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[Equally good care of myocardial infarction in Sweden today. Geographic differences in mortality are without significance for the individual patient]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53204
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Jan 3-16;102(1-2):20-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Juan Merlo
Anders Håkansson
Anders Beckman
Ulf Lindblad
Martin Lindström
Ulf-G Gerdtham
Lennart Råstam
Author Affiliation
Samhällsmedicinska institutionen, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö. juan.merlo@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Jan 3-16;102(1-2):20-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Odds Ratio
Quality of Health Care
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It is a known fact that the 1990s brought a decrease in mortality after myocardial infarction in Sweden but that differences in mortality rates following myocardial infarction still remain between the Swedish counties. Unresolved, however, are questions as to what these inter-county differences mean for the individual patient and what role hospital care plays in this context. We analysed all patients aged 64-85 years who were hospitalised following diagnosis of myocardial infarction in Sweden during the period 1993-1996. To gain an understanding of the relevance of geographical differences in mortality after myocardial infarction for the individual patient we applied multi-level regression analysis and calculated county and hospital median odds ratios (MORs) in relation to 28-day mortality. For hospitalised patients with myocardial infarction, being cared for in another hospital with higher mortality would increase the risk of dying by 9% (MOR = l.09) in men and 12% in women. If these patients moved to another county with higher mortality the risk would increase by 7% and 3%, respectively. The small geographical differences in 28-day mortality after myocardial infarction found in Sweden suggest a high degree of equality across the country; however, further improvement could be achieved in hospital care, especially for women--an issue that deserves further analysis.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2005 Jan 3-16;102(1-2):9-1015707101
PubMed ID
15707102 View in PubMed
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[Measurement of physical capacities in the elderly: a secondary analysis of the Quebec longitudinal study NuAge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164941
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2006 Nov-Dec;48(6):446-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
José Alberto Avila-Funes
Katherine Gray-Donald
Hélène Payette
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche sur le vieillissement, Institut universitaire de g6riatrie de Sherbrooke, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canadá.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2006 Nov-Dec;48(6):446-54
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Disability Evaluation
Exercise
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Physical Fitness
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Walking
Abstract
To assess the validity of a battery of functional capacity tests in community-living elderly Canadians.
cross-sectional study.
baseline data from 1793 men and women aged 74.4 +/- 4.1 participating in the NuAge longitudinal study were collected from December 2003 to April 2005 and used for the analyses. A global score measuring functional capacities (BFC) was constructed as the sum of four tests according to a method proposed by Guralnik [Timed Up and Go, walking speed (4 m), chair stands (five times), standing balance]. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to study the relationship between age, sex, and physical activity, and BFC score.
The global functional capacities score had an internal consistency of 0.74. It was significantly associated with age, sex and measures of mental and physical health status including: cognitive function (
PubMed ID
17326340 View in PubMed
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[Migration and health. Social and medical consequences of exile and repatriation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73058
Source
Rev Med Chil. 1995 Apr;123(4):426-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
J. Sundquist
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Centro de Medicina Social y General, Universidad de Lund.
Source
Rev Med Chil. 1995 Apr;123(4):426-38
Date
Apr-1995
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chile - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Health status
Humans
Latin America - ethnology
Male
Refugees
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Problems
Sweden
Abstract
Three hundred thirty eight Latinamerican refugees living in Lund, Sweden, 51 that lived in Lund and were repatriated to Chile and 1132 Swedish subjects were interviewed using the survey of the Swedish National Statistics Institute. Data were analyzed using an unconditional logistic regression model, controlling possible confounders. Refugees living in Lund and repatriated to Chile considered their health as bad in a higher proportion than their Swedish counterparts, with an odds ratio of 3.48 (2.03-5.66) and 4.78 (2.1-10.25) respectively. Refugees and repatriated subjects had a higher risk of suffering long lasting illnesses with odds ratio of 2.84 and 2.64 respectively. It is concluded that there are great differences in life standards, housing and social relationships between Swedish people, Latinamerican refugees and repatriated individuals.
PubMed ID
8525186 View in PubMed
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[Poisson's regression better than x2-test. Suicide frequency in Gotland as a basis for analysis of changes of rare events in a small group]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68360
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):433-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2001
Author
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
sven-erik.johansson@klinvet.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 31;98(5):433-6
Date
Jan-31-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Models, Statistical
Poisson Distribution
Regression Analysis
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
11229086 View in PubMed
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