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Health-related quality of life by disease and socio-economic group in the general population in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46142
Source
Health Policy. 2001 Jan;55(1):51-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
K. Burström
M. Johannesson
F. Diderichsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka, SE-171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. kristina.burstrom@smd.sll.se
Source
Health Policy. 2001 Jan;55(1):51-69
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL) on population level, is becoming increasingly important for priority setting in health policy. In the health economics field, it is common to measure HRQoL in terms of health-state utilities or QoL weights. This study investigates the feasibility of obtaining mean QoL weights by mapping survey data to the generic HRQoL measure EQ-5D and to describe the HRQoL in terms of mean QoL weights in certain disease and socio-economic groups. Data from the 1996-1997 Survey of Living Conditions, interviews with a representative sample (16-84 years) of the Swedish population (n=11 698) were used. The mean QoL weight decreased from 0.91 among the youngest to 0.61 among the oldest, and was lower for women than for men. The QoL weight was 0.88 in the highest socio-economic group and 0.78 in the lowest socio-economic group. The QoL weight was lowest (0.38) among persons with depression and highest among persons with hypertension (0.71). The QoL weight decreased from 0.95 for persons with very good global self-rated health to 0.20 for persons with very poor global self-rated health. The results support the feasibility and validity of the mapping approach. HRQoL varies greatly between socio-economic groups and different disease groups.
PubMed ID
11137188 View in PubMed
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The impact of age on the cost-effectiveness of hypertension treatment: an analysis of randomized drug trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54878
Source
Med Decis Making. 1994 Jul-Sep;14(3):236-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Johannesson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
Source
Med Decis Making. 1994 Jul-Sep;14(3):236-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis - methods - standards
Drug Therapy - economics
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Randomized Controlled Trials - standards
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Value of Life
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether any consistent pattern exists with respect to the cost-effectiveness of hypertension treatment and age, based on the results of randomized drug trials. Data about age, entry diastolic blood pressure, and relative risks of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke from 19 randomized trials were used to derive point estimates of the cost-effectiveness of each trial. The relationship between age and cost per life-year gained was then estimated by regression analysis, controlling for entry diastolic blood pressure. The regression analysis shows a statistically significant average decrease in the cost per life-year gained of about SEK 15,000 per year of older age for both men and women ($1 = SEK 6). Sensitivity analysis showed that the improvement in cost-effectiveness with age was stable towards various assumptions, but that the magnitude of the improvement varied greatly with the discount rate. Based on the results of randomized drug trials, it is concluded that the cost-effectiveness of hypertension treatment improves with patient age for both men and women.
PubMed ID
7934710 View in PubMed
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Income-related inequality in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72015
Source
J Health Econ. 2000 Nov;19(6):1007-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
U G Gerdtham
M. Johannesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden. heug@hhs.se
Source
J Health Econ. 2000 Nov;19(6):1007-26
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Regression Analysis
Social Justice
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We estimate the income-related inequality in Sweden with respect to life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). We use a large data set from Sweden with over 40,000 individuals followed up for 10-16 years, to estimate the survival and quality-adjusted survival in different income groups. For both life-years and QALYs, we discover inequalities in health favouring the higher income groups. For men (women) in the youngest age-group (20-29 years), the number of QALYs is 43.7 (45.7) in the lowest income decile and 47.2 (49.0) in the highest income decile.
PubMed ID
11186842 View in PubMed
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Is the valuation of a QALY gained independent of age? Some empirical evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72689
Source
J Health Econ. 1997 Oct;16(5):589-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997

Predictors of deterioration of lung function in cystic fibrosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31578
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2002 Jun;33(6):483-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
C. Schaedel
I. de Monestrol
L. Hjelte
M. Johannesson
R. Kornfält
A. Lindblad
B. Strandvik
L. Wahlgren
L. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. Charlotta.Schaedel@skane.se
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2002 Jun;33(6):483-91
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alleles
Child
Child, Preschool
Cystic Fibrosis - microbiology - physiopathology - surgery
Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator - genetics
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Transplantation
Male
Mutation
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The severity of lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) may be related to the type of mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and to environmental and immunological factors. Since pulmonary disease is the main determinant of morbidity and mortality in CF, it is important to identify factors that can explain and predict this variation. The aim of this longitudinal study of the whole Swedish CF population over age 7 years was to correlate genetic and clinical data with the rate of decline in pulmonary function. The statistical analysis was performed using the mixed model regression method, supplemented with calculation of relative risks for severe lung disease in age cohorts.The severity of pulmonary disease was to some extent predicted by CFTR genotype. Furthermore, the present investigation is the first long-term study showing a significantly more rapid deterioration of lung function in patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus. Besides diabetes mellitus, pancreatic insufficiency and chronic Pseudomonas colonization were found to be negative predictors of pulmonary function. In contrast to several other reports, we found no significant differences in lung function between genders. Patients with pancreatic sufficiency have no or only a slight decline of lung function with age once treatment is started, but an early diagnosis in this group is desirable.
