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Gender and age differences in attitudes to dental pain and dental control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207770
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Aug;25(4):314-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
A. Liddell
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. aliddell@morgan.ucs.mun.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Aug;25(4):314-8
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Anxiety - psychology
Dental Care - psychology
Emotions
Fear
Female
Forecasting
Health Behavior
Humans
Internal-External Control
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pain - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Characteristics
Sex Factors
Abstract
In the literature, it is usual to find women and younger subjects reporting higher levels of dental anxiety than men and older subjects. Fear of pain was found to be the most important predictor of dental anxiety and issues of control were also related to such anxiety. Therefore, it was predicted that gender and age differences would be reflected in attitudes to pain and control. Subjects were randomly selected from the voters' list in metropolitan Toronto and mailed a questionnaire with a request for cooperation in a study of their thoughts, feelings, and behaviour regarding dental treatment. The questionnaire included demographic data, measures of dental anxiety and painful experiences as well as the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale and the Iowa Dental Control Index. The results supported the main predictions. In addition, attitudes to pain and control were found to be complex phenomena with characteristic gender differences.
PubMed ID
9332809 View in PubMed
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Relationship between dental and general health behaviors in a Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213300
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1996;56(4):198-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B J Payne
D. Locker
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. bpayne@bldgarts.lanl.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Public Health Dent. 1996;56(4):198-204
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Dental Care
Dental Devices, Home Care
Diet, Cariogenic
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Income
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oral Health
Preventive Dentistry
Preventive Medicine
Regression Analysis
Seat Belts
Sex Factors
Smoking
Toothbrushing
Abstract
Because the promotion of healthier life styles has become a public health issue of increasing interest, a survey was conducted to compare levels of preventive oral and general health behaviors.
A randomly selected population of voters aged 19 years and older living in a multicultural suburb of metropolitan Toronto, Canada, participated in a mail survey.
Dentate respondents (n = 976) reported high optimal levels for at least daily toothbrushing (96%); moderate levels of preventive yearly dental examination (69%); and low levels for flossing (22%), using an interdental device (25%), not snacking between meals (12%), and consuming fewer than two cariogenic foods on the previous day (26%). For the general health behaviors, the majority did not smoke (75%), had low alcohol intake (89%), used seat belts (69%), and exercised three times weekly (50%). Additive indices for the oral and general health behaviors were significantly, although weakly, correlated (r = 13; P
PubMed ID
8906703 View in PubMed
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Work-related stress and its predictors among Canadian dental assistants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230058
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Oct;17(5):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1989
Author
D. Locker
D. Burman
D. Otchere
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1989 Oct;17(5):263-6
Date
Oct-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Assistants - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Ontario
Personnel Management
Personnel Turnover
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
This paper reports the results of a survey of 1000 certified dental assistants in Ontario, Canada. The aim was to obtain data on work-related stress, its sources and predictors. Of those responding to the survey, 38.8% said that their work was moderately stressful and 14.5% said it was very or extremely stressful. Approximately one-third had been bothered by stress at work on three or more days in the previous week. The main sources of stress were working under constant time pressures, running behind schedule and feeling undervalued by the dentist. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that the main predictors of work stress were not having a clear job description, working long hours, life stress while not at work and age. However, these variables explained less than 10% of the variance in job stress scores. Overall, 22.8% said it was very likely that they would seek work in another practice or seek work outside dentistry in the coming year. There was a significant association between work stress and job intentions; 43.0% of those reporting high levels of stress intended to change jobs compared to 8.9% of those who said that their job was not at all stressful (P less than 0.0001). These findings have implications for the way in which dental practice is organised and managed.
PubMed ID
2791518 View in PubMed
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