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Dietary factors determining diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. A 20-year follow-up of the Finnish and Dutch cohorts of the Seven Countries Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214653
Source
Diabetes Care. 1995 Aug;18(8):1104-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
E J Feskens
S M Virtanen
L. Räsänen
J. Tuomilehto
J. Stengård
J. Pekkanen
A. Nissinen
D. Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Diseases and Environmental Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Source
Diabetes Care. 1995 Aug;18(8):1104-12
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology
Diet
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Glucose Intolerance - blood - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Predictive value of tests
Reference Values
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the role of diet as a predictor of glucose intolerance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM).
At the 30-year follow-up survey of the Dutch and Finnish cohorts of the Seven Countries Study, in 1989/1990, men were examined according to a standardized protocol including a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Information on habitual food consumption was obtained using the cross-check dietary history method. Those 338 men in whom information on habitual diet was also available 20 years earlier were included in this study. Subjects known as having diabetes in 1989/1990 were excluded from the analyses.
Adjusting for age and cohort, the intake of total, saturated, and monounsaturated fatty acids and dietary cholesterol 20 years before diagnosis was higher in men with newly diagnosed diabetes in the survey than in men with normal or impaired glucose tolerance. After adjustment for cohort, age, past body mass index, and past energy intake, the past intake of total fat was positively associated with 2-h postload glucose level (P
PubMed ID
7587845 View in PubMed
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Mortality among participants and non-participants in a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119825
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;27(11):837-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Signe Benzon Larsen
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Joachim Schüz
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Christoffer Johansen
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. benzon@cancer.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2012 Nov;27(11):837-45
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Cause of Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Patient Participation
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Socioeconomic position and lifestyle often affect participation in scientific studies. The authors investigated differences in overall and cause-specific mortality between participants and non-participants in the prospective Danish cohort study "Diet, Cancer and Health" and the association between non-participation and mortality by socioeconomic position. A total of 80,996 men and 79,729 women aged 50-64 years, were invited. The authors obtained register data on education, income, death and cause-specific mortality for participants and non-participants and used survival curves to examine differences in overall mortality. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality rate ratio (MRR) by socioeconomic group and by cause of death of participants and non-participants. After a median follow-up of 13 years (5-95 percentiles, 5-14 years), the MRRs for overall mortality among non-participants were 2.09 (95% CI 1.99-2.14) and 2.29 (95% CI 2.19-2.40) among men and women, respectively compared with participants. After adjusting for socioeconomic position, the MRRs changed to 1.73 (95% CI 1.66-1.79) and 2.10 (95% CO 2.01-2.20) among men and women, respectively. The MRRs did not level out after up to 15 years of follow-up. The MRRs were all significantly increased and ranged from 1.51 to 4.28 for men, depending on the cause of death, and from 1.60 to 3.99 for women. Clear differences in mortality from all investigated causes of death were found between participants and non-participants, which persisted after up to 15 years of follow-up. Socioeconomic position had little effect on this result.
PubMed ID
23070658 View in PubMed
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