PubMed ID
12001283 View in PubMed
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Swedish population health-related quality of life results using the EQ-5D.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15413
Source
Qual Life Res. 2001;10(7):621-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K. Burström
M. Johannesson
F. Diderichsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. kristina.burstrom@smd.sll.se
Source
Qual Life Res. 2001;10(7):621-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Disabled Persons
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measured on population level may be useful to guide policies for health. This study aims to describe the HRQoL; in EQ-5D dimensions, mean rating scale (RS) scores and mean EQ-5D index values, in the general population, by certain disease and socio-economic groups, in Stockholm County 1998. The EQ-5D self-classifier and a RS were included in the 1998 cross-sectional postal Stockholm County public health survey to a representative sample (n = 4950, 20-88 years), 63% response rate. Mean RS score ranged from 0.90 (20-29 years) to 0.69 (80-88 years), mean EQ-5D index value ranged from 0.89 (20-29 years) to 0.74 (80-88 years). For different diseases mean RS scores ranged from 0.80 (asthma) to 0.69 (angina pectoris), mean EQ-5D index values ranged from 0.79 (asthma) to 0.66 (low back pain). The mean health state scores (RS and EQ-5D index) were 0.06 lower in the unskilled manual group than in the higher non-manual group after controlling for age and sex (p
PubMed ID
11822795 View in PubMed
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Willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy--further results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221465
Source
J Health Econ. 1993 Apr;12(1):95-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
M. Johannesson
P O Johansson
B. Kriström
U G Gerdtham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
Source
J Health Econ. 1993 Apr;12(1):95-108
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Fees, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - economics - therapy
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Volition
Abstract
A measurement experiment regarding willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy is reported. A new type of binary willingness to pay question is used, that allows for different degrees of certainty with respect to the responses. Mean willingness to pay is derived from a simple expected utility model and estimated using maximum likelihood methods. The estimated parameters are highly significant, with predicted signs, and imply a mean willingness to pay of about SEK 800 ($130) per month. The explanatory power of the equation that only includes 'certain' yes/no responses is, as expected, much higher than that of the equation where only 'uncertain' responses are included.
PubMed ID
10126492 View in PubMed
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Willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy--results of a Swedish pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227833
Source
J Health Econ. 1991;10(4):461-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M. Johannesson
B. Jönsson
L. Borgquist
Author Affiliation
Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
Source
J Health Econ. 1991;10(4):461-73
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Consumer Participation - economics - statistics & numerical data
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - economics - therapy
Life expectancy
Logistic Models
Models, Econometric
Office Visits - economics
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Value of Life
Abstract
In this methodological study the results of a Swedish pilot study about willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy are presented. The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of the contingent valuation (CV) method in this area. Open-ended and discrete CV questions were compared in a mail questionnaire. The open-ended CV question did not work well. The answers to the discrete question, analysed by logistic regression analysis, indicated a willingness to pay in the range SEK 2500-5000 per year for antihypertensive therapy. Further studies should be undertaken to explore the reliability and the validity of the CV method.
PubMed ID
10117014 View in PubMed
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Willingness to pay for reduced incontinence symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72677
Source
Br J Urol. 1997 Oct;80(4):557-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
M. Johannesson
R M O'Conor
G. Kobelt-Nguyen
A. Mattiasson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
Source
Br J Urol. 1997 Oct;80(4):557-62
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urinary Retention - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To measure the willingness to pay for a reduction in the number of micturitions and urinary leakages for patients with urge incontinence. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire with a binary willingness-to-pay question was administered to 541 patients in Sweden with urge or mixed incontinence; 461 questionnaires were returned. The reduction in micturitions and urinary leakages valued in the willingness-to-pay question was varied randomly between 25% and 50% in two different subsamples. Information was also collected about the number of micturitions and urinary leakage, health-related quality of life and socio-economic characteristics of the patients in the study. RESULTS: Quality of life was significantly related to the severity of the symptoms and was worse than that of the sex- and age-matched general Swedish population. The median (mean) willingness to pay per month was 240 (530) Swedish krona (SEK, 1 Pound = SEK 11.50) for a 25% reduction in micturitions and leakages and SEK 470 (1030) for a 50% reduction in micturitions and leakages. As hypothesized, the willingness to pay was significantly related to the size of the reduction in micturitions and leakages, the initial number of micturitions and leakages, and income. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with incontinence problems are willing to pay substantial amounts for a reduction in the number of micturitions and leakages.
PubMed ID
9352692 View in PubMed
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Willingness to pay for reductions in angina pectoris attacks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54635
Source
Med Decis Making. 1996 Jul-Sep;16(3):248-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Kartman
F. Andersson
M. Johannesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Med Decis Making. 1996 Jul-Sep;16(3):248-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angina Pectoris - economics - prevention & control
Bias (epidemiology)
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation - economics - methods
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
To compare the costs of health care programs, with the benefits, the values of changes in health status must be expressed in monetary terms. The development of methods to estimate willingness to pay for changes in health status is therefore of interest. This paper reports the results of a contingent valuation study measuring willingness to pay for reductions in angina pectoris attacks. An innovative study design allowed analysis on the data on willingness to pay using two approaches, a binary question and a bidding-game technique. Percentage reductions in anginal attacks were varied randomly in different subsamples, and data were collected about angina pectoris status, attack rate, and income to test the internal validity of the contingent valuation method. Willingness to pay for a 50% reduction in the attack rate for three months was estimated to be about SEK 2,500 ($345) with the binary approach, and about SEK 2,100 ($290) using the bidding-game technique. Regression analyses showed that income, angina pectoris status, attack rate, and percentage reduction in attack rate were all related to willingness to pay, in agreement with the authors' hypothesis.
PubMed ID
8818123 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.