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Bone mineral density in femoral neck is positively correlated to circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190890
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
P. Gillberg
H. Olofsson
H. Mallmin
W F Blum
S. Ljunghall
A G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2002 Jan;70(1):22-9
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Bone Density
Femur Neck - metabolism - radiography
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Lumbar Vertebrae - metabolism - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Studies on the hormonal regulation of bone metabolism in men have indicated covariation between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and sex hormones with bone mineral density (BMD). In this study the relationships between BMD in total body, lumbar spine, femoral neck, distal and ultradistal (UD) radius and circulating levels of IGFs, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), and sex steroids were investigated in 55 Swedish men between 22 and 85 (52 +/- 18, mean +/- SD) years of age. BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck was positively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = 0.31 to 0.49), IGF-II (r = 0.32 to 0.48), IGFBP-3 (r = 0.37 to 0.53), and free androgen index (FAI) (r = 0.32 to 0.40), and negatively with IGFBP-1 (r = -0.37 to -0.41) and IGFBP-2 (r = -0.29 to -0.41) levels. A positive correlation was observed between BMD in femoral neck and estradiol/SHBG ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.01). Age correlated negatively with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, FAI, estradiol/SHBG ratio, and BMD in total body, distal and UD radius, and femoral neck, and positively with IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, and SHBG levels. According to stepwise multiple regression analyses, a combination of weight, IGFBP-3, and testosterone accounted for 43% of the variation in BMD in femoral neck, 34% in ultradistal radius and 48% in total body (P
PubMed ID
11907704 View in PubMed
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Whole-body mineral measurements in Swedish adolescents at 17 years compared to 15 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9871
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(10):1031-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
L E Bratteb
G. Samuelson
B. Sandhagen
H. Mallmin
H. Lantz
L. Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. lars-eric.bratteby@medsci.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(10):1031-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Puberty
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: To provide reference data for bone mineral variables in 15- and 17-y-old adolescents and to analyse the relationships between these variables and measures of bone and body size, gender, puberty, growth, various lifestyle and environmental factors and socioeconomic background. METHODS: In the same 321 randomly selected adolescents (147 boys and 174 girls) living in two different regions of Sweden, the total bone mineral content (TBMC), bone area (BA) and total bone mineral density (TBMD) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at ages 15 and 17 y. The effects of bone and body size, gender, growth, sexual maturity, physical activity, region of domicile, social conditions, food habits, smoking and alcohol intake on TBMC and TBMD were examined in multivariate analyses. RESULTS: In the 15-y-old adolescents, BA, height, gender, physical activity, maturity and weight explained 91% and 48%, of the variance in TBMC and TBMD, respectively. In similar analyses in the 17-y-olds, the corresponding figures were 92% and 62%, respectively, when BA, height, growth, physical activity, gender and region emerged as significant in the model. In all these analyses, BA explained most of the variance in TBMC and TBMD. No significant reduction of variance was found when different measures of social conditions, smoking, food habits, alcohol or dietary intakes of energy, calcium or vitamin D were included in the models. The reason why region of domicile had a significant impact on TBMC in the 17-y-olds is not known. The fact that the normal fluoride concentration in drinking water (1.1 mg/L) is 10 times higher in the region where TBMC was higher than in the other region is an interesting observation. CONCLUSION: Almost 90% of the variance in TBMC and 50% of that in TBMD was explained by measures of bone and body size and only a few percent by gender, physical activity, Tanner stage, growth and region of domicile.
PubMed ID
12434886 View in PubMed
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