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Fish consumption and polyunsaturated fatty acids in relation to psychological distress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145406
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):494-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Anna Liisa Suominen-Taipale
Anu W Turunen
Timo Partonen
Jaakko Kaprio
Satu Männistö
Jukka Montonen
Antti Jula
Pekka Tiittanen
Pia K Verkasalo
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Department of Environmental Health, Kuopio, Finland. liisa.suominen-taipale@thl.fi
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;39(2):494-503
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Seafood
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
It has been suggested that high fish consumption improves mental well-being. The aim of this study was to assess whether high fish consumption or omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake was associated with reduced self-reported psychological distress.
We used three cross-sectional data sets, the nationwide Health 2000 Survey (n = 5840), the Fishermen Study on Finnish fishermen and their family members (n = 1282) and the Finntwin16 Study on young adults (n = 4986). Data were based on self-administered questionnaires, interviews, health examinations and blood samples. Psychological distress was measured using the 12-item and 21-item General Health Questionnaires (GHQs). Fish consumption was measured by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ, g/day) and independent frequency questions (times/month). Dietary intake (g/day) and serum concentrations (% from fatty acids) of PUFAs were determined. Relationships were analysed using regression analysis.
Regardless of the measure, fish consumption and omega-3 PUFA dietary intake were not associated with distress in any of the data sets. In contrast to the hypothesis, high serum docosahexaenoic acid was associated with high distress in the Fisherman Study men. Some non-linear associations were detected between serum omega-3 PUFAs or fish consumption (times/month) and distress. In the Fishermen Study, the associations were modified by alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity.
Our results do not support the hypothesis that fish consumption or omega-3 PUFA intake are associated with reduced psychological distress in the general population or in a population with high fish consumption.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20156998 View in PubMed
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Force platform balance measures as predictors of indoor and outdoor falls in community-dwelling women aged 63-76 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158516
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008 Feb;63(2):171-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Satu Pajala
Pertti Era
Markku Koskenvuo
Jaakko Kaprio
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, The Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (Viv), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä. pajalass@mail.nih.gov
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008 Feb;63(2):171-8
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Postural Balance - physiology
Predictive value of tests
Pressure
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Time Factors
Abstract
Inability to maintain balance while standing increases risk of falls in older people. The present study assessed whether center of pressure (COP) movement measured with force platform technology predicts risk for falls among older people with no manifest deficiency in standing balance.
Participants were 434 community-dwelling women, aged 63-76 years. COP was measured in six stances on a force platform. Following balance tests, participants reported their falls with 12 monthly calendars. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed from negative binomial regression models. For the analysis, those with > or =1 fall indoors were coded "indoor fallers," those with > or =1 fall outdoors, but no indoor falls, were coded "outdoor fallers." Outcome in the models was number of falls. Analyses were repeated including only participants without fall history prior to follow-up.
Among 198 fallers, there were 57 indoor and 132 outdoor fallers. The participants in the highest COP movement tertile, irrespective of the balance test, had a two- to fourfold risk for indoor falls compared to participants in the lowest COP tertile of the test. Inability to complete the tandem stance was also a significant predictor of the fall risk. The trend for increased risk for indoor falls was found also for participants in the highest COP movement tertile and without fall history. The COP movement in balance tests was not associated with outdoor falls.
Force platform balance tests provide valid information of postural control that can be used to predict fall risk even among older people without apparent balance problems or fall history. When the force platform is not available, tandem stance provides a screening tool to show increased fall risk in community-dwelling older people.
PubMed ID
18314453 View in PubMed
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Genetic and environmental influences on the tracking of body size from birth to early adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188599
Source
Obes Res. 2002 Sep;10(9):875-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Maija Räsänen
Aila Rissanen
Richard J Rose
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. kirsi.pietilainen@helsinki.fi
Source
Obes Res. 2002 Sep;10(9):875-84
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth weight
Body Constitution - genetics
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Environment
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
This study identified genetic and environmental influences on the tracking of body size from birth to 16 to 18.5 years of age.
