology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, 00014, Helsinki, Finland. saija.alatupa@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Public Health. 2013 Apr;58(2):247-56
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression
Child
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Psychomotor Agitation
Regression Analysis
Social Adjustment
Social Class
Social Mobility
Abstract
We examined whether childhood disruptive behavior (aggressiveness, hyperactivity and social adjustment), predicts adulthood socioeconomic position (SEP), i.e., educational level, occupational status and income and social mobility.
Social mobility was defined by comparing the participants' adulthood socioeconomic position with that of their parents ("intergenerational social mobility"). The subjects were derived from a population-based cohort study (N = 3,600) and our sample consisted of 782 participants (403 women) aged 3-9 years at baseline and were followed until they were aged 30-36.
High childhood aggression associated with low educational level and occupational status suggesting an early beginning negative tracking of aggressive behavior. High hyperactivity and poor social adjustment predicted adulthood low occupational status proposing a more slow effect on adulthood SEP. No associations between disruptive behavior and income-related mobility were found, but high hyperactivity associated with educational downward drift, whereas high aggression and low social adjustment related with occupational downward drift.
Results suggest that childhood disruptive behavior may have long-lasting negative effects. In order to reduce the adverse effects of disruptive behavior, early intervention of problematic behavior becomes salient.
PubMed ID
22965635 View in PubMed
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Do psychological attributes matter for adherence to antihypertensive medication? The Finnish Public Sector Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154722
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;26(11):2236-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Hermann Nabi
Jussi Vahtera
Archana Singh-Manoux
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
David Gimeno
Marko Elovainio
Marianna Virtanen
Timo Klaukka
Mika Kivimaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. H.Nabi@public-health.ucl.ac.uk
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Nov;26(11):2236-43
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Treatment Refusal - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Psychological factors may be important determinants of adherence to antihypertensive medication, as they have been repeatedly found to be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and health-damaging behaviours. We examined the importance of several psychological attributes (sense of coherence, optimism, pessimism, hostility, anxiety) with regard to antihypertensive medication adherence assessed by pharmacy refill records.
A total of 1021 hypertensive participants, aged 26-63 years, who were employees in eight towns and 12 hospitals in Finland were included in the analyses.
We found 60% of patients to be totally adherent, 36% partially adherent, and 4% totally nonadherent. Multinomial regression analyses revealed high sense of coherence to be associated with lower odds of being totally nonadherent in contrast of being totally adherent (odds ratio=0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.96). This association was independent of factors that influenced adherence to antihypertensive medication, such as sociodemographic characteristics, health-related behaviours, self-reported medical history of doctor-diagnosed comorbidity, and anteriority of hypertension status. The association was not specific to certain types of antihypertensive drugs.
High sense of coherence may influence antihypertensive medication-adherence behaviour. Aspects characterizing this psychological attribute, such as knowledge (comprehensibility), capacity (manageability), and motivation (meaningfulness) may be important determinants of adherence behaviour for asymptomatic illnesses, such as hypertension, in which patients often do not feel or perceive the immediate consequences of skipping medication doses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18854766 View in PubMed
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Exposure to cold and draught, alcohol consumption, and the NS-phenotype are associated with chronic bronchitis: an epidemiological investigation of 3387 men aged 53-75 years: the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10297
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Mar;58(3):160-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
H W Meyer
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
H:S Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. poul.suadicani@jubiipost.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2001 Mar;58(3):160-4
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Cold - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory - immunology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study was performed to estimate the strength of association between chronic bronchitis and lifetime exposure to occupational factors, current lifestyle, and the NS-phenotype in the MNS blood group among middle aged and elderly men. METHODS: The study was carried out within the frameworks of the Copenhagen Male Study. Of 3387 men 3331 men with a mean age of 63 (range 53-75) years could be classified by prevalence of chronic bronchitis. As well as the completion of a large questionnaire on health, lifestyle, and working conditions, all participants had a thorough examination, including measurements of height and weight and blood pressure and a venous blood sample was taken for the measurement of serum cotinine and MNS typing; 16.5% of the men had the NS-phenotype. Chronic bronchitis was defined as cough and phlegm lasting 3 months or more for at least 2 years; 14.6% had chronic bronchitis. RESULTS: Smoking and smoke inhalation were the factors most strongly associated with prevalence of chronic bronchitis. There were three major new findings: (a) long term (>5 years) occupational exposure to cold and draught was associated with a significantly increased prevalence of chronic bronchitis; compared with others, and adjusted for confounders, the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was 1.4 (1.1 to 1.7), p=0.004; (b) a significant J shaped association existed between alcohol use and bronchitis, p
PubMed ID
11171928 View in PubMed
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Ischaemic heart disease incidence by social class and form of smoking: the Copenhagen Male Study--17 years' follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11877
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 May;231(5):477-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
H O Hein
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 May;231(5):477-83
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Exertion
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Social Class
Time Factors
Abstract
The Copenhagen Male Study is a prospective, cardiovascular cohort study initiated in 1970 and consisting of 5249 employed men aged 40-59 years. A total of 4710 men, who had reported their smoking habits and were free of ischaemic heart disease, had their mortality recorded over a 17-year period: 585 men suffered a first incident of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), and 248 cases were fatal. There was a strong social gradient in the risk of IHD (Kendall's Tau B = 0.12, P less than 0.001). Adjusting for age, blood pressure, physical activity, body mass index and alcohol consumption in a multiple logistic regression equation, men in the lowest social class had a relative risk (95% confidence interval) of IHD of 3.6 (2.5-5.3) compared to men in the highest social class. We determined whether differences in smoking habits could explain at least some of this large increase in risk. Adjustment for the above factors and also inclusion of the form of tobacco smoked, the amount of tobacco smoked and presence or absence of inhalation, had very little effect on the estimate: the relative risk was 3.5 (2.4-5.2). There was no social gradient in age at the start of smoking. According to smoking habits, comparing social class V with social class I, the relative risk was 7.7 (2.6-22.4) in cigarette smokers, 6.0 (1.1-32.1) in pipe smokers, 3.5 (1.7-7.1) in mixed smokers, 2.25 (0.4-12.9) in cheroot smokers, 3.8 (2.4-5.9) in all smokers, 1.95 (0.8-4.6) in ex-smokers, and 4.7 (1.01-22.2) in non-smokers. In the upper social classes, 50-75% of IHD events could be ascribed to smoking, and in the lowest classes only about 20%. We conclude that the substantial social inequalities in risk of ischaemic heart disease are not accounted for by differences in smoking habits.
