Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
Less detail

Colles' fracture associated with reduced bone mineral content. Photon densitometry in 74 patients with matched controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222973
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Oct;63(5):552-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
H. Mallmin
S. Ljunghall
T. Naessén
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 1992 Oct;63(5):552-4
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Age Factors
Aged
Bone Density
Colles' Fracture - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Osteoporosis - complications - pathology - radionuclide imaging
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a prospective population-based investigation, we measured bone mineral density (BMD) of the forearm using single-photon absorptiometry at both a distal and a more proximal site in 74 Colles'-fracture patients who were compared with controls matched for age, sex, and years after menopause. For both groups there was a marked inverse relationship between age and bone mass. However, over the entire age range, the probands had 11 percent reduced BMD when compared with the controls. Our findings confirm that patients with fracture of the distal forearm have reduced BMD. They constitute an appropriate group for studies aimed at prevention of fracture in the elderly.
PubMed ID
1441956 View in PubMed
Less detail

Muscle strength correlates with total body bone mineral density in young women but not in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52051
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Feb;14(1):24-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
E. Ribom
O. Ljunggren
K. Piehl-Aulin
S. Ljunghall
L E Bratteby
G. Samuelson
H. Mallmin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. eva.ribon@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Feb;14(1):24-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Bone Density - physiology
Comparative Study
Female
Hand - physiology
Humans
Knee - physiology
Life Style
Male
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis is a growing health problem. One of the proposed reasons for this is a more sedentary lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between muscle strength and total body bone mineral density (TBMD) in young adults at expected peak bone mass. METHODS: Sixty-four women and 61 men (total 125) 21 years of age were included. Handgrip strength, isokinetic knee-flexion and -extension muscle strength, TBMD, and body composition were measured. RESULTS: Univariate regression analyses showed that knee flexion and extension explained almost 30% of the variation in TBMD in women, whereas handgrip strength was not associated with TBMD. In men, no correlation between any measures of muscle strength and TBMD was evident. Stepwise regression analysis showed that knee-flexion and -extension muscle strength in women were associated with TBMD, R2=0.27. In men, lean body mass, fat mass, weight, and height were predictors for TBMD, R2=0.43, whereas muscle strength did not affect the prediction of TBMD. CONCLUSIONS: Muscle strength at weight-bearing sites is related to TBMD in women, whereas body composition is related to TBMD in men. The association of lower limb strength on TBMD only in young women indicates a gender difference.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2004 Feb;14(1):114971423
PubMed ID
14723784 View in PubMed
Less detail

Organochlorines and bone mineral density in Swedish men from the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195327
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):1036-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
A W Glynn
K. Michaëlsson
P M Lind
A. Wolk
M. Aune
S. Atuma
P O Darnerud
H. Mallmin
Author Affiliation
Toxicology Division, Swedish National Food Administration, Uppsala.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2000;11(12):1036-42
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Androgen Antagonists - metabolism
Bone Density - drug effects
DDT - adverse effects - blood
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects - blood
Estrogen Receptor Modulators - metabolism
Estrogens - metabolism
Hexachlorobenzene - blood - pharmacology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - adverse effects - blood
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Persistent organochlorines (POCs), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and DDT, are present at relatively high concentrations in food and show estrogenic, anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic activity in biological test systems. Because bone mineral density (BMD) in men is influenced by sex hormones, we looked for associations between BMD and serum concentrations of POCs in 115 men (mean age 63 years, range 40-75 years) from the general Swedish population. Ten PCB congeners, five DDT isomers, hexachlorobenzene, three hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, trans-nonachlor and oxychlordane were analyzed by gas chromatography. Quantitative bone measurements were performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at three sites: whole body, the L2-L4 region of the lumbar spine, and the neck region of the proximal femur, as well as by quantitative ultrasound on the left os calcis (broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS)). After adjustment for confounding factors in linear regression analyses we found no strong association between serum concentrations of single POCs and the five BMD and ultrasound variables. When POCs were grouped according to hormonal activity (estrogenic, anti-estrogenic, anti-androgenic) and the study subjects were divided into organochlorine concentration quartiles, a weak association was indicated between increased serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE (antiandrogenic) and decreased BMD, BUA and SOS. This may suggest that p,p'-DDE could cause negative effects on bone density, but the findings might also be due to chance since multiple comparisons were made in the statistical analysis. Overall our results do not suggest that the studied POCs caused major effects on bone density in our study group.
PubMed ID
11256895 View in PubMed
Less detail

Whole-body mineral measurements in Swedish adolescents at 17 years compared to 15 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9871
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(10):1031-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
L E Bratteb
G. Samuelson
B. Sandhagen
H. Mallmin
H. Lantz
L. Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. lars-eric.bratteby@medsci.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(10):1031-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Puberty
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: To provide reference data for bone mineral variables in 15- and 17-y-old adolescents and to analyse the relationships between these variables and measures of bone and body size, gender, puberty, growth, various lifestyle and environmental factors and socioeconomic background. METHODS: In the same 321 randomly selected adolescents (147 boys and 174 girls) living in two different regions of Sweden, the total bone mineral content (TBMC), bone area (BA) and total bone mineral density (TBMD) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at ages 15 and 17 y. The effects of bone and body size, gender, growth, sexual maturity, physical activity, region of domicile, social conditions, food habits, smoking and alcohol intake on TBMC and TBMD were examined in multivariate analyses. RESULTS: In the 15-y-old adolescents, BA, height, gender, physical activity, maturity and weight explained 91% and 48%, of the variance in TBMC and TBMD, respectively. In similar analyses in the 17-y-olds, the corresponding figures were 92% and 62%, respectively, when BA, height, growth, physical activity, gender and region emerged as significant in the model. In all these analyses, BA explained most of the variance in TBMC and TBMD. No significant reduction of variance was found when different measures of social conditions, smoking, food habits, alcohol or dietary intakes of energy, calcium or vitamin D were included in the models. The reason why region of domicile had a significant impact on TBMC in the 17-y-olds is not known. The fact that the normal fluoride concentration in drinking water (1.1 mg/L) is 10 times higher in the region where TBMC was higher than in the other region is an interesting observation. CONCLUSION: Almost 90% of the variance in TBMC and 50% of that in TBMD was explained by measures of bone and body size and only a few percent by gender, physical activity, Tanner stage, growth and region of domicile.
PubMed ID
12434886 View in PubMed
Less detail