Longitudinal information was collected from a nationally representative sample of Finnish twin adolescents (birth cohorts 1975 to 1979) and their parents through questionnaires mailed when the twins were ages 16 and 18.5 years old. The sample included 702 monozygotic, 724 same-sex dizygotic, and 762 opposite-sex dizygotic sets of twins. The measures used were length, weight, ponderal index (kilograms per cubic meters), and gestational age at birth, and height, weight, and body mass index (kilograms per square meters) at 16 to 18.5 years of age. The changes in genetic and environmental influences on body size from birth to early adulthood were analyzed by quantitative genetic modeling.
The twins who had a higher weight or ponderal index at birth were taller and heavier in early adulthood, whereas those who were longer at birth were taller, but not heavier, later in life. Adult height was affected more by the birth size than body mass index. In the genetic modeling analyses, the genetic factors accounting for the variation of body size became more apparent with age, and both genetic and environmental influences on stature had a sizable carry-over effect from birth to late adolescence, whereas for relative weight, the influences were more age-specific.
The genetic and environmental architecture of body size changes from birth to adulthood. Even in monozygotic twins who share their genetic background, the initially larger twin tended to remain larger, demonstrating the long-lasting effects of fetal environment on final body size.
PubMed ID
12226135 View in PubMed
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Midlife cardiovascular risk factors and late cognitive impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115191
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 May;28(5):405-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Jyri J Virta
Kauko Heikkilä
Markus Perola
Markku Koskenvuo
Ismo Räihä
Juha O Rinne
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. jyjuvi@gmail.com
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 May;28(5):405-16
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Apolipoprotein E4 - blood - genetics
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Obesity - complications
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Cardiovascular risk factors increase the risk of dementia in later life. The aims of the current study were to assess the effect of multiple midlife cardiovascular risk factors on the risk of cognitive impairment in later life, and to assess the validity of the previously suggested CAIDE Study risk score predicting dementia risk 20?years later. A total of 2,165 Finnish twins were followed and at the end of the follow-up their cognitive status was assessed with a validated telephone interview. The assessment of the risk factors at baseline was based on a self-report questionnaire. Relative risk ratios (RR) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic analyses performed. Midlife obesity (RR 2.42, 95?% CI 1.47-3.98), hypertension (RR 1.38, 95?% CI 1.01-1.88) and low leisure time physical activity (RR 2.52, 95?% CI 1.10-5.76) increased the risk of cognitive impairment after a mean follow-up of 22.6???2.3?years. Hypercholesterolemia did not significantly increase the risk (RR 1.52, 95?% CI 0.92-2.51). Overweight individuals who gained more than 10?% weight between 1981 and 1990 had an increased risk of cognitive impairment (RR 4.27, 95?% CI 1.62-11.2). The CAIDE Study risk score combining various individual risk factors had an area-under-curve of 0.74 (95?% CI 0.69-0.79, n?=?591), and there was a strong association between an increasing risk score and the risk of cognitive impairment. The results indicate that multiple midlife cardiovascular risk factors increase the risk of cognitive impairment in later life. Also, a risk score including easily measurable midlife factors predicts an individual's cognitive impairment risk well.
PubMed ID
23532744 View in PubMed
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Noise sensitivity and multiple chemical sensitivity scales: properties in a population based epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119273
Source
Noise Health. 2012 Sep-Oct;14(60):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marja Heinonen-Guzejev
Markku Koskenvuo
Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa
Heikki S Vuorinen
Kauko Heikkilä
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Hjelt Institute, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 41, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland. marja.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Noise Health. 2012 Sep-Oct;14(60):215-23
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - psychology
Loudness Perception
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - epidemiology - psychology
Noise - adverse effects
Personality Tests
Psychometrics
Regression Analysis
Sensory Thresholds
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Twin Studies as Topic
Abstract
Noise sensitivity is considered to be a self-perceived indicator of vulnerability to stressors in general and not noise alone. Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) has to some extent been accompanied by noise sensitivity, indicating a moderate correspondence between them. The aim of this study is to investigate if the Weinstein's Noise Sensitivity Scale and Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory's (QEESI) Chemical Intolerance Subscale can differentiate noise sensitivity and MCS as different entities, and if there are overlaps in the characteristics of noise sensitivity and MCS. In 2002, 327 individuals (166 men, 161 women; age range 45 - 66 years) from the Finnish Twin Cohort answered a questionnaire on noise-related and MCS items. Somatic, psychological, and lifestyle factors were obtained through earlier questionnaires for the same individuals. Both confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses (CFA and EFA) of the questionnaire items on the Weinstein's Noise Sensitivity Scale and QEESI's Chemical Intolerance Subscale indicated the presence of three factors - Noise Sensitivity, Chemical Sensitivity, and Ability to Concentrate factors - arising from the forming of two factors from the items of the Weinstein's scale. In the regression analyses, among all subjects, the Noise Sensitivity Factor was associated with neuroticism and smoking, and the Chemical Sensitivity Factor was associated with allergies and alcohol use. The study indicates that the Weinstein's Noise Sensitivity Scale and QEESI's Chemical Intolerance Subscale differentiate noise sensitivity and MCS as different entities.
PubMed ID
23117535 View in PubMed
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Physical and psychological functioning of daily living in relation to physical activity. A longitudinal study among former elite male athletes and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169850
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2006 Feb;18(1):40-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Heli Bäckmand
Jaakko Kaprio
Urho M Kujala
Seppo Sarna
Mikael Fogelholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2006 Feb;18(1):40-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Exercise
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
Physical exercise plays an important role in the prevention and reduction of disabilities in elderly people. The aim of this study was to determine the role of physical activity in the physical and psychological functioning of daily living in a cohort of former elite male athletes representing different sports, and controls of middle and old age.
Subjects were 664 former elite male athletes (mean age 64.4 years) and 500 controls (62.0 years) in middle and old age. Subjects were mailed "Physical activity and health survey" questionnaires in 1985 and 1995. The primary outcomes the physical and psychological functioning of daily living--were assessed in 1995 using items from the Mini-Finland Health Survey. Logistic regression was used for longitudinal as well as cross-sectional analyses to estimate odds ratios (OR) for poor physical and psychological functioning of daily living in relation to recreational physical activity adjusted for age, sport group, life-style, BMI, mood, chronic diseases, personality characteristics, life-events and socio-economic status.
In the longitudinal analysis, low levels of physical activity (lowest MET quintile vs highest quintile) in 1985 (OR 4.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-11.9), older age (> or =70 yrs vs under 60 yrs OR 9.93, 95% CI 4.90-20.2), depression (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.01-4.09) and anxiety in 1995 (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.34-5.32) increased the risk of poor physical functioning of daily living in 1995, whereas an increase in a physical activity between 1985-1995 (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83-0.95) protected against poor physical functioning of daily living. A history of participating in specific types of sports, especially among certain power sports (weight-lifting and track & field throwers) (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.60) and team sports (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.81) did reveal a significant protective effect against poor psychological functioning of daily living in the longitudinal analysis.
This study suggests that an increase in physical exercise supports physical daily functionality. A specific history of sports participation promotes psychological well-being at an older age.
PubMed ID
16608135 View in PubMed
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Poor vision accompanied with other sensory impairments as a predictor of falls in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154243
Source
Age Ageing. 2009 Mar;38(2):162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Jenni Kulmala
Anne Viljanen
Sarianna Sipilä
Satu Pajala
Olavi Pärssinen
Markku Kauppinen
Markku Koskenvuo
Jaakko Kaprio
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, The Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. jenni.kulmala@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Age Ageing. 2009 Mar;38(2):162-7
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Postural Balance
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Vision, Low - epidemiology
Visual acuity
Abstract
we studied visual acuity (VA) and co-existing hearing impairment and poor standing balance as predictors of falls.
prospective study with 1-year follow-up.
research laboratory and residential environment.
428 women aged 63-76 years from the Finnish Twin Study on Aging.
participants were followed up for incidence of falls over 1 year. VA, hearing ability and standing balance were assessed at the baseline. The incidence rate ratios (IRR) for falls were computed using the negative binomial regression model.
during the follow-up, 47% of participants experienced a fall. After adjusting for age and interdependence of twin sisters, participants with vision impairment (VA of
PubMed ID
19008307 View in PubMed
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Recurrent dieting and smoking among Finnish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162425
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Suoma E Saarni
Karri Silventoinen
Aila Rissanen
Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva
Jaakko Kaprio
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, PO Box 41, University of Helsinki, and Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. suoma.saarni@helsinki.fi
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1851-9
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Diet, Reducing - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine the association of smoking with recurrent dieting and BMI among Finnish adults.
We used questionnaire data from 1990 on 11,055 subjects from the Finnish Twin Cohort who were 33 to 61 years of age. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was carried out using lifetime dieting as the outcome variable and smoking as the main explanatory variable, adjusted for BMI and age. Twin pairs discordant for dieting and smoking were studied to examine the effect of environmental and genetic factors.
Among women, current smokers [odds ratio (OR), 1.09 to 1.41 at different ages] and former smokers (OR, 1.52 to 2.82) were more likely to have dieted recurrently than never smokers. Among men, current smokers were less likely (OR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.55, 0.87) and former smokers were more likely (OR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.05, 1.61) to have dieted recurrently at different ages. The differences between the discordant pairs were consistent with this, although not statistically significant.
Recurrent dieting was associated with former smoking in both sexes and with current smoking in women.
PubMed ID
17636104 View in PubMed
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The stability of life satisfaction in a 15-year follow-up of adult Finns healthy at baseline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176572
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2005;5:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Heli Koivumaa-Honkanen
Jaakko Kaprio
Risto J Honkanen
Heimo Viinamäki
Markku Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. heli.koivumaa@kuh.fi
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2005;5:4
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - ethnology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
While physical health has improved considerably over recent decades in Finland, the disease burden of mental health, especially that of depression, has become increasingly demanding. However, we lack long-term data on the natural course of subjective well-being in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term course of self-reported life satisfaction.
This was a 15-year prospective cohort study on a nationwide sample of adult Finnish twins (N = 9679), aged 18-45 and healthy at baseline, who responded to postal questionnaires in 1975, 1981 and 1990 including a 4-item life satisfaction scale (happiness/easiness/interest in life and feelings of loneliness). Life satisfaction score (range: 4-20) was classified into three categories: satisfied (4-6), intermediate (7-11) and dissatisfied group (12-20). The associations between life satisfaction scores during the follow-up were studied with linear/logistic regression.
Moderate stability and only a slight effect of age or birth-cohort on mean life satisfaction score (LS) were detected. In 1990, 56% of all and 31% of the dissatisfied remained in the same LS category as at baseline. Only 5.9% of the study subjects changed from being satisfied to dissatisfied or vice versa. Correlations between continuous scores (1975, 1981 and 1990) were 0.3-0.4. Baseline dissatisfaction (compared to satisfaction) predicted dissatisfaction in 1981 (OR = 10.4; 95%CI 8.3-13.1) and 1990 (5.6; 4.6-6.8). Multiple adjustments decreased the risk only slightly.
Life satisfaction in adult Finns was moderately stable during 15 years. Among an identifiable group (i.e. the dissatisfied) life dissatisfaction may become persistent, which places them at a greater risk of adverse health outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15656900 View in PubMed
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A study of sedentary behaviour in the older Finnish twin cohort: a cross sectional analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259472
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:209140
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Maarit Piirtola
Jaakko Kaprio
Annina Ropponen
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:209140
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sedentary lifestyle
Twins - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) on total sitting time among the Finnish twin cohort. Also, heritability and environmental factors were analysed. The final sample included 6713 twin individuals 53-67 years of age (46% men). Among them there were 1940 complete twin pairs (732 monozygotic [MZ] and 1208 dizygotic [DZ] twin pairs). Sedentary behaviour was queried with a self-reported questionnaire with multiple-choice questions about sitting time at different domains. The mean total sitting time per day was 6 hours 41 minutes (standard deviation: 2 hours 41 minutes). The total sitting time was less in women than in men (P = 0.002). Older age was associated with less total sitting time (P
Notes
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