PubMed ID
1602285 View in PubMed
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Living alone and antidepressant medication use: a prospective study in a working-age population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125884
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Mika Kivimäki
Kirsi Ahola
Kaisla Joutsenniemi
Marko Elovainio
Helena Rossi
Sampsa Puttonen
Seppo Koskinen
Erkki Isometsä
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 00250 Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:236
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Drug Utilization
Educational Status
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Psychosocial Deprivation
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
An increasing proportion of the population lives in one-person households. The authors examined whether living alone predicts the use of antidepressant medication and whether socioeconomic, psychosocial, or behavioral factors explain this association.
The participants were a nationally representative sample of working-age Finns from the Health 2000 Study, totaling 1695 men and 1776 women with a mean age of 44.6 years. In the baseline survey in 2000, living arrangements (living alone vs. not) and potential explanatory factors, including psychosocial factors (social support, work climate, hostility), sociodemographic factors (occupational grade, education, income, unemployment, urbanicity, rental living, housing conditions), and health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, obesity), were measured. Antidepressant medication use was followed up from 2000 to 2008 through linkage to national prescription registers.
Participants living alone had a 1.81-fold (CI = 1.46-2.23) higher purchase rate of antidepressants during the follow-up period than those who did not live alone. Adjustment for sociodemographic factors attenuated this association by 21% (adjusted OR = 1.64, CI = 1.32-2.05). The corresponding attenuation was 12% after adjustment for psychosocial factors (adjusted OR = 1.71, CI = 1.38-2.11) and 9% after adjustment for health behaviors (adjusted OR = 1.74, CI = 1.41-2.14). Gender-stratified analyses showed that in women the greatest attenuation was related to sociodemographic factors and in men to psychosocial factors.
These data suggest that people living alone may be at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The public health value is in recognizing that people who live alone are more likely to have material and psychosocial problems that may contribute to excess mental health problems in this population group.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22443226 View in PubMed
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Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1994 Sep;44(4):217-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
P. Suadicani
K. Hansen
A M Fenger
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Rigshospitalet, State University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1994 Sep;44(4):217-21
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Steel
Abstract
The association between low back pain and occupational work loads, lifestyle factors and socio-demographic factors was examined in 469 steelplant workers (436 men, 33 women), aged 40 +/- 12 years (mean +/- SD). Fifty-one per cent had experienced low back pain during the preceding year. The strongest associations were found between recent low back pain and domestic recreational activities (> or = 3 h/week vs. 0-2 h/week), and between recent low back pain and work pace (too fast vs. adequate), with odds ratios (95% confidence limits) of 3.0 (1.5-5.8) and 2.3 (1.2-4.2), respectively. We considered a subject to have a particularly severe history of low back pain if, due to low back trouble, he (i) had ever been admitted to a hospital, (ii) had ever had to change work, or (iii) had had more than one week's accumulated sick leave during the preceding year. There was a strong association between a severe low back pain history and lifetime occupational exposure to heavy and frequent lifting at work. Forty-seven per cent of severe low back pain events could be ascribed to heavy and frequent lifting, assuming the associations were causal. We conclude that domestic recreational activities may be an important potential confounder in studies on occupational risk factors for low back pain, and that, based on the results of this and of other studies, a case for prevention still seems to exist regarding lifting of heavy burdens in the work environment.
PubMed ID
7949066 View in PubMed
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Neighborhood effects in depressive symptoms, social support, and mistrust: Longitudinal analysis with repeated measurements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269391
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Jul;136-137:10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Jaakko Airaksinen
Christian Hakulinen
Marko Elovainio
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Markus Jokela
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Jul;136-137:10-6
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - etiology
Employment
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Rural Population
Social Class
Social Support
Trust
Urban Population
Abstract
While many associations between neighborhood characteristics and individual well-being have been reported, there is a lack of longitudinal studies that could provide evidence for or against causal interpretations of neighborhood effects. This study examined whether neighborhood urbanicity and socioeconomic status were associated with within-individual variation in depression, mistrust and social support when individuals were living in different neighborhoods with different levels of urbanicity and socioeconomic status. Participants were from the Young Finns prospective cohort study (N = 3074) with five repeated measurement times in 1992, 1997, 2001, 2007, and 2011. Neighborhood urbanicity and socioeconomic status were measured at the level of municipalities and zip-code areas. Within-individual variation over time was examined with multilevel regression, which adjusted the models for all stable individual differences that might confound associations between neighborhood characteristics and individual well-being. Social support from friends was higher in urban areas and in areas with higher socioeconomic status, whereas social support from the family was higher in rural areas. These associations were observed also in the within-individual analyses, and they were partly accounted for by employment and socioeconomic status of the participants. There were no associations between neighborhood characteristics and depression or mistrust. These findings suggest that people receive less support from their families and more support from their friends when living in urban compared to rural regions of Finland. These differences are partly explained by people's changing socioeconomic and employment statuses.
PubMed ID
25974137